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APPENDIX A

EXTRACT OF STANAG 2041 (EDITION 4), OPERATION
ORDERS, TABLES AND GRAPHS FOR ROAD MOVEMENT

Annexes:
 
 
A.
B.
C.
Example of an Operation Order for Road Movement
Specimen Road Movement Table
Example of a Road Movement Graph

 

AIM

1. The aim of this agreement is to standardize operation orders, tables and graphs for road movement.

AGREEMENT

2. Participating nations agree to use the standard layouts for operation orders for road movement, road movement tables and graphs, as given in Annexes A to C. The instructions given in subsequent paragraphs are in amplification of these layouts.

DEFINITIONS

3. These definitions are taken from the NATO Glossary of Military Terms in English and French (AAP-6) and are repeated for convenience:
  a.

Warning Order . A preliminary notice of an order or action which is to follow. It is designed to give subordinates time to make necessary plans and preparations.

 
  b.

Operation Order . A directive, usually formal, issued by a commander to subordinate commanders for the purpose of effecting the coordinated execution of an operation.

 
  c.

Standing Operation Procedure Set of instructions which lend themselves to a definite or standardized procedure without loss of effectiveness. The procedure is applicable unless prescribed otherwise in a particular case. Thus, the flexibility necessary in special situations is retained.

 
  d.

Standing Order . A promulgated order which remains in force until amended or cancelled.

ORDERS

4. Warning orders and operation orders are the primary means of effecting a road movement. Much detail can be eliminated from these orders by the use of standing operating procedures and standing orders for road movement.
 
  a. Warning Orders . These orders are issued when required and should include sufficient Data to alert troops for movement and to allow subordinate commanders to make preliminary plans. The amount of detail included will depend on the military and traffic situation, the state of training of the troops and the extent to which standing orders/standing operating procedures have been developed.
 
  b. Operation Orders for Road Movement . Whenever possible, detailed orders should be issued in the form of operation orders for road movement, in conformity with STANAG 2014 and Annex A. Annexes to the orders may include road movement tables and/or road movement graphs (see Annexes B and C). Overlays may be used to reduce the amount of written detail.
 
  c. Standing Operating Procedures and Standing Orders . These instructions should contain information on techniques, drills and procedures which are likely to be constant under any conditions. Properly developed, they will help to avoid unnecessary repetition of detail in orders. Some headings that may be used in preparing standing operating procedures and standing orders are:
 
    (1) Composition and duties of advance party.
 
    (2) Vehicle loads, including personnel.
 
    (3) Grouping of vehicles and group commanders.
 
    (4) Organization of columns.
 
    (5) Sign-posting and traffic control.
 
    (6) Responsibility for manning start point and release point.
 
    (7) Discipline; halts; lighting.
 
    (8) Action in the event of enemy attack.
 
    (9) Drill for establishing headquarters on arrival.
 
    (10) Responsibility for issue of operation orders for movements for headquarters.
 
    (11) Safety measures.

ROAD MOVEMENT TABLES (See Annex B)

5. a. Road movement tables will consist of two parts; one giving "data" paragraphs reflecting general information common to two or more columns (or elements of column), the other listing the columns (or elements of column), together with all other necessary information arranged in tabular form.
 
  b. These afford a convenient means of transmitting to subordinates their schedules and other essential d inclusion of such detail in the body of the operation order would tend to complicate it or make it unduly long.
 
  c. They will frequently require a wider distribution than a normal operation order so that copies can be issued to movement control personnel, traffic posts, etc.
 
  d. Their security classification will be based on content and need not necessarily be the same as that of the operation order for road movement
 

ROAD MOVEMENT GRAPHS (See Annex C)

6. General
 
  a. Road movement graphs are used by staffs in planning, supervising and regulating complicated movements and for providing a convenient means of recording actual moves of units over a period.
 
  b. The unit of measure to be used, i.e. kilometres or miles, will depend on the requirements of the authorities concerned. However, the resulting orders and instructions should not contain a mixture of units except where both are shown throughout, e.g. 5 miles (8 kilometres).
7. Pass Time . (Road ) Pass time is calculated by the following formula:
  Pass time (in mins) = N x 60 + TG
      D x S
Where N = Number of vehicles
  D = Traffic Density (No of vehicles per km/mile)
  S = Average speed
  TG = Time Gap
   
  The time gap is expressed in minutes and is the sum of the intervals between columns and elements of the columns.
   

8. Time Gaps between Columns . Between columns having different movement numbers, no standard time gaps are prescribed; these time gaps are allotted by the staff ordering the movement.

IMPLEMENTATION OF THE AGREEMENT

9. This STANAG will be considered to have been implemented when the necessary orders/instructions putting the procedures detailed in this agreement into effect have been issued to the forces concerned.

ANNEX A TO STANAG 2041

EXAMPLE OF AN OPERATION ORDER FOR ROAD MOVEMENT
(See STANAG 2014)

(Sub-headings of paragraphs 3, 4 and 5 are intended as a guide only and may be varied according to national requirements)

(SECURITY CLASSIFICATION)

(Change from Oral Orders, if any)

    Copy No _____ of _____ copies
Issuing Headquarters
Place of Issue (may be in code)
Date-Time Group of Signature
Message Reference No.

 

MOVEMENT ORDER No.

References: A. Maps, tables and relevant documents (see STANAG 2029)
  B.  

Time Zone used throughout the Order:

Task Organization

1. SITUATION
  a. Enemy Forces
  b. Friendly Forces
  c. Attachments and Detachments
  d. Commander's Evaluation (optional)
2. MISSION
3. EXECUTION
  a. Concept of movement
  b. Task to subordinate units
  c.  
  d.  
  e. Detailed timings
  f. Co-ordinating Instructions
  (1) Order of March
  (2) Routes
  (3) Density
  (4) Speed
  (5) Method of Movement
  (6) Defence on Move
  (7) Start, Release or Other Critical Points
  (8) Convoy Control
  (9) Harbour Areas
  (10) Instructions for Halts
  (11) Lighting
  (12) Air Support
     
4. SERVICE SUPPORT
     
  a. Traffic Control
  b. Recovery
  c. Medical
  d. Petrol, Oil and Lubricants
  e. Water
       
5. COMMAND AND SIGNAL
       
  a. Commander(s)
  b. Communications
  c. Position of Key Vehicles

 

Acknowledgment Instructions: Last name of commander:
Authentication: Rank:
Annexes:
Distribution:

(SECURITY CLASSIFICATION)

 

 

NOTES:

1. Only the minimum number of headings above should be used. Any information which is common to two or more movement numbers should be included under the "date" paragraphs.
   
2. As the table may be issued to personnel concerned with control of traffic, the security aspect must be remembered. It may not be desirable to include dates or location.
   
3. If the table is issued by itself, and not as an annex to a more detailed order, the table must be signed or authenticated in the normal way.
   
4. "Critical Point" is defined as "a selected point along a route used for reference in giving instructions. It includes start points, release points and other points along a route where interference with movement may occur or where timings are critical".
   
5. This will be the number which is used to identify a column (or element of column) during the whole of the movement (see STANAG 2154, paragraphs 10 and 11).
   
6. In the case of an annex having the same distribution as an operation order it will not be necessary to include the headings and ending as shown on this page.
   
7. Definitions of these terms will be found in AAP-6.

 

 

 

 



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