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CHAPTER 2

ORGANIZATION


MLRS units are organized and equipped to provide FA missile fires in support of maneuver force and to reinforce the fires of other FA units. The MLRS battalion is usually attached to an FA brigade but may be attached to a division. An MLRS battery (btry) is organic to a heavy division to provide immediately responsive fires to the division commander.


Section I

STRUCTURE


MLRS Battalion

The mission of the MLRS battalion is to provide field artillery medium range rocket and long range missiles fires in support of the corps, army, theater, joint/coalition forces and MAGTFs or in the conduct of TMD to destroy, neutralize or suppress the enemy in accordance with Army Depth and Simultaneous Attack Doctrine. The MLRS battalion is organic to a corps, but normally assigned or attached to a headquarters and headquarters battery (HHB), FA brigade, TOE 06042L100/L200. It may be further attached to a HHB, division artillery (div arty), Marine Artillery Regiment, to Joint or coalition forces in support of multi-national initiatives or to other controlling headquarters as required.

The MLRS battalion is composed of a headquarters, headquarters and service (HHS) battery and three firing batteries with nine launchers each (see Figure 2-1).

The battalion can operate as a single unit, or it can detach batteries to perform separate tactical missions. The MLRS battalion headquarters may assume control of one or more of its own batteries and of divisional MLRS batteries. In this role, the battalion headquarters may act as an MLRS controlling headquarters in coordination with the force artillery commander. In heavy divisions, the div arty assumes the role of an MLRS battalion staff in conducting coordination and providing command and control of the divisional MLRS battery.

Headquarters, Headquarters and Service Battery

The mission of the HHS is to provide command, control, administrative and service support for organic and attached elements. It is also to procure, distribute, administer and coordinate supply transactions for all classes of supply, and to provide unit maintenance support not within the capabilities of the firing batteries. The HHS is organic to the FA battalion, MLRS TOE 06465L000. The HHS is organized and equipped to coordinate administrative, logistical, maintenance, and communications support for the battalion headquarters and three firing batteries (see Figure 2-2). The functional elements of the HHS are discussed below.

Battalion Command Section

The battalion headquarters consists of the battalion commander and his staff: the executive officer (XO), adjutant (S1), intelligence officer (S2), operations officer (S3), battalion (bn) logistics officer (S4), battalion signal officer (BSO), chaplain, and command sergeant major (CSM). This headquarters controls and coordinates battalion activities. Equipment includes two 1 l/4-ton high-mobility, multipurpose wheeled vehicles ( HMMWVs) with secure FM radios (one with a AN/VRC-92A and the other with AN/VRC-89A).

Battery Headquarters

The battery headquarters is supervised by the battery commander (BC) and the first sergeant (1SG). It includes the supply sergeant, a decontamination specialist, an armorer, and a driver. It provides command and control and administrative, supply, support to, and coordinates security for the battery. The TOE equipment includes two HMMWVs, one cargo truck, and one secure FM radio (AN/VRC-90A).

Operations Section

The operations section is supervised by the operations officer. It is staffed with the operations sergeant; a chemical officer; a nuclear, biological, chemical (NBC) noncommissioned officer (NCO); a signal specialist; and a driver. The operations section employs the batteries to meet the needs of the supported units. It develops operational plans, orders, maintains the tactical situation maps, overlays, and coordinates tactical movements and positioning. The equipment includes one armored command post carrier (shared with the intelligence section) with three FM (AN/VRC-92A and AN/VRC90A) and one AM (AN/GRC-193) secure radio systems, and one HMMWV with a secure FM radio (AN/VRC90A).

Fire Direction Center

The fire direction writer is supervised by the battalion fire direction officer (FDO). It is staffed with a chief fire direction computer, a fire direction computer, and four fire direction specialists. The fire direction center has tactical control over and provides tactical fire direction to the batteries. Equipment includes one armored command post carrier with one AM (AN/GRC-193) and four FM (two each AN/VRC-92A) secure radio systems and MLRS FDS.

Intelligence Section

The intelligence section is supervised by the S2. It is staffed with the intelligence sergeant and a driver. The intelligence section provides intelligence and security information, develops the priority intelligence requirements (PIR) related to fire support, manages all attached field artillery target acquisition systems as well as Army, joint, and national sensor system down-links under the battalion's operational control, and coordinates with the S3 for survey support for attached target acquisition (TA) assets. The intelligence section processes and correlates targeting data to include predicting artillery target locations and passes this information to the controlling FA headquarters and the battalion FDC. The section monitors enemy artillery tactics and techniques, coordinates the battalion ground and air defense plans with the batteries, and nominates zone coverage, and cueing schedules for all attached radars. Equipment includes one HMMWV with secure FM radio (AN/VRC-90A). This section also uses the armored command post carrier and two of its radio systems organic to the operations section.

Liaison Section

The liaison section is supervised by the liaison officer (LNO). The two teams of the liaison section provide liaison to a reinforced FA headquarters when the battalion is assigned a mission of reinforcing (R) or general support reinforcing (GSR). They also augment existing FSEs if required. Two teams are necessary in order to accommodate frequent changes in tactical mission assignment adequately support joint and coalition forces, and provide liaison when supporting MAGTF operations or conducting TMD. Equipment includes one HMMWV with secure radios (ANVRC-92A), one PLGR, and one FDS per team.

Communications/Electronics (C/E) Section

The C/E section is responsible for the maintenance and repair of the battalion communications (comm) systems. This section attaches teams forward with firing batteries. Equipment includes four HMMWVs and one secure FM radio system (AN/VRC-90A).

Radio Section

The radio section establishes and maintains the FM retransmission station as required. Dual retransmission capability is essential to maintaining both FM voice and data communications over extended distances. Equipment includes one HMMWV with two secure FM retransmission radio systems (two each, AN/VRC-92A).

Personnel and Administration Center

The battalion personnel and administration center (PAC) is supervised by the battalion S1. It includes a personnel sergeant, a personnel administration supervisor, two clerks, a legal NCO, and a mail delivery clerk. It provides administrative and legal support and helps the battalion commander provide for the welfare of the battalion personnel. Equipment includes a cargo truck, and a facsimile (fax) machine.

Unit Ministry Team

The chaplain's assistant is the only member of the unit ministry team. His mission is to assist the unit chaplain in providing religious services and soldier welfare ministries. Equipment includes a HMMWV with secure FM radio (AN/VRC-90A).

Battalion Supply Section

The battalion supply section is supervised by the S4. It includes a property book officer, a senior maintenance supervisor, a supply sergeant, an assistant supply sergeant, a property book NCO, two petroleum tanker operators, and three supply specialists. The section coordinates the overall supply activities of the battalion and conducts supply operations in support of the HEM. It works closely with the operations section in monitoring the resupply of ammunition and fuel. Equipment includes a cargo truck, a HMMWV with FM radio (AN/VRC-90A), and a HEMTT fuel tanker.

Medical Section

Battalion medical support is provided by the medical section. This section includes the medical treatment team, ambulance team, and combat medic team.

Medical Treatment Team. Battalion medical activities are supervised by the battalion physician assistant. The medical treatment team includes an emergency treatment NCO and two medical specialists. The medical treatment team provides sick call, limited medical services, and emergency medical treatment for patients who must be evacuated. Equipment includes two HMMWVs, one secure FM radio (AN/VRC-90A), two chemically and biologically protected shelter systems (CBPS), and medical equipment sets for field trauma, field sick call, chemical agent patient decontamination, and chemical agent treatment.

Ambulance Team. The ambulance team consists of one evacuation NCO and an ambulance driver. This team supports the medical treatment team and the firing batteries in medical evacuation. Equipment includes one HMMWV ambulance with FM radio (AN/VRC-90A) and PLGR.

Combat Medic Team. This team consists of nine combat medical specialists. One combat medic is allocated per firing platoon. Each medic carries a surgical kit.

HHS Food Service Section

The HHS food service section is supervised by a senior food opns sergeant and includes a first cook and two cooks. The food service section provides food service support to all elements organic or attached to HHS. Equipment includes one cargo truck and a field kitchen trailer.

Battalion Maintenance Section

The battalion maintenance section falls under the responsibility of the battalion maintenance officer (BMO). The section includes a maintenance technician, battalion motor sergeant, and adequate mechanics and recovery specialists to provide scheduled maintenance and recovery to HHS (and the firing batteries, if required) and overflow automotive maintenance to firing batteries. The section also coordinates all external maintenance and maintenance supply with the intermediate direct support (DS) unit and maintenance support teams for the battalion. Equipment includes an armored maintenance vehicle, three cargo trucks, a HMMWV, four secure FM radios (AN/VRC-90A), a PLGR, a medium tracked recovery vehicle, and a HEMTT wrecker.

HHS Battery Maintenance Section

The HHS battery maintenance section is supervised by the motor sergeant and includes adequate mechanics and repair parts specialists to conduct on-site maintenance and equipment repair. This section maintains the PLL for HEM. Equipment includes a cargo truck and two HMMWVs with one secure FM radio (AN/VRC-88A).

MLRS Firing Batteries

The mission of the corps battalion MLRS firing batteries is to provide FA medium range rocket and long range missile fires in support of the corps, Army, theater, joint or coalition forces and MAGTFs or in the conduct of TMD to destroy, neutralize or suppress the enemy in accordance with Army depth and simultaneous attack doctrine. The corps battalion MLRS firing battery is organic to a FA battalion MLRS, TOE 06465L000 and may be further attached to a HHB, div arty, Marine artillery regiment, to coalition forces in support of multinational initiatives or to other controlling headquarters as required.

The mission of the divisional MLRS battery is to provide FA medium range rocket and long range missile fires in support of the division and coalition forces to destroy, neutralize or suppress the enemy in accordance with Army depth and simultaneous attack doctrine. The divisional MLRS battery is organic to a heavy division TOE 06300L and is further attached to a HHB div arty to coalition forces in support of multi-national initiatives, or to other controlling headquarters as required.

The MLRS firing batteries are organized similarly, whether assigned to a division or to an MLRS battalion. These firing batteries are structured for independent operations. The MLRS firing battery consists of a headquarters platoon, an ammunition (ammo) platoon, and three firing platoons (see Figure 2-3).

Battery Headquarters

The battery headquarters (HQ) consists of the commander, 1SG, an NBC NCO, and a vehicle driver. The divisional MLRS battery also has three combat medics and an administrative clerk. The battery headquarters command element (commander and 1SG) and the battery operations center (BOC) provide the necessary C3 and coordination of internal and external administrative and logistical support for the battery. Equipment includes two HMMWVs with secure FM radios (one AN/VRC-89A and one AN/VRC-90A), a FED, and a PLGR.

Battery Operations Center

The BOC is supervised by the operations officer. It is staffed with a fire direction computer, battery display operator, five fire direction specialists, a signal support systems specialist, and normally, the NBC NCO organic to the battery headquarters. The BOC plans, coordinates, and executes tactical movements, and positioning, maintains situation maps and overlays, and provides tactical fire direction for the battery. Equipment includes an armored command post carrier with one secure AM (AN/GRC-193A) and five secure FM (two AN/VRC-92A and one AN/VRC-90A) radio systems, and one FDS (AN/GYK-37).

Survey Section

This section consists of the PADS team chief and vehicle driver. It provides all survey support for the firing platoons under the control of the BOC. Equipment includes a HMMWV with FM radio (AN/VRC-90A), and PADS, a PLGR, and a theodolite.

Food Service Section

The battery food service section consists of a senior food operations sergeant, a first cook, and two cooks. It can draw, prepare, serve, and deliver rations (using the supply section HMMWVs) to the battery headquarters, the firing platoons, and the ammunition platoon. Equipment includes a cargo truck and a field kitchen trailer.

Supply Section

The supply section consists of the supply sergeant, four petroleum vehicle operators, an armorer, and three vehicle drivers. The supply section draws and issues all classes of supply except I, V, VIII, and IX. It can also transport and deliver these supplies to the three firing platoons. Equipment includes a cargo truck, three HMMWVs, and two HEMTT fuel tankers.

Maintenance Section

The battery maintenance section performs organizational automotive maintenance on all battery equipment except radio and electronic equipment. The section is organized and equipped to field on-site unit maintenance teams for equipment repair. The section maintains its own prescribed load list (PLL). It can draw, transport, and issue or install all organizational repair parts for the battery. The section is equipped with a wheeled wrecker and a tracked recovery vehicle each having a secure FM radio (AN/VRC-90A), an armored maintenance vehicle with secure FM radio (AN/VRC-88A), a HMMWV with secure FM radio (AN/VRC-90A), and three cargo trucks.

Ammunition Platoon

The platoon is comprised of a platoon headquarters and three ammo sections. The platoon headquarters includes a platoon leader, a platoon sergeant, and a driver. The three ammunition sections each have a section chief, an assistant section chief, and six ammunition specialists. The ammunition platoon provides Class V (rocket, missile, and small-aims ammunition) support to MLRS battery headquarters and the firing platoons. This includes coordination with supporting logistical headquarters for the divisional battery. The platoon has a HMMWV with secure FM radio (AN/VRC-89A) and twelve HEMTT/HEMAT truck and trailer combinations equipped with FM radios (AN/VRC-87A).

Firing Platoon Headquarters

Each firing platoon headquarters includes a platoon leader, a platoon sergeant, a reconnaissance sergeant, a battery display operator, a radio operator, and two fire direction specialists. The headquarters conducts platoon reconnaissance, surveillance, and occupation of position (RSOP) and performs all command, control, and logistical coordination functions for the platoon. The platoon may also perform tactical fire direction when required. Each platoon headquarters is equipped with an armored command post carrier with four FM radio systems (two each AN/VRC-92A), two HMMWVs with FM radio systems (one AN/VRC-90A and one AN/VRC-92A), a FDS (AN/GYK-37), and a PLGR.

Firing Section

Each firing section includes a section chief, a gunner, and a launcher driver. The firing section is responsible for tactically positioning the launcher for survivability and firing operations. The section performs all technical fire control, operator maintenance, and launcher organizational maintenance. Equipment includes the M270 launcher with dual FM radio system (AN/VRC-92A), and a PLGR.


Section II

DUTIES OF KEY PERSONNEL


MLRS Battalion

Although the duties of key personnel in the MLRS unit closely parallel those in other artillery units, they are unique in some ways. Generally, MLRS battalion and battery personnel are responsible for tasks performed by higher grades in cannon units. The discussions in this chapter cover the major duties of personnel in MLRS units. They are not intended to be all-inclusive but rather to highlight major functions unique to the system.

Battalion Commander. The battalion commander, aided by the battery commanders and staff, controls all the tactical, training, logistical, and administrative activities of the battalion. He directs employment of the battalion in accordance with assigned missions and the guidance from force FA headquarters. He works closely with the commanders of supported and supporting units to ensure that the battalion can accomplish its mission. He establishes policies to promote discipline and morale within the battalion.

Executive Officer. The XO directs, supervises, and ensures coordination of the staff sections. He oversees all logistical functions within the battalion, acts on behalf of the commander to direct the logistical support of the battalion, and commands the battalion in the absence of the commander.

S3 Officer. The S3 is responsible for operations, planning, and training within the battalion. Through the operations and fire direction sections, he provides tactical and fire direction control to the batteries. He directs the employment of the batteries to meet the needs of the supported units. He plans for the employment of the batteries and recommends the allocation of resources based on the current tactical situation and proposed future actions. He prepares and publishes command standing operating procedures (SOPs), operation plans (OPLANs), and operation orders (OPORDs). He is responsible for establishing and directing the battalion training plan.

S1 Officer. The S1 coordinates and directs the activities of the battalion PAC to ensure that the commander's policies, guidance, and orders for personnel administration are implemented. The S1 is the main staff advisor to the commander in the areas of personnel management, morale, discipline, and equal opportunity. He maintains the unit strength through requisition of new personnel and out processing of departing soldiers.

S2 Officer. The S2 supervises the intelligence section. He develops the priority intelligence requirements (PIR) related to fire support. He coordinates with the S3 for survey support for attached TA assets. He manages all attached field artillery target acquisition systems as well as army, joint, and national sensor system down-links under the battalion's operational control. He processes and correlates targeting data to include predicting artillery target locations and passes this information to the controlling FA headquarters and the battalion FDC. He monitors enemy artillery tactics and techniques. He coordinates the battalion ground and air defense plans with the batteries. He also nominates zone coverage, and cueing schedule for all attached or GS radars.

S4 Officer. The battalion S4 coordinates all logistical functions for the battalion. He is responsible for the continuous flow of all classes of supply (except Class VIII and IX) to the battalion. He identities the support requirements, provides them to the supporting unit, and coordinates with the supporting unit to ensure requirements are met. He recommends policies and procedures to increase unit logistic readiness posture. He provides guidance on the execution of logistics operations to the battery supply sections.

Liaison Officer (LNO). The LNO directs the liaison teams and represents the MLRS battalion commander with supported units. He advises the supported commander on battalion capabilities, limitations, and disposition. He recommends employment options and helps coordinate fires of the MLRS battalion with other fire support assets. He keeps the MLRS battalion commander informed on the current situation of the supported unit and on future requirements.

Fire Direction Officer. The battalion fire direction officer (FDO) is primarily responsible for supervising all tactical fire direction in the battalion. On the basis of guidance from the commander and S3, he decides where and how the battalion and any reinforcing units will fire. He is responsible for securing and supervising input of appropriate parameters into the FDS database. The FDO analyzes requested targets for attack by field artillery taking into account the desired effects, method of fire, and types of ammunition needed. He ensures complete dissemination of fire plans to subordinate elements. He conducts rehearsals of fire plans with subordinate and reinforcing firing units as well as attached acquisition assets and sensor system down links. He is responsible for establishing and maintaining data communications within the battalion, its attachments, and the controlling FA headquarters.

Battalion Operations Officer. The operations officer works directly for the S3 and is a tactical operations center (TOC) duty officer. He assists in developing OPORDs and OPLANs and maintains the tactical situation maps and overlays and plans and coordinates tactical movements and positioning. The operations officer develops the execution matrix which includes projected operation areas, a by-phase/event scheme of support and current fire support coordinating measures in effect.

Battalion Maintenance Officer. The BMO advises the commander and coordinates external maintenance support. He provides advice and expertise to the battalion and battery commanders. He recommends maintenance procedures and policies to facilitate support. He coordinates for maintenance and repair parts support from DS maintenance units and oversees the battalion maintenance section. The BMO monitors maintenance activities of the battalion. He is the primary advisor to the commander on all maintenance related activities.

Battalion Signal Officer (BSO). The BSO is the MLRS battalion commander's principal advisor on communications and signal operations. He has staff responsibility for establishing and maintaining all types of communication in the battalion. He integrates the battalion communications system into those of the supported force and force FA headquarters.

Chemical Officer. The chemical officer advises the commander and staff on NBC defense matters. He prepares the NBC portion of plans and orders and prepares NBC estimates and SOPs for defense against NBC attacks. He exercises staff supervision over NBC training throughout the battalion.

Chaplain. The battalion chaplain advises commanders on moral and ethical matters. He coordinates and conducts garrison and field services and soldier welfare ministries. He provides counseling as required for all soldiers and helps maintain the morale and spiritual well-being of all personnel.

Physician Assistant (PA). The PA advises the commander on all health-related issues. He is responsible for immediate medical services for field casualties within the battalion and coordinates all medical support with higher headquarters in coordination with the S3 and S1. He supervises the operations of the battalion medical treatment team.

HHS Commander. The HHS commander is responsible for maintaining personnel and equipment readiness within HHS battery. He ensures provision of supply, maintenance, food service, and administrative support for HHS elements. He must work closely with the staff officers, as most of the soldiers assigned to the battery work within the staff. He may conduct RSOPs for the battalion HQ and act as the battalion command post (CP) area commander.

Battalion Maintenance Technician. The battalion maintenance technician provides technical advice and expertise to the battalion and battery commanders. He coordinates for maintenance and repair parts support from DS maintenance units and supervises the battalion maintenance section in the absence of the BMO.

Property Book Officer. The property book officer (PBO) coordinates all supply activities in the battalion. He is responsible for maintaining property accountability and the battalion property book. He helps the battery supply sergeant's request and receives supplies by coordinating with supporting supply activities. He works closely with the Operations section in monitoring the resupply of ammunition and fuel. He supervises the battalion supply section in the absence of the S4.

Command Sergeant Major. The CSM is the senior NCO in the battalion. He executes established policies and enforces standards pertaining to performance, care, conduct, appearance, personnel management, and training of enlisted soldiers. The CSM provides advice and makes recommendations to the commander and staff on all matters pertaining to enlisted soldiers and their families. He assists in inspection of command activities, facilities, and personnel as prescribed by the commander.

HHS First Sergeant (1SG). The HHS 1SG is the senior NCO in the battery. He provides leadership and guidance to the battery's enlisted personnel. He is the primary administrative and logistics coordinator for the battery. He is responsible for all internal and external administrative and logistical duties.

MLRS Firing Battery

Battery Commander. The firing battery commander is responsible for executing the tactical mission given the battery by the force FA headquarters. He is responsible for maintaining discipline and morale within the battery. He ensures supply, maintenance, food service, and administrative support is provided for the unit.

Battery Operations Officer. The operations officer is, in effect, the S3 of the firing battery. He supervises the BOC, which is the command and control (C2) center of the battery. He keeps tactical situation maps and overlays: plans and coordinates tactical movement and positioning, with the commander's guidance; and processes intelligence information. He directs logistical efforts in coordination with the 1SG and ammo platoon leader or, if in use, with the battery logistics operations center (LOC). As the point of contact between the controlling artillery or maneuver headquarters and all battery elements, he informs the commander of all directives from higher headquarters, passes reports to higher headquarters when appropriate, and establishes and maintains communications with higher headquarters and all battery elements. He supervises the C2 of battery elements, according to the commander's guidance, and orchestrates the commander's guidance during all movements of the battery elements. He also supervises comm procedures and net discipline. His primary concern is with the tactical control of the battery.

The operations officer is also responsible for the operation of the FDC. Although he is not an FDO, he supervises the FDC chief computer's actions and is responsible for ensuring the timely transmittal of fire missions and other data to the batteries. He is concerned with selection of firing platoons to fire, fire support coordinating measures, status of the firing platoons, and ensuring the controlling FA headquarters has the most current platoon tactical information.

Ammunition Platoon Leader. The ammo platoon leader is usually the firing battery logistics officer with responsibility for coordinating all ammo resupply for the battery as well as all maintenance efforts. His responsibilities include ammo resupply operations for the supporting ammunition transfer point (ATP) or ammunition supply point (ASP), positioning the ammo platoon elements within the battery ammunition holding area (AHA), and establishing communications. Normally, he performs the duties of battery motor officer. As such, he coordinates with the bn/div arty administrative and logistical operations center (ALOC) and/or the BOC for maintenance support and directs all maintenance efforts. Through the BOC, he keeps the commander informed of the maintenance situation. The Ammo Platoon leader must coordinate with the BOC/bn/div arty ALOC to plan for centralized ammo resupply of the firing platoons and convoys to the ATP or ASP. If the distance to resupply points is great, he may have to arrange for refueling, rations, approval of the route, and intelligence information for the convoy. He coordinates with the BOC to keep the commander informed of the battery ammo status and the status of the ammo platoon elements. If ammo resupply has been decentralized, the firing platoon leader will coordinate with the BOC and supervise resupply operations within his platoon. The ALOC will still be used to coordinate with the bn/div arty ALOC.

In divisional MLRS batteries, the duties of the ammunition platoon leader are larger in scope. He works closely with the div arty XO, S-4, and the division main support battalion (MSB) in the coordination of logistical support for the battery.

Firing Platoon Leader. The firing platoon leader is responsible for the tactical control of the firing platoon. He reconnoiters and selects platoon operational areas (OPAREAs) on the basis of guidance from the BOC and battery commander. He selects the location of the platoon HQ, OPAREA rendezvous point, reload points (RL), AHAs, and initial firing areas. These positions should enhance platoon survivability and communications between the platoon HQ and the deployed launchers.

The firing platoon leader selects the location of the platoon survey control points (SCPs). If the SCPs are not established by PADS, he establishes survey control by the use of alternate methods of survey (see Chapter 4).

The platoon leader should carry his own survey stakes and tags, whether or not he uses an alternate method of survey, to mark his positions if he arrives before PADS. This will enable him to mark specific points and continue to perform his reconnaissance. When PADS arrives, the platoon leader can brief the location of the stakes so the survey NCO can mark the points with more precise survey.

The firing platoon leader designates platoon launchers for firing selected munitions. He also designates the operational status of the launchers and determines their employment sequence on the basis of guidance from the commander, the BOC, and mission requirements. He then sends this information to the BOC, and the BOC selects the launchers to fire.

He establishes communication with the BOC and ensures that the BOC is informed of the status of the platoon. He supervises and assigns missions to the platoon recon sergeant.

The firing platoon leader and platoon sergeant coordinate the maintenance effort within the platoon. They ensure operator unit-level FCS and LLM maintenance is performed. They control any DS level FCS and LLM mechanic maintenance support teams (MSTs) assigned to the platoon. They may request additional maintenance support when needed.

First Sergeant. The firing battery 1SG is the senior NCO in the battery. He provides leadership and guidance to the battery's enlisted personnel. He is the primary administrative and logistics coordinator for the battery. He is responsible for all internal and external administrative and logistical duties, with the exception of rocket/missile ammunition and maintenance. His principal duties in this area include the following:

  • Coordinating with the controlling headquarters to determine the location and status of support activities. These activities include the supporting maintenance activity; nearest water and ration distribution point; nearest petroleum oils and lubricants (POL) distribution point; supporting shower and laundry points; and supporting Class II and Class VII activities.
  • Guiding and supervising internal battery support activities, such as battery supply, maintenance, and food service operations.
  • Directly supervising the battery clerk (divisional battery) and combat medic.
  • Coordinating with the BOC and LOC for overall battery administrative and logistics support of the firing platoons.
  • Ensuring the above support is timely, adequate, and consolidated as much as possible.
  • Developing and supervising the battery defense.

Ammunition Platoon Sergeant. The ammo platoon sergeant is the primary assistant to the ammo platoon leader. He selects and reconnoiters routes to and from the ATP and ASP, directs and commands convoy movements of ammo vehicles, and coordinates with the division ammo officer for all Class V resupply. If the battery is assigned to a battalion, the S4 may coordinate with the division ammunition officer (DAO). If a LOC is being used, he helps the ammo platoon leader supervise it. He keeps the ammunition document register and accountability files.

Firing Platoon Sergeant. The firing platoon sergeant supervises the platoon HQ, including operations with the platoon FDS. He ensures that all reports submitted to the BOC are accurate and timely; and, in the platoon OPAREA, he controls the ammo vehicles and monitors ammo resupply. He must be prepared to reconnoiter firing points, reload points, and AHAs. He maintains the status of launcher sections; plans and coordinates the defense of the platoon elements; and assists the platoon leader in command, control, and execution of the platoon mission.

Fire Direction Computer. The fire direction computer is the primary assistant to the operations officer. He directly supervises the FDC and FDC operations. He organizes the BOC for 24-hour operation, directs its setup, and controls the battery radio nets. In coordination with the operations officer, he monitors all radio transmissions and ensures that all pertinent information and fire missions are quickly relayed to the proper agencies. He maintains the fire direction capabilities map, supervises upkeep of FDC operations records and reports, and keeps the operations officer informed.

Firing Section Chief. The firing section chief is responsible for all activities involving the launcher. This includes selecting the hide area and refining firing point in accordance with guidance given by the platoon leader/sergeant. He ensures the launcher is properly emplaced and prepared for action. He measures and reports immediate mask to the firing platoon HQ. He observes and checks the functioning of equipment during firing, movement, and reload operations. He immediately reports errors, unusual incidents, or equipment malfunctions to platoon HQ.

Battery Motor Sergeant. The battery motor sergeant supervises the battery maintenance section and provides technical guidance to the soldiers in the accomplishment of their duties.

Supply Sergeant. The battery supply sergeant directs supply personnel in establishing supply and inventory control management functions. He maintains property under standard property book system (SPBS); reviews daily and monthly records of issues of petroleum products and operating supplies; provides technical assistance to equipment records and parts specialist; and assists and advises supply officer and commander.

Senior Food Operations Sergeant. The battery senior food operations sergeant supervises shift, unit, or consolidated food service operations in field or garrison environments. He establishes operating and work procedures, inspects food preparation/storage areas, and dining facility personnel. He determines subsistence requirements, and requests, receives, and accounts for subsistence items.

NBC NCO. The NBC NCO provides training, advice, and supervision regarding the proper use and maintenance procedures for chemical equipment and chemical operations.



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