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APPENDIX D

ESSENTIAL ELEMENTS OF INFORMATION (EEI)

The critical items of information or intelligence required to plan and execute an operation are the essential elements of information. These elements are developed at the battalion and higher echelons based on mission and situation. EEI are classified according to classification guidance for the operation, and priorities are designated for each item of information. The EEI are then forwarded through intelligence channels for fulfillment.

The following EEI lists serve as a reminder of critical items to consider for terminal and beach operations. The checklists give an idea of what information is required to plan marine and terminal operations.

NOTE: Port or beach EEI is used depending on the specific operation. All operations require the use of lines of communication (LOC) EEI and threat EEI. Town EEI is used for all villages, towns, or cities at or near the area of operations.

PORT EEI CHECKLIST

GENERAL

  • Map sheet number (series, sheet, edition, and date).

  • Nautical chart number.

  • Grid coordinates and longitude/latitude.

  • Military port capacity and method of capacity estimation.

  • Dangerous or endangered marine or land animals in the area.

  • Names, titles, and addresses of port authority and agent personnel.

  • Nearest US consul.

  • Port regulations.

  • Current tariffs.

  • Frequencies, channels, and call signs of the port's harbor control.

  • Complete description of the terrain within 25 miles of the port.

  • Location of nearest towns (see town EEI), airports, and military installations.

HARBOR

  • Types of harbor.

  • Lengths and location of breakwaters.

  • Depth, length and width in the fairway.

  • Current speed and direction in the fairway.

  • Size and depth of the turning basin.

  • Location and description of navigational aids.

  • Pilotage procedures required.

  • Location and degree of silting.

  • Size, frequency, and effectiveness of dredging operations.

  • Description of the port's dredger.

  • Description of sandbars or reefs in the area.

  • Identity of any marine plants that could inhibit movement of ships or lighterage.

  • Composition of the harbor bottom (percentage).

WEATHER AND HYDROGRAPHY

  • Types of weather conditions encountered in the area.

  • Times when these conditions occur.

  • Prevailing wind direction per calendar quarter.

  • Per calendar quarter, percentage of time for wind speed within 1 to 6 knots, 7 to 16 knots, and over 17 knots.

  • Maximum, minimum, and average precipitation per month to the nearest tenth of an inch.

  • Maximum, minimum, and average surface air temperature per month.

  • Frequency, duration, and density of fog and dust.

  • Effects of weather on the terrain.

  • Effects of weather on sea vessel travel.

  • Effects of weather on logistical operations (such as off-loading materials on vehicles and/or rails).

  • Seasonal climatic conditions that would inhibit port operations for prolonged periods (24 hours or more).

  • Type and mean range of the tide.

  • Direction and speed of the current.

  • Minimum and maximum water temperature.

  • Per calendar quarter, percentage of time that surf is within 0 to 4 feet, 4 to 6 feet, 6 to 9 feet, and over 9 feet.

  • Per calendar quarter, percentage of time that swells are within 0 to 4 feet, 4 to 6 feet, 6 to 9 feet, and over 9 feet.

ANCHORAGES

  • Direction and true bearing from release point (RP) of all anchorages.

  • Maximum and minimum depth for each anchorage.

  • Current speed and direction at each anchorage.

  • Radius of each anchorage.

  • Bottom material and holding characteristic of each anchorage.

  • Exposure condition of each anchorage.

  • Offshore and/or nearshore obstacles, what they are, and their distance and true bearing from the port.

PIERS

  • Type (wooden, concrete), length and width and present condition of piers located along shoreline.

  • Type of location equipment on piers that may be used to off-load cargo.

  • Number and types of vessels that piers can accommodate at one time.

  • Safe working load level of the pier (can support 60-, 100-, and 150-ton vehicles and/or equipment).

  • Water depth alongside and leading to the piers.

  • Services available (such as water, fuel, and electricity).

  • Available pier storage.

  • Specialized facilities available for the discharge of RO/RO vessels (such as ramps).

  • Height of wharves above mean low water (MLW).

  • Current use of wharves.

CRANES

  • Number and location of cranes.

  • Characteristics for each crane:

      - Lift capability.

      - Type of power.

      - Dimensions (maximum/minimum radii, outreach beyond wharf face, and above/below wharf hoist).

      - Speed (lifting, luffing, and slewing [revolutions]).

      - Height and width of port clearance.

      - Track length and gauge.

      - Make, model, and manufacturer.

      - Age and condition.

OTHER MHE

  • Number, location, and type of other MHE.

  • Characteristics for other MHE:

      - Type of power.

      - Lift capability.

      - Dimensions.

      - Track length and gauge, if any.

      - Make, model, and condition.

      - Age and condition

STEVEDORES

  • Number and size, efficiency, and working hours of gangs.

  • Availability and condition of stevedore gear.

  • Arrangements for gangs.

  • Availability of other local, national, or third country labor.

CRAFT

  • Number, type, and location of small craft (tug, pusher, ferry, fishing, pipe laying, barges) located in or near the port.

  • Characteristics for each craft:

      - Size and capacity.

      - Number of crew.

      - Berthing spaces.

      - Number and types of engines.

      - Number and types of generators.

      - Number of kilowatts for each generator.

      - Types of air compressors.

      - Number of air compressors.

      - Types of engine control (such as mechanized, hydro, and air).

      - Location of engine control (wheelhouse, engine room).

      - Normal working hours/day of crew.

      - Telegraph engine signal, if any.

      - Engine manufacturers (Fairbanks, Morse, Detroit, Cooper-Bessemer); types of hull (such as modified V, and round).

      - Construction materials (wood, steel, cement, fiberglass).

      - Number and types of rudder (steering, flanking).

      - Number of propellers (single, twin, or triple).

      - Type of radio (AM, FM, and frequency range).

      - Layout of the rail and road network in the port.

STORAGE FACILITIES

  • Number and location of storage facilities.

  • Characteristics of each:

      - Product stored.

      - Type of storage (open, covered, or refrigerated).

      - Capacity and/or dimensions.

      - Floor, wall, and roof material.

      - State of repair.

      - Special facilities.

      - Security facilities.

PORT EQUIPMENT REPAIR FACILITIES

  • Location, size, and capabilities of repair facilities.

  • Type of equipment.

  • Number and ability of repairmen.

  • Availability and system of procuring repair parts.

SHIP REPAIR FACILITIES

  • Number and type of dry dock and repair facilities.

  • Quality of work and level of repairs that can be made.

  • Location, size, and use of other buildings in the port.

  • Method for obtaining potable and boiler water in the port. (NOTE: See town EEI for additional items.)

  • Method for obtaining fuel, lube, and diesel oil in the port. (NOTE: See town EEI for additional items.)

  • Medical personnel in port. (NOTE: See town EEI for additional items.)

  • E1ectrical generating facilities in port or provisions for obtaining electricity from an external source. (NOTE: See town EEI for additional items.)

  • Ship-handling services available in the port.

SECURITY

  • Size and availability of the port security force.

  • Physical security facilities currently in use at the port (security fences, storage areas, electronic surveillance, and alarms).

  • Fire-fighting equipment available in the port.

BEACH EEI CHECKLIST

GENERAL

  • Map sheet number (series, sheet, edition, and date).

  • Nautical chart number.

  • Grid coordinates and longitude and latitude of the center beach (CB), left flank (LF), and right flank (RF).

  • Shape, length, and usable length of the beach.

  • Firmness of the beach.

  • Beach width and backshore width at LF, RF, and points every 200 yards in between.

  • Beach composition by percent at the near-shore, foreshore, and backshore.

  • Any dangerous or endangered marine or land animals in the area.

ANCHORAGES

  • Direction and true bearing from CB of all anchorages.

  • Maximum and minimum depth for each anchorage.

  • Current speed and direction at each anchorage.

  • Radius of each anchorage.

  • Bottom materials and holding characteristics of each anchorage.

  • Exposure condition of each anchorage.

  • Protected anchorage nearby for landing craft.

APPROACHES

  • Beach gradient at LF, RF, and points every 200 yards in between.

  • Offshore and/or nearshore obstacles, what are they, and their distance and true bearing from the CB.

  • Sandbars or reefs along the beach.

  • Composition by percent of the immediate offshore bottom.

  • Description of navigational aids.

  • Any marine plants that could inhibit movement of landing craft.

HYDROGRAPHY

  • Type and mean range of the tide.

  • Direction and speed of the current.

  • Minimum and maximum water temperature.

  • Per calendar quarter, percentage of time the surf is within 0 to 4 feet, 4 to 6 feet, 6 to 9 feet, and over 9 feet.

  • Per calendar quarter, percentage of time that swells are within 0 to 4 feet, 4 to 6 feet, 6 to 9 feet, and over 9 feet.

WEATHER

  • Types of weather conditions encountered in the area.

  • Times when these conditions occur.

  • The prevailing wind direction per calendar quarter.

  • Per calendar quarter, percentage of time the wind speed is within 1 to 6 knots, 7 to 16 knots, and over 17 knots.

  • Maximum, minimum, and average precipitation per month to the nearest tenth of an inch.

  • Maximum minimum, and average surface air temperature per month.

  • Frequency, duration, and density of fog.

  • Effects of weather on terrain, sea vessel travel, and logistical operations (such as off-loading materials on vehicles and/or rails).

  • Seasonal climatic conditions that would inhibit LOTS operations for prolonged periods (24 hours or more).

VEHICLE TRAFFICABILITY

  • Vehicle trafficability in dry and wet conditions for wheeled and tracked vehicles.

  • Type of matting recommended (such as MOMAT or steel planking).

  • Exit points for vehicles along the beach.

  • Roads along or leading from the beach.

  • Materials that make up roads.

  • Condition of the roads.

  • Distance from the road to MLW and high water line.

CONSTRUCTION

  • Buildings on the beach.

  • Distance and true bearing of buildings from CB.

  • Size, construction, and use of buildings.

  • Fortifications or obstacles on the beach.

  • Distance and true bearing of obstacles from the CB.

  • Size and construction of fortifications or obstacles.

  • Piers along the beach.

  • Distance and true bearing of piers from the CB.

  • Pier type, length, width, construction material present condition and water depth alongside.

NEAR HINTERLAND (within 1,000 meters of shoreline)

  • Dunes along the beach; description of dune length, width, height, and distance from high water shoreline.

  • Characteristics of terrain and vegetation.

  • Where tree line begins.

  • Availability and description of open storage areas.

  • Power and/or pipelines in the area.

  • Location size, construction, and purpose of any buildings or other man-made objects.

  • Estuaries and inland waterways; distance from high water shoreline (see lines of communication EEI).

  • Road and/or rail networks (see lines of communication EEI).

  • Town (see town EEI).

FAR HINTERLAND (1 to 30 kilometers from beach)

  • Characteristics of terrain and/or vegetation.

  • Power and/or pipelines in the area.

  • Road, rail and water networks (see lines of communication EEI).

  • Town (see town EEI).

  • Nearest airport (airport EEIs are developed when required).

  • Military installations in the area and description of each.

LINES OF COMMUNICATION EEI

PRIMARY AND SECONDARY ROADS

  • Type of primary roads (concrete, asphalt).

  • Primary and secondary roads that allow north-south and lateral movement.

  • Capacity of intraterminal road networks.

  • Present condition of these roads.

  • Bridges constructed along these roads.

  • Construction materials of bridges along these routes.

  • Width and weight allowance of these bridges.

  • Overpasses and tunnels located along these routes.

  • Width and height allowance of the overpasses and tunnels.

  • Major cities that roads enter and exit.

RAIL

  • Type of rail line and rail network.

  • Location and weight allowance of rail bridges.

  • Location and restriction of overpasses and tunnels that pass over rail lines.

  • Gauges.

  • Equipment available (for example, locomotives [steam or diesel], flatcars, and boxcars).

  • Ownership of rail network (private or government).

  • Address and telephone number of rail network authorities.

INLAND WATERWAY

  • Width of the waterway.

  • Average depth, speed of the water, and shallow point.

  • With given cargo weight, how close to the shore will water depth allow types of vehicles.

  • Capacity to conduct clearance operations via inland waterway.

  • Points at which tugs will be needed to support travel of vessel.

  • Points along the coast that are most suitable for different types of sea and/or land operations.

  • Types of channel markers.

  • Points that are most suitable for mining of waterway.

  • Effect, such as timely delay, that mining would have on ship passage.

  • Locations at which waterways narrow into choke point.

  • Other than choke points, locations where vessels are vulnerable to shore fire.

  • Security that is available for vessels (under-way, at anchor, or tied up).

  • Type of special units, such as water sappers, that can threaten sea vessels.

  • Local shore security available to protect vessels once they are docked.

  • Type and number of local watercraft available to move cargo.

  • Maintenance capability that exists for these vessels.

  • Docks along the waterway.

  • Local regulations that govern inland water-way operations.

  • Address and/or telephone number of the waterway authorities, if any.

THREAT EEI CHECKLIST

Enemy threat and capability in the area of other operation (air, ground, NBC).

Description of local overt/covert organization from which hostile action can be expected.

Availability of local assets for rear area security operations.

In addition to port/LOTS operations, primary targets in the area (military bases, key industrial activities, political/cultural center, and earth station).

TOWN EEI CHECKLIST

GENERAL

  • Name of towns.

  • Grid coordinates and longitude and latitude of the towns.

  • Size and significance of the towns.

  • Primary means of livelihood for the towns.

  • Form of government that exists.

  • Description of the local police and/or militia.

  • Description of the local equipment.

  • Local laws or customs that will impact on operations in this area.

  • Availability of billeting.

POPULATION

  • Size of the population.

  • Racial and religious breakdown of the population.

  • Languages spoken.

  • Political or activist parties that exist in the town.

  • Population attitude (friendly or hostile).

LABOR

  • Names, addresses, and telephone numbers of contracting agents available with services that may be needed during operations (for example husbanding agents, potable water/boiler water, ship repair, coastal vessels, lighterage, machinist, and skilled/ unskilled labor).

WATER

  • Availability of potable water and boiler water.

  • Size, location, and condition of water purification or desalinization plants.

  • Other sources of water, if any.

  • Quantity, quality, method, and rates of delivery.

  • Special size connections required, if any.

  • Water barges available, if any.

  • Water requiring special treatment before use, if any.

MEDICAL FACILITIES

  • Location, size, capabilities, and standards of local hospitals and other medical facilities.

  • Availability of doctors (specialized), nurses, and medical supplies.

  • Any local diseases which require special attention or preventive action.

  • Overall health and sanitary standards of the towns and surrounding area.

ELECTRICITY

  • Location, size (kilowatts), and condition of the power station servicing the area.

  • How power station is fueled.

  • Location and size of transformer stations.

  • Voltage and cycles of the electricity.

  • Other sources of electricity, such as large generators, in the area of significance.

POL

  • Location and size of wholesale fuel distributors in the area (including type of fuel).

  • Location and size of POL storage areas and/or tanks in the area (including type of fuel).

COMMUNICATIONS

  • Location and size (kilowatts) of local radio and television stations.

  • Address of telephone and/or telex offices.

  • Description of domestic telephone service in the area (type, condition, number of lines, switching equipment, and use of landlines or microwave).



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