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PUTTING AN EYE IN WIRE ROPE

12-99. This paragraph discusses how to put both a temporary eye and a permanent eye in wire rope. A temporary eye can be put in wire rope by using wire rope clips or by using a field expedient known as a "hasty eye" or "Molly Hogan" splice. A Liverpool splice is the accepted method for putting a permanent eye in the end of a wire rope. With the proper equipment, and a bit of practice, a Liverpool splice can be put in wire rope in less than 15 minutes.
TOOLS USED FOR SPLICING
12-100. Except for the knife, Figure 12-38 shows the tools needed for splicing. Use the marlinespike for opening the strands in the standing part of the wire rope and for working the strands to be spliced into the standing part. Use the wire cutters for cutting the strands after the splice is complete. Use the hydraulic wire rope cutter to cut the length of wire rope that will be spliced. Use a thimble to keep the wires from moving and the vise from crushing them when a soft eye is made. An eye splice can be made with or without a thimble. Always use a thimble whenever an eye splice is put in unless special circumstances prohibit it. The thimble protects the wire rope from sharp bends and abrasive action. The efficiency of a well-made splice with a heavy-duty thimble varies from 70 to 90 percent. After splicing the soft eye, remove the thimble. When an eye is to have a thimble as a permanent part, the thimble is the size of the eye desired.
TEMPORARY EYE USING WIRE ROPE CLIPS
12-101. A temporary eye may be put in wire by using wire rope clips. Figure 12-39 shows the correct and incorrect ways of using these clips. The U-bolt always goes over the bitter end and the roddle on the standing part. Space the clips apart at a distance equal to six times the diameter of the wire. After a rope is under strain, tighten the clips again. On operating ropes, tighten the clips every few hours and inspect the rope carefully. Inspect at points on the rope where there are clips. Pay particular attention to the wire at the clip farthest from the eye, because vibration and whipping are dampened here and fatigue breaks are likely to occur.


Figure 12-38. Selected Components of Rigger's Cargo Set


Figure 12-39. Correct and Incorrect Use of Wire Clips

12-102. To obtain maximum strength from the temporary eye, use the correct size and number of wire clips. Size is stamped on the roddle between the two holes. The correct number of clips to use for various sizes of wire ropes is shown in Figure 12-40.

12-103. Or use the following formula:

    3 X diameter of rope + 1 =
    number of clips (round off)
12-104. Correct spacing between clips is:

    6 X diameter of rope =
    correct spacing (inches)

SIZE OF ROPE

NUMBER

(INCHES)

OF CLIPS

   

1/2

2

5/8

3

3/4

3

7/8

4

1

4

1 1/8

5

1 1/4

5

1 1/2

6

   

Figure 12-40. Size and Number of Wire Clips

12-105. The improved type of wire rope clip shown in Figure 12-41 has a few advantages over the older type. Both halves are identical and provide a bearing surface for both parts of the rope. Therefore, it cannot be put on wrong and it does not distort the wire. It also allows a full swing with a wrench.


Figure 12-41. Improved Type of Wire Rope Clip

THE HASTY EYE ("MOLLY HOGAN") SPLICE
12-106. Sometimes it becomes necessary to construct a field expedient, called the hasty eye or "Molly Hogan" splice. This splice can be easily and quickly made, but it is limited to about 70 percent of the strength of the wire rope. Never use this splice to lift heavy loads. Use this splice only when working with preformed wire rope. To make this splice, do the following steps.
  • Step 1. Using a marlinespike, screwdriver, or if necessary, a nail; separate the wire rope into two three-strand sections. These sections should be unlaid four times the diameter of the desired eye. If you want a 1-foot diameter eye, unlay the sections back 4 feet (Figure 12-42).
  • Step 2. Use the two sections to form a loop of the desired diameter for the eye. Then, lay the strands back around each other to form the eye (Figure 12-43).
  • Step 3. After the strands have been laid back around each other and the eye has been formed, seize the wire to complete the splice (Figure 12-44).


Figure 12-42. Making a Hasty Eye (Molly Hogan)
Splice, Step 1

Figure 12-43. Making a Hasty Eye
(Molly Hogan) Splice, Step 2


Figure 12-44. Making a Hasty Eye
(Molly Hogan) Splice, Step 3

THE LIVERPOOL SPLICE
12-107. The Liverpool splice is the easiest and most common of the wire splices make. It is the primary splice used when a permanent eye is required.

12-108. To find the distance the strands should be unlaid for an eye splice, multiply the diameter of the wire by 36 inches. (Example: 5/8-inch wire rope--5/8 X 36/1 = 180/8 = 22 1/2 or 23 inches.) Measure off that distance on the wire rope and put a seizing at that point.

12-109. Next, cut the end seizing and carefully unlay the strands. Whip the ends of each strand with either sail twine or friction tape.

12-110. Form the desired size eye and put the eye in the rigger's vise with the unlaid strands to your right as you face the vise. Stretch out the standing part of the wire, clamp and lash it, and you are ready to start.

Note: When splicing wire, always insert the marlinespike against the lay of the wire, and make sure not to shove it through the core. The core must be on the left-hand side of the spike.
Making the First Tuck of Strands One, Two, and Three
12-111. In the Liverpool splice (Figure 12-45) the first strand goes under three strands, the second strand goes in the same place but only under two strands, and number three strand goes in the same opening but only under one strand. All of the strands go in at the same point, but come out at different places.

12-112. Then, run the spike behind the three strands under which the first three are tucked, but above the first three strands as tucked. Holding the marlinespike at a 90-degree angle to the standing part, turn the spike counterclockwise about one fourth of a turn and insert the core through the standing part. This is called "dipping the core." Make sure that the core is inserted under the marlinespike. Pull the core down and run it down into the splice.


Figure 12-45. Tucking Strands of a Liverpool Splice

Tucking Strands Four, Five, and Six
12-113. Remember that the core was between strands three and four and that the strands are numbered clockwise. To tuck strand four, put the marlinespike under the strand to the left of where one, two, and three were tucked through the standing part. Turn the marlinespike counterclockwise around the standing part and tuck the strand. Pull it tight and run it down with the spike. Tuck strand four around the same strand four times. Lock each tuck in place by holding the strand down and running the spike up.

12-114. Push the marlinespike under the next higher strand on the standing part and tuck strand five around it four times, using the same procedure as with strand four. Then tuck strand six four times. This completes strands four, five, and six.
Running the Core Up
12-115. Burying the core in the center of the splice in the standing part is called "running the core up." Not the entire core is run up and the excess is cut off. This is done before strands one, two, and three are tucked three more times.

12-116. Run the spike under the same three strands under which strand one was passed. With the spike in your left hand and the core in your right hand, move the spike to the left and down, and pull up the core with your right hand to tighten. Then move the spike back to the right. Run up the core into the center of the splice and cut off the excess.
Tucking Strands One, Two, and Three
12-117. To avoid kinking the strands on the last tucks, insert the spike and run it up the wire. Follow the spike up with the strand, shove it under the spike, and pull taut. Keeping a strain on the strand, work the spike and strand back around and down together. Hold the strand there and work the spike back up the wire. Follow up with the strand and take the last tuck. Work the strand back down and hold it there. Before pulling out the spike, run it back up until the strands of the standing wire bind the working strand in place (see also Figure 12-46). Make the second and third tucks with the remaining strands in the same way.


Figure 12-46. How to Avoid a Kink

Completing a Splice
12-118. The recommended order for finishing the splice is to tuck strands three, two, and one. Each is tucked three times in a row, ending up with a total of four tucks each. Remove the wire from the vise, take a hammer and pound the splice into shape, and cut off the ends of the tucking strands close to the splice.

SPLICING 2-IN-1 DOUBLE-BRAIDED NYLON LINE (Samson 2-in-1 Braid-Splicing Principles)

12-119. Double-braided nylon has a braided core inside a braided cover. It is commonly called 2-in-1 braided nylon line. Special tools and procedures are required to splice this type of line.

12-120. The following describes the procedures for making the standard eye splice and the end-for-end splice. The Samson Cordage Works developed both splices and the line that are used. The following information is used with permission and through the courtesy of Samson Ocean Systems, Inc., Boston, Massachusetts.
SPECIAL TERMS
12-121. Refer to the following terms when making the standard eye splice and the end-for-end splice.
  • Tubular fid. The hollow steel tool used for cover and core insertions (see Figure 12-47).
  • Metal wire fid. For line over 1 inch diameter (see Figure 12-48).
  • One fid length. The full length of one tubular fid; two full lengths of a wire fid.
  • Short section of fid. Distance away from open end to the scribe marks on body of fid. Approximately 35 percent of the full fid length.
  • Pusher. Ice-pick-like tool used to extract core from cover and to aid in sliding fid through rope elements (see Figure 12-49).
  • Eye. The closed loop formed at the end of rope as a result of splicing.
  • Crossover. The point of intersection of cover and core created during splicing.
  • Milking. The intermittent squeezing-pulling-sliding movement of the hand used to bring cover over core in forming splice.
  • Smooth Out. To "milk" the slack out of a particular section during the splicing process.
  • Point X. The extraction point; place on cover from where the core is initially extracted.
  • Point R. The reference point; the mark made after measuring one fid length from taped end of cover.
  • Point T. The point from which the taper count is measured.
  • Point Z. The point on the cover from which the core tail will emerge; located one-half fid below point X.
  • Strand. The strand of a braid is a group of one or more plied yarn ends, which make up one stich or pic. The usual number of cover strands in a Samson braid is 16, 20, 24, or 32. (Note: Since most Samson braid covers have two ends per strand, they are referred to in the splicing book as strand pairs.)
  • End. An end is a plied yarn component of a braid strand. In a cover strand one to four ends are found. In a core strand two to six ends can be found.
Note: On many Samson 2-in-1 braids, it is possible to distinguish between the cover and core as follows: The cover has a light blue tracer strand while the core has no visible tracer strand.


Figure 12-47. Tublar Fid


Figure 12-48. Metal Wire Fid


Figure 12-49. Pusher

SPECIAL TOOLS AND TECHNIQUES
12-122. The following are the special tools and techniques needed when making the standard eye splice.
For Splice With Thimble
12-123. STEP 1 in the procedure for the standard eye splice, paragraph 12-133, tells how to determine eye size.

12-124. Minimum eye and eye sling length with 2-in-1 braid is five fid lengths from extraction Mark X to extraction Mark X, regardless of rope diameter. The size of eye does not affect the minimum length (see Figure 12-50).

12-125. Exact overall lengths with eye splices are determined by allowing for extra rope to be used in making the splices. For each splice, the length of extra rope is equal to one and one-half fid lengths plus one-half the circumference of the eye.

12-126. When burying exposed core as in STEP 8, bury to crossover and insert thimble into eye before milking cover all the way. When using a thimble with ears, as in STEP 5, insert core through the rings (ears) and slide thimble beyond Mark 3 before inserting cover into core. Proceed to make the splice according to instructions.

Note: Before final burying, slide thimble around to cover side of eye.


Figure 12-50. Minimum Lengths for Standard Eye Splice

12-127. To secure finished eye tightly around thimble, either whip throat or dip the eye in hot water for several minutes. Hot water will shrink eye tightly around thimble.

12-128. Minimum endless loop (grommet) with 2-in-1 braid is 10 fid lengths between extraction Mark X to extraction Mark X, regardless of rope diameter. Proceed to make the end-for-end splice as shown in Figure 12-51.
For Line Less Than 1-Inch Diameter (3-Inch Circumference)
12-129. Each size line requires a different size of tubular fid. Use the fid, along with the pusher, to insert the cover into the core and vice versa. Also use the fid as a measuring device. The scribe marks indicate the short section of the fid.
For Line Larger Than 1-Inch Diameter (3-Inch Circumference)
12-130. Use only a metal wire fid for splicing larger lines (a pusher is not needed). As with the tubular fid, there are different sizes of wire fids for each size of line. Cover and center measurements are made with the wire fid in the same manner as the tubular fids.


Figure 12-51. Minimum Lengths for End-for-End Splice

12-131. Tightly tape end of braided cover or center after extraction (STEP 2 of splicing procedure). Press prongs of fid into cover or center just behind tape.

12-132. Tape wire fid to braid by wrapping tape in a tight, smooth, spiral, starting on the braid and wrapping in the direction of the round tip of the fid. Keep tape smooth to ease the fid through braid. The round end of the fid can then be inserted and pushed through without a pusher.
STANDARD EYE SPLICE
12-133. This Samson eye splice is for new line only. It retains about 90 percent of the average new line strength.
  • STEP 1 -- Marking the measurements. Tape end to be spliced with one thin layer of tape. Then measure one tubular fid length (two wire fid lengths because wire fid is one-half size) from end of line and mark. This is point R (see Figure 12-52). From R, form a loop the size of the eye desired and mark. This is point X (where you extract core from inside the cover). If using a thimble, form the loop around the thimble. Tie a tight slip knot about five fid lengths from point X. THIS MUST BE DONE. If you require the line with the finished splice(s) to be a certain overall length, see paragraph 12-125.


Figure 12-52. Marking the Measurements (Step 1)

  • STEP 2 -- Extract the core. Bend the line sharply at point X. With the pusher or any sharp tool such as an ice pick, an awl, or a marlinespike, spread the cover strands to expose the core. Pry and then pull the core completely out of the cover from point X to the taped end of the line. Put one layer only of tape on end of the core (see Figure 12-53).
Note: DO NOT pull cover strands away from line when spreading as this will distort rope unnecessarily.


Figure 12-53. Extracting the Core (Step 2)

Holding the exposed core, slide cover as far back towards the tightly tied slip knot as you can. Then, firmly smooth the cover back from the slip knot towards taped end. Smooth again until all cover slack is removed. Then, mark the core where it comes out of the cover; this is Mark 1.
  • STEP 3 -- Marking the core. Again, slide cover toward slip knot to expose more core. From Mark 1 following the core towards point X, measure a distance equal to the short section of tubular fid (two short sections with wire fid) and make two heavy marks. This is Mark 2. From Mark 2, measure in the same direction one fid length plus another short section of the fid (with wire fid, double measurements). Make three heavy marks for Mark 3 (see Figure 12-54).


Figure 12-54. Marking the Core (Step 3)

  • STEP 4 -- Marking the cover for tapering. Note nature of cover braid. It is made up of strands -- either one or two (pair). By inspection, you can see half the strands revolve to the right around rope and half revolve to the left. Beginning at point R and working toward the taped end of the cover, count eight consecutive strands (single or pairs) which revolve to the right (or left). MARK THE EIGHTH STRAND. This is point T (see Figure 12-55). Mark point T completely around cover. Starting at point T and working toward the taped cover end, count and mark every fifth right and left strand (single or paired) until you have progressed down to end of taped cover.


Figure 12-55. Marking the Cover for Tapering

  • STEP 5 -- Putting the cover inside the core. Insert fid into core at Mark 2. Slide it through and out at Mark 3. Add extra tape to cover end; then jam it tightly into the hollow end of fid (see Figure 12-56). Hold core lightly at Mark 3, place pusher point into taped end, and push fid and cover through from Mark 2 and out at Mark 3. Press prongs of wire fid into cover. Then tape over them. After the fid is on, milk braid over fid while pulling fid through from Mark 2 to Mark 3. Take the fid off the cover. Continue pulling cover tail through the core until point R on the cover emerges from Mark 3. Then remove tape from end of cover.


Figure 12-56. Putting the Cover Inside the Core

  • STEP 6 -- Performing the taper. Make sure tape is removed from cover end. Starting with the last marked pair of cover strands toward the end, cut and pull them completely out (see Figure 12-57). Cut and remove next marked strands and continue with each right and left marked strands until you reach point T. DO NOT cut beyond this point (see Figure 12-57). The result should be a gradual taper ending in a point. Very carefully pull cover back through core until point T emerges from Mark 2 of core.


Figure 12-57. Performing the Taper

  • STEP 7 -- Reinserting the core into the cover. From point X on cover, measure approximately one-half fid length toward slip knot on line and mark this as point Z (see Figure 12-58). You are now ready to put core back into cover from point T to point Z. Insert fid at point T. Jam the taped core end tightly into end of fid. With pusher push fid and core through cover "tunnel," past point X, to and through cover at point Z. When using wire fid, attach fid to taped core. After fid is on, milk braid over fid while pulling through from point T to point Z. When pushing fid past point X to point Z, make sure fid does not catch any internal core strands.
Note: Depending on eye size, fid may not be long enough to reach from point T to point Z in one pass. If not, bring fid out through cover, pull core through and reinsert fid into exact hole it came out. Do this as many times as needed to reach point Z.


Figure 12-58. Reinserting the Core Into the Cover

  • STEP 8 -- Marking the reduced volume tail core. Alternately pull on core tail at point Z, then pull on tapered cover at Mark 3. Tighten the crossover until it is about equal to the diameter of the line (see Figure 12-59). Smooth out cover of eye completely, from crossover at point T toward point X, to get all slack out of eye area. MARK CORE TAIL THROUGH COVER AT POINT X. Pull core tail out until mark on core just made is exposed at point Z. Reduce core volume at this point by cutting and removing one strand at each group, progressing around the circumference of the rope (see Figure 12-59). Measure one-third fid length from start of reduction cuts toward end and mark. Cut off remaining tail at this point. Make cut on a 45o angle to prevent a blunt end (see insert). With one hand, hold crossover--Mark T. Smooth cover section of eye out firmly and completely from crossover toward X; tapered core tail should disappear into cover at point Z. Smooth out core section from crossover towards Mark 3 and cover taper will disappear into core.


Figure 12-59. Marking the Reduced Volume Tail Core

  • STEP 9 -- Burying the exposed core. Hold rope at slip knot and with other hand milk cover toward splice, gently at first, then more firmly (see Figure 12-60). Cover will slide over Mark 3, Mark 2, the crossover, and point T and point R. (It may be necessary to occasionally smooth out eye during milking to prevent tapered tail from catching in throat of splice.) If bunching occurs at crossover preventing full burying, smooth cover from point T to point X. Grasp crossover at point T with one hand and then firmly smooth cover slack (female side of eye) with other hand towards throat point X. Repeat as necessary until bunching disappears. Continue milking until all cover slack between knot and throat of eye has been removed.


TIP: Do the following before burying the cover over the crossover:
    -- Anchor loop of slip knot by tying it to stationary object before starting to bury. You can then use both hands and weight of body to more easily bury cover over core and crossover (last two views in illustration).

    -- Hold the crossover tightly and milk all the excess cover from point R to point X.

    Flex and loosen the line at the crossover point during the final burying process. Hammering cover at point X will help loosen strands. With larger ropes it is helpful to securely anchor slip knot, attach a small line to the braided core at the crossover and mechanically apply tension with either a block and tackle, capstan, come-a-long, or power winch. Tension will reduce diameter of core and crossover for easier burying (last view in illustration).


Figure 12-60. Burying the Exposed Core

  • STEP 10 -- Finish the eye splice with lockstitch. Lockstitch splices to prevent noload opening due to mishandling. Use about one fid length of nylon or polyester whipping twine, about the same size as the strands in the line you are lockstitching. You may also use the same strands cut from the line you are lockstitching (see Figure 12-61).


Figure 12-61. Finishing the Eye Splice With Lockstitch

  • STEP 11 -- Continue lockstitching. Continue to reinsert as shown in Figure 12-62 until you have at least three complete stitches.


Figure 12-62. Continuing Lockstitching

  • STEP 12 -- Complete lockstitching. Rotate spliced part of line 90 degrees and reinsert end A into splice area in the same fashion as before. Make sure you do not pull stitching too tight. Complete last stitch so that end A comes out through the same opening in the braid as end B. Tie them together with a square knot and reinsert back ends into braid between cover and core as shown in Figure 12-63.


Figure 12-63. Completing Lockstitching

The splice will now be stitched on two planes perpendicular to each other. Configuration of cross section after completion is shown in Figure 12-64.


Figure 12-64. Cross Section Configuration

END-FOR-END SPLICE
12-134. The Samson standard end-for-end splice can be done on new and used line (see Figure 12-65). This is an all-purpose splice technique designed for people who splice used line as frequently as new line. It retains up to 85 percent of average new line strength and up to 85 percent of the remaining used line strength.


Figure 12-65. Standard End-for-End Splice

  • STEP 1 -- Marking the measurements. Tape the end of each line with one thin layer of tape. Lay two lines to be spliced side by side and measure one tubular fid length (two wire fid lengths) from end of each line and make a mark. This is point R (see Figure 12-66). From point R measure one short fid section length and mark again. This is point X where you should extract core from inside the cover. Be sure both lines are identically marked. Tie a tight slip knot about five fid lengths from point X. If you require the line with the finished splice to be a certain overall length, refer to Special Tools and Techniques, paragraph 12-122.


Figure 12-66. Marking the Measurements

  • STEP 2 -- Extracting the cores. Bend line sharply at point X. With the pusher or any sharp tool such as an ice pick, an awl, or a marlinespike, spread cover strands to expose core. First pry, then pull core completely out of cover from point X to the end of the line. Put only one layer of tape on end of core (see Figure 12-67). To be sure of correct positioning of Mark 1, do the following: Holding the exposed core, slide cover as far back towards the tightly tied slip knot as you can. Then, firmly smooth cover back from the slip knot towards taped end. Smooth again until all cover slack is removed. Then, mark core where it comes out of cover. This is Mark 1. Do this to both lines.


Figure 12-67. Extracting the Cores

  • STEP 3 -- Marking the cores. Hold one core at Mark 1 and slide cover back to expose more core (see Figure 12-68). From Mark 1 and following the core towards point X, measure a distance equal to the short section of fid and make two heavy marks. This is Mark 2. Measure one fid length plus another short section from Mark 2 in the same direction and make three heavy marks. This is Mark 3. Mark second core by laying it alongside the first and using it as an exact guide.


Figure 12-68. Marking the Cores

  • STEP 4 -- Marking the cover for tapering. Note nature of the cover braid (see Figure 12-69). It is made up of strands. On inspection you can see that half the strands revolve to the right around the line and half revolve to the left. Beginning at point R and working toward the taped end of cover, count eight consecutive pairs of cover strands, which revolve to the right (or left). Mark the eighth pair. This is point T (see insert). Make Mark T go completely around cover. Starting at point T and working toward taped cover end, count and mark every second right pair of strands for a total of six. Again, starting at point T, count and mark every second left pair of strands for a total of six (see insert). Mark both lines identically.


Figure 12-69. Marking the Cover for Tapering

  • STEP 5 -- Performing the taper. Remove tape from cover end. Starting with last marked pair of cover strands toward the end, cut and pull them completely out (see Figure 12-70). Cut and remove next marked strands and continue with each right and left marked strands until you reach point T. Do not cut beyond this point (see Figure 12-70). Retape tapered end. Cut and remove marked strands on the other marked cover, again stopping at point T. Retape tapered end.


Figure 12-70. Performing the Taper

  • STEP 6 -- Repositioning the lines.Reposition lines for splicing as shown in Figure 12-71. Note how cover of one line has been paired off with core of the opposite line. Avoid twisting.


Figure 12-71. Repositioning the Lines

  • STEP 7 -- Putting the cover inside core. Insert fid into one core at Mark 2 and bring it out at Mark 3. Add extra tape to tapered cover end and jam it tightly into hollow end of fid (see Figure 12-72). Hold core lightly at Mark 3, place pusher point into tapered end, pushing fid with cover in it from Mark 2 out at Mark 3. When using wire fid, attach fid to cover. Then pull fid through from Mark 2 to Mark 3. Pull cover tail through core until Mark T on cover meets Mark 2 on core. Insert other cover into core in same manner.


Figure 12-72. Putting the Cover Inside Core

  • STEP 8 -- Reinserting the core into cover. Now put core back into cover from point T to point X (see Figure 12-73). Insert fid at point T, jam taped core tightly into end of fid. With pusher push fid and core through cover, bringing out at Point X. When using wire fid, attach fid to taped core. Then pull fid and braid through from point T to point X. Do this to both cores. Remove tape from end of cover. Bring crossover up tight by pulling on core tail and on tapered covered tail. Hold crossover tightly, smoothing out all excess braid away from crossover in each direction. Trim end of tapered cover on an angle to eliminate blunt end. Tapered cover tail will disappear at Mark 3. Cut core tail off at an angle close to point X.


Figure 12-73. Reinserting the Core Into Cover

  • STEP 9 -- Burying the exposed core. Hold line at slip knot and with other hand milk cover toward the splice, gently at first and then more firmly (see Figure 12-74). The cover will slide over Mark 3, Mark 2, the crossover, and point R. Repeat with the other side of the splice. Continue burying until all cover slack between the knot and the splice has been removed.


Figure 12-74. Burying the Exposed Core

  • STEP 10 -- Finishing the splice. The splice is done when all cover slack has been removed and there is an opening in the splice about equal in length to the diameter of line (see Figure 12-75). If one side of the splice at the opening is noticeably longer than the other side, something is wrong. Check steps 1 through 9 and remake if necessary. Now untie the slip knots.


Figure 12-75. Finishing the Splice

 



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