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APPENDIX A

CHECKLISTS


AREA ASSESSMENT CHECKLIST

A standardized checklist can enhance the intelligence collection effort and minimize train-up time for 52 sections. The Area Assessment Checklist below was developed by U.S. forces during Operation RESTORE HOPE in Somalia to enhance the intelligence collection effort during operations other than war. For additional guidance, see Appendix B, FM 41-10, Civil Affairs Operations. Use the following checklist as a guide to develop a standardized area assessment checklist for operations in Haiti.

  • Where are the refugees originally from?
    What is the size of the original population?
    What is the size of the area and population that the village services in the surrounding countryside?
    What is the size of the refugee population?
    Why did they come here?
    What is the relationship of the village with the surrounding villages?
    Are they related?
    Do they support each other?
    Are they hostile toward each other?
    Is any portion of the village population discriminated against?

  • What is the food and water status of the village?
    Where do they get their food?
    What other means of subsistence are available?
    Are the villagers farmers or herders?
    What is the status of their crops/herds?
    What is the quality of the water source?

  • What is the medical status of the village?
    What services are available in the village?
    What is the location of the nearest medical facility?
    Is there evidence of illness and/or starvation?
    What portion of the population is affected?
    What is the death rate?
    What diseases are reported in the village?

  • What civilian organization exists in the village?
    Who are its leaders?

  • What civil/military organizations exist in the village?
    Who are its leaders?

  • What organization/leadership element does the general population seem to support or trust the most?
    Which organization seems to have the most control in the village?

  • What UN relief agencies operate in the village?
    Who are its representatives?
    What services do they provide?
    What portion of the population do they service?
    Do they have an outreach program for the surrounding countryside?

  • What is the security situation in the village?
    What element(s) is the source of the problems?
    What types and quantities of weapons are in the village?
    What are the locations of minefields?

  • What commercial or business activities are present in the village?
    What services or products do they produce?

  • Determine the groups in the village that are the most in need.
    What are their numbers?
    Where did they come from?
    How long have they been there?
    What are their specific needs?

  • What civic employment projects would the village leaders like to see started?

  • Determine the number of families in the village.
    What are their names (family)?
    How many in each family?

  • What food items are available in the local market?
    What are the cost of these items?
    Are relief supplies being sold in the market?
    If so, what items, what is their source, and what is the price?

  • What skilled labor or services are available in the village (non-HRA)?

  • What is the size of any transient population in the village?
    Where did they come from, and how long have they been there?
CHECKPOINT AND ROADBLOCK
PRIORITY INTELLIGENCE REQUIREMENT (PIR) CHECKLIST

The force can gain valuable intelligence information while operating checkpoints. The checklist below was developed during operations in Somalia to help standardize the intelligence collection effort. This list is not all inclusive, but gives suggestions into many areas of importance at checkpoints and roadblocks.

  • Report number and type of vehicles stopped.
  • Report identifying markings, license plate numbers, and a description of the vehicle.
  • Report number of passengers in the vehicle.
  • Report age and sex mix of passengers.
  • Report type and quantity of cargo.
  • Report point of origination and destination of vehicle.
  • Report stated reason for travel by passengers.
  • Report any weapons found in the vehicles.
  • Report any sightings of weapons or bandits by passengers.
  • Report condition of passengers (general health, dress, and attitude).
  • Report anything unusual reported by passengers.
CONVOY DEBRIEF CHECKLIST

The use of a standardized checklist can greatly enhance the intelligence collection effort and minimize train-up time. Units presented with nontraditional intelligence requirements should develop a detailed checklist to ensure the completeness and standardization of the collection effort. Use a convoy checklist to debrief convoy personnel to ensure the standardization of the intelligence collection effort. Use the following checklist as an example.

  • Use a SALUTE report when reporting the size, activity, location, unit, time, and equipment of belligerents seen during a convoy.

  • Report any changes in road conditions (potholes, collapsed culverts, damaged bridges).

  • Report acts of violence directed toward the convoy (aiming of weapons, rock throwing, location and number of personnel).

  • Report incidents of hostile intent by civilians directed toward the convoy (shouting, jeering, impeding operations, number of personnel, nature of incident, location).

  • Report incidents of shots fired at or around a convoy (location, number of personnel, type weapons, action taken, casualties).

  • Report incidents of convoys being stopped by or harassed by roadblocks (location, number of personnel, nature of incident, action taken).

  • Report thefts from convoys (items taken, description of thief, location, action taken).
PATROL CHECKLIST

The Patrol Checklist below was developed during operations in Somalia to standardize the intelligence collection effort. Use this example to develop an appropriate checklist for operations in Haiti.

1. BELLIGERENTS PRIORITY INTELLIGENCE REQUIREMENTS: Will the belligerents interfere with U.S. operations? If so, how and under what circumstances?

a. Indicators:
  • Anti-U.S. demonstrations.
  • Hostile or uncooperative behavior toward U.S. forces.
  • Stealing or destroying U.S. equipment or property.
  • Presence of enemy weapon and supply caches.
  • Attacks on U.S. forces.
  • Disruptions of humanitarian relief agency (HRA) operations.

b. Securiry Operations Reports:
  • Report anti-U.S. graffiti, picket signs, leaflets, or derogatory speeches made by Haitians.
  • Report gatherings of Haitians (10 or more).
  • Report the establishment of road blocks or control points by Haitians.
  • Report attempts to impede or disrupt U.S. operations.
  • Report losses of equipment and supplies.
  • Report possession of U.S. equipment or property by Haitians.
  • Report all weapons (type, quantity, condition) and supply caches found.
  • Report all attacks (direct fire, indirect fire and rock throwing, etc.) on U.S. forces.
  • Report sightings of Haiti trucks with external fuel tanks.
  • Report sightings of any armed Haiti forces (vehicles with mounted weapons and dismounted groups of five or more).
  • Report sightings of weapons systems to include APCs, tanks, artillery, mortars, AAA guns, and AT guns.
  • Report locations of minefields and indications of mines being used as booby traps.
  • Report attempts to interfere with or disrupt humanitarian relief agency (HRA) operations.
  • Report location and size of refugee camps.
  • Report changes in the conditions or activities within refugee camps and villages.
  • Report all encounters with civilians. Determine feelings and attitudes toward U.S. forces.
  • Report names of known or suspected clan leaders/elders.
  • Report known or suspected existences of inter- and intra-clan rivalries.

2. GENERAL POPULATION PIR: What is the status and condition of the general population?

a. Indicators:
  • Requests from civilian population for food, water, or medical support.
  • Civilians appearing in need of food or medical attention.
  • Presence of food and water supplies.
  • HRA operations in area.

b. SORs:
  • Report all requests from the civilian population for food, water, or medical attention.
  • Report civilians appearing in need of food or medical attention.
  • Report civilians complaining of robberies, violence, or acts of intimidation.
  • Report HRAs operating in area; include POC and location.
  • Report supplies of food and water; include livestock.
  • Report general attitude of population about U.S. presence.
  • Report general daily activities.
  • Report approximate size of villages.
  • Report age distribution of population.
  • Report names of English-speaking civilians.
  • Report all changes in daily routines of the population.
  • Report primary means of income.
  • Report means of transportation available.
  • Report road conditions/trafficability.

AIRFIELD SECURITY CHECKLIST

The airfield security checklist below was developed during operations in Somalia to standardize the intelligence collection effort. Use this checklist as an example to develop an airfield security checklist for operations in Haiti.

PRIORITY INTELLIGENCE REQUIREMENTS: Will the belligerents attempt to gain unauthorized entry onto the U.S. base? If so, when, where, how, and for what purpose?

a. Indicators:
  • Hostile or uncooperative behavior toward U.S. forces.
  • Stealing or destroying U.S. equipment or property.
  • Presence of enemy weapons and supply caches.
  • Attacks on U.S. forces.

b. Security Operations Reports:
  • Report unauthorized Haitians on the airfield complex.
  • Report the establishment of road blocks or control points by Haitians.
  • Report attempts to impede or disrupt U.S. operations.
  • Report losses of equipment and supplies.
  • Report possession of U.S. equipment or property by Haitians.
  • Report all weapons (type, quantity, condition) and supply caches found.
  • Report all attacks (direct fire, indirect fire and rock throwing, etc.) on U.S. forces.
  • Report sightings of any armed Haiti forces (vehicles and dismounted groups).
  • Report sightings of weapons systems to include APCs, tanks, artillery, mortars, AAA guns, and AT guns.
  • Report locations of booby traps.
  • Report civilian vehicles (type vehicle, cargo, number of personnel, weapons).



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