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APPENDIX E

BATTLE DRILLS AND CREW DRILLS

SBCT infantry battle and crew drills describe how platoons and squads apply immediate action and fire and maneuver to commonly encountered situations and equipment malfunctions. They require leaders to make decisions rapidly and to issue brief oral orders quickly. A platoon's ability to accomplish its mission often depends on soldiers, leaders, squads, and sections executing key actions quickly. All soldiers and their leaders must know their immediate reaction to enemy contact and equipment malfunction as well as follow-up actions.

Drills are limited to situations requiring instantaneous response; therefore, soldiers must execute drills instinctively, which results from continual practice. Drills provide platoons with standard procedures essential for building strength and aggressiveness. They identify key actions that leaders and soldiers must perform quickly. They provide for a smooth transition from one activity to another; for example, from movement to offensive action to defensive action. They provide standardized actions that link soldier and collective tasks at platoon level and below. (Soldiers perform individual tasks to common task test [CTT] or self-development test [SDT] standard.) Drills must be understood by each individual and leader, and must be continually practiced by the platoon.

NOTE: The format for drills discussed in this chapter includes the title, the SITUATION that would cue the unit or the leader into initiating the drill, the REQUIRED ACTIONS in sequence, and supporting illustrations. Where applicable, drills are cross-referenced with material in FMs, other drills, or both. Battle drills are in Section I and crew drills are in Section II (crew drills to be published). (See ARTEP 7-8-Drill for the task, conditions, and standards for dismounted drill training.)

Section I. BATTLE DRILLS

Field Manual 25-101 defines a battle drill as "a collective action rapidly executed without applying a deliberate decision-making process." Battle drills --

  • Require minimal orders from leaders and are standard throughout the Army.
  • Are sequential actions vital to success in combat or critical to preserving life.
  • Apply to platoon or smaller units.
  • Are trained responses to enemy actions or leaders' orders.
  • Represent mental steps followed for offensive and defensive actions in training and combat.
NOTE: The following drills are numbered to correspond to the numbering system used in ARTEP 7-8-Drill.

BATTLE DRILL 2. REACT TO CONTACT

SITUATION: A squad or platoon receives fires from enemy individual or crew-served weapons.

REQUIRED ACTIONS: (Figure E-1).

a. Soldiers immediately take up the nearest covered positions and return fire in the direction of contact.

b. Team or squad leaders locate and engage known or suspected enemy positions with well-aimed fire, and they pass information to the squad or platoon leader.

c. Fire team leaders control fire using standard fire commands (initial and supplemental) containing the following elements:

  • Alert.
  • Direction.
  • Description of target.
  • Range.
  • Method of fire (manipulation and rate of fire).
  • Command to commence firing.

d. Soldiers maintain contact with the soldiers on their left and right.

e. Soldiers maintain contact with their team leaders and report the location of enemy positions.

f. Leaders check the status of their personnel.

g. The team or squad leaders maintain contact with the squad or platoon leader.

h. The squad or platoon leader--

(1) Moves up to the fire team or squad in contact and links up with its leader. (The platoon leader brings his RATELO, platoon FO, the squad leader of the nearest squad, and one machine gun team. The squad leader of the trail squad moves to the front of his lead fire team. The platoon sergeant also moves forward with the second machine gun team and links up with the platoon leader, ready to assume control of the base-of-fire element.)

(2) Determines whether or not his squad or platoon must move out of an engagement area.

(3) Determines whether or not he can gain and maintain suppressive fires with his element already in contact (based on the volume and accuracy of enemy fires against the element in contact).

(4) Makes an assessment of the situation. He identifies--

  • The location of the enemy position and obstacles.
  • The size of the enemy force engaging the unit in contact. (The number of enemy automatic weapons, the presence of any vehicles, and the employment of indirect fires are indicators of the enemy strength.)
  • Vulnerable flanks.
  • Covered and concealed flanking routes to the enemy position.

(5) Determines the next course of action (for example fire and movement, assault, breach, knock out bunker, enter and clear a building or trench).

(6) Reports the situation to the platoon leader or company commander and begins to maneuver his unit.

(7) Calls for and adjusts indirect fire (mortars or artillery). (Squad leaders relay requests through the platoon leader.)

i. Team leaders lead their teams by example (for example, "Follow me, do as I do")

j. Leaders relay all commands and signals from the platoon chain of command.

Figure E-1. React to contact (dismounted).

Figure E-1. React to contact (dismounted).

Battle Drill 2A. REACT TO CONTACT (SECTION OR PLATOON) (MOUNTED)

SITUATION: While mounted, the platoon receives fires from enemy individual or crew-served weapons (including light antiarmor weapons).

REQUIRED ACTIONS: (Figure E-2).

Figure E-2. React to contact (mounted).

Figure E-2. React to contact (mounted).

a. Vehicles of the section in physical contact with the enemy immediately return fire in the direction of contact while moving out of the beaten zone. The section leader of the section in contact (if not the platoon leader) reports contact to the platoon leader.

b. All vehicles move to the nearest covered and concealed positions.

c. Upon reaching the covered and concealed position, the section in physical contact continues to engage the enemy with well-aimed fire. The squads dismount to provide local security and or add suppressive fires against the enemy position.

d. Vehicles of the section not in physical contact orient their weapons in the direction of the enemy.

e. The platoon leader or platoon sergeant reports contact to the company commander.

NOTE: Once the platoon has executed the React to Contact drill, the platoon leader makes a quick assessment of the situation (for example, enemy size and or location). He decides on a course of action. The platoon leader may elect to bypass, if permitted to do so by the company commander. The platoon leader reports the situation to the company commander.

f. Vehicle commanders within a section maintain visual contact with each other (wingman concept).

g. Vehicle commanders maintain communications with the platoon leader.

h. Vehicle commanders relay all commands to mounted infantry squads.

BATTLE DRILL 3. BREAK CONTACT

SITUATION: The squad or platoon is under enemy fire and must break contact.

REQUIRED ACTIONS: (Figure E-3).

a. The squad or platoon leader directs one fire team or squad in contact to support the disengagement of the remainder of the unit.

b. The squad or platoon leader orders a distance and direction, or a terrain feature, or last objective rally point for the movement of the first fire team or squad.

c. The base of fire (fire team or squad) continues to suppress the enemy.

d. The moving element uses fragmentation, concussion, and smoke grenades to mask its movement.

e. The moving element takes up the designated position and engages the enemy position.

f. The unit leader directs the base-of-fire element to move to its next location. (Based on the terrain and the volume and accuracy of the enemy's fire, the moving fire team or squad may need to use fire and movement techniques.

g. The squad or platoon continues to bound away from the enemy until (the squad or platoon must continue to suppress the enemy as it breaks contact)--

  • It breaks contact.
  • It passes through a higher level support-by-fire position.
  • Its fire teams or squads are in the assigned position to conduct the next mission.

h. The leader should consider changing his unit's direction of movement once contact is broken. This will reduce the ability of the enemy to place effective indirect fires on the unit.

i. If the unit becomes disrupted, soldiers stay together and move to the last designated rally point.

j. Squad or platoon leaders account for soldiers, report, reorganize as necessary, and continue the mission.

Figure E-3. Break contact dismounted.

Figure E-3. Break contact dismounted.

Battle Drill 3A. BREAK CONTACT (SECTION OR PLATOON) (MOUNTED)

SITUATION: The platoon is mounted (except for security elements). It is under enemy fire and must break contact.

REQUIRED ACTIONS: (Figure E-4).

Figure E-4. Break contact (mounted).

Figure E-4. Break contact (mounted).

a. The platoon leader gives the order to break contact.

b. The platoon leader directs one section to be the base-of-fire element to support the disengagement of the other section.

c. The platoon leader orders a distance and direction, a terrain feature, or last objective rally point for the moving section.

d. The base-of-fire section continues to engage the enemy. It attempts to gain suppressive fire long enough to support the bound of the moving element. (The platoon uses all available direct and indirect fires, including smoke, to assist in disengaging.) The section leader controls fires using standard fire commands containing the alert, direction, description of target, range, method of fire, and command to commence firing.

e. The moving section's security element remounts.

f. The moving section continues to fire while moving to an overwatch position and continues to provide suppressive fires.

g. The platoon leader directs the supporting section to move to its next location.

h. The platoon continues to bound away from the enemy (suppressing the enemy as it breaks contact) until--

  • It breaks all contact.
  • It passes through a higher level base-of-fire position.
  • Its sections are in the assigned position to conduct the next mission.

i. In the absence of a leader's instructions, the platoon moves to the last designated rally point.

j. Section and squad leaders account for soldiers, report, reorganize as necessary, and continue the mission.

k. The platoon leader reports the situation to the company commander.

BATTLE DRILL 4. REACT TO AMBUSH

SITUATION: If the squad or platoon enters a kill zone and the enemy initiates an ambush with casualty-producing device and a high volume of fire, the unit takes the following actions.

REQUIRED ACTIONS: (Figure E-5.)

a. In a near ambush (within hand-grenade range), soldiers receiving fire immediately return fire, take up covered positions, and throw fragmentation, concussion, and smoke grenades.

(1) Immediately after the grenades detonate, soldiers in the kill zone assault through the ambush using fire and movement.

(2) Soldiers not in the kill zone immediately--

  • Identify enemy positions.
  • Initiate immediate suppressive fires against the enemy.
  • Take up covered positions.
  • Shift fires as the soldiers in the kill zone assault through the ambush.

b. In a far ambush (beyond hand-grenade range), soldiers receiving fire immediately return fire, take up covered positions, and suppress the enemy by--

  • Destroying or suppressing enemy crew-served weapons first.
  • Obscuring the enemy position with smoke (M203).
  • Sustaining suppressive fires.

(1) Soldiers (teams or squads) not receiving fires move by a covered and concealed route to a vulnerable flank of the enemy position and assault using fire and movement techniques.

(2) Soldiers in the kill zone continue suppressive fires and shift fires as the assaulting team or squad fights through the enemy position.

c. The platoon FO calls for and adjusts indirect fires as directed by the platoon leader. On order, he lifts fires or shifts them to isolate the enemy position or to attack them with indirect fires as they retreat.

d. The squad or platoon leader reports, reorganizes as necessary, and continues the mission.

Figure E-5. React to ambush.

Figure E-5. React to ambush.

BATTLE DRILL 5. KNOCK OUT BUNKERS

SITUATION: The platoon identifies enemy in bunkers while moving as a part of a larger force.

REQUIRED ACTIONS: (Figure E-6, and Figure E-7.

a. The platoon initiates contact:

(1) The squad in contact establishes a base of fire.

(2) The platoon leader, his RATELO, platoon FO, and one machine gun team move forward to link up with the squad leader of the squad in contact.

(3) The platoon sergeant moves forward with the second machine gun team and assumes control of the base-of-fire element.

(4) The base-of-fire element--

(a) Destroys or suppresses enemy crew-served weapons first.

(b) Obscures the enemy position with smoke (M203).

(c) Sustains suppressive fires at the lowest possible level.

(5) The platoon FO calls for and adjusts indirect fires as directed by the platoon sergeant.

b. The platoon leader determines that he can maneuver by identifying--

  • Enemy bunkers, other supporting positions, and any obstacles.
  • Size of the enemy force engaging the platoon. (The number of enemy automatic weapons, the presence of any vehicles, and the employment of indirect fires are indicators of enemy strength.)
  • A vulnerable flank of at least one bunker.
  • A covered and concealed flanking route to the flank of the bunker.

c. The platoon leader determines which bunker is to be assaulted first and directs one squad (not in contact) to knock it out.

d. If necessary, the platoon sergeant repositions a squad, fire team, or machine gun team to isolate the bunker as well as to continue suppressive fires.

e. The assaulting squad, with the platoon leader and his RATELO, move along the covered and concealed route and take action to knock out the bunker.

(1) The squad leader moves with the assaulting fire team along the covered and concealed route to the flank of the bunker.

(a) The assaulting fire team approaches the bunker from its blind side and does not mask the fires of the base-of-fire element.

(b) Soldiers constantly watch for other bunkers or enemy positions in support of it.

(2) Upon reaching the last covered and concealed position--

(a) The fire team leader and the automatic rifleman remain in place and add their fires to suppressing the bunker (includes the use of AT4s).

(b) The squad leader positions himself where he can best control his teams. On the squad leader's signal, the base-of-fire element lifts fires or shifts fires to the opposite side of the bunker from the assaulting fire team's approach.

(c) The grenadier and rifleman continue forward to the blind side of the bunker. One soldier takes up a covered position near the exit, while one soldier cooks off (two seconds maximum) a grenade, shouts FRAG OUT, and throws it through an aperture.

(d) After the grenade detonates, the soldier covering the exit enters the bunker, firing short bursts, to destroy the enemy. The soldier who throws the grenade should not be the first one to clear the bunker.

(3) The squad leader inspects the bunker to ensure that it has been destroyed. He reports, reorganizes as needed, and continues the mission. The platoon follows the success of the attack against the bunker and continues the attack of other bunkers.

f. The platoon leader repositions base-of-fire squads as necessary to continue to isolate and suppress the remaining bunkers and maintain suppressive fires.

g. The platoon leader either redesignates one of the base-of-fire squads to move up and knock out the next bunker or directs the assaulting squad to continue and knock out the next bunker.

NOTE: The platoon leader must consider the condition of his assaulting squad(s) (ammunition and exhaustion) and rotate squads as necessary.

(1) On the platoon leader's signal, the base-of-fire element lifts fires or shifts fires to the opposite side of the bunker from which the squad is assaulting.

(2) At the same time, the platoon FO shifts indirect fires to isolate enemy positions.

h. The assaulting squad takes action to knock out the next bunker (see paragraph e, above).

i. The platoon leader reports, reorganizes as necessary, and continues the mission. The company follows up the success of the platoon attack and continues to assault enemy positions.

Figure E-6. Knock out a bunker (squad).

Figure E-6. Knock out a bunker (squad).

Figure E-7. Knock out bunkers (platoon).

Figure E-7. Knock out bunkers (platoon).

BATTLE DRILL 6. ENTER BUILDING/CLEAR ROOM

SITUATION: Operating as part of a larger force, the squad is moving and identifies an enemy force in a building.

REQUIRED ACTIONS: (Figure E-8, and Figure E-9).

NOTE: The discussion that follows assumes that only the platoon's organic weapons support the infantry squad. The preferred method of entering a building is to use a tank main gun round, direct fire artillery round, or TOW, Javelin, or Hellfire missile to clear the first room. Additionally, some UO situations may require precise application of firepower. This is true of a UO environment where the enemy is mixed with noncombatants. The presence of civilians can restrict the use of fires and reduce the combat power available to a platoon leader. His platoon may have to operate with "no fire" areas. ROE can prohibit the use of certain weapons until a specific hostile action takes place. The use of hand grenades and suppressive fire to enter rooms may be prohibited to preclude noncombatant casualties and collateral damage. All leaders must be aware of the ROE. They must include the precise use of weapons in their planning for UO missions. This includes how the platoon will employ its organic weapons including snipers and other weapon systems it may have in support (for example AC 130 or AH 64 aircraft). Leaders must coordinate the use of marking systems to prevent casualties due to friendly fire. FM 3-06.11 (FM 90-10-1) provides additional techniques for platoons and squads in UO.

a. The fire team initiating contact establishes a base of fire and suppresses the enemy in and around the building.

b. The squad leader determines that he can maneuver by identifying--

  • The building and any obstacles.
  • The size of the enemy force engaging the squad.
  • An entry point. (Assaulting fire teams should enter the building at the highest level possible.)
  • A covered and concealed route to the entry point.

c. The fire team in contact--

  • Destroys or suppresses enemy crew-served weapons first.
  • Obscures the enemy position with smoke (M203).
  • Sustains suppressive fires.

d. The squad leader directs the fire team in contact to support the entry of the other fire team into the building.

e. If necessary, the supporting fire team repositions to isolate the building as well as continue suppressive fires. (Normally, the platoon has added its supporting fires against the enemy.)

f. The squad leader designates the entry point of the building. The platoon and squad shift direct fires and continue to suppress the enemy in adjacent positions and to isolate the building. The platoon FO lifts indirect fires or shifts them beyond the building.

g. The squad leader and the assaulting fire team approach the building and position themselves at either side of the entrance. (Soldiers should avoid entering buildings through doors and windows because enemy weapons from inside the building normally will cover these.)

h. Allowing cook-off time (two seconds maximum) and shouting FRAG OUT, the lead soldier of the assaulting fire team prepares and throws a grenade into the building.

DANGER

IF WALLS AND FLOORS ARE THIN, THEY DO NOT PROVIDE PROTECTION FROM HAND GRENADE FRAGMENTS.

i. After the explosion, the next soldier enters the building and positions himself to the right (left) of the entrance, up against the wall, engages all identified or likely enemy positions with rapid, short bursts of automatic fire, and scans the room. The rest of the team provides immediate security outside the building.

(1) The size and shape of the room may cause the soldier entering the room to move to the left or right. The first soldier in the room decides where the next man should position himself and gives the command NEXT MAN IN, LEFT (or RIGHT). The next man shouts COMING IN, LEFT (RIGHT), enters the building, positions himself to the left of the entrance, up against the wall, and scans the room. Once in position, he shouts NEXT MAN IN (RIGHT or LEFT).

(2) Depending on the enemy's situation, the size of the entry and the training of the squad, two soldiers can enter the room simultaneously after the grenade detonates. The soldier from the right side of the entry enters, fires from left to right, and moves to right with his back to the wall. At the same time, the soldier on the left enters from the left, fires from right to left, and moves to the left with his back to the wall. One soldier goes high, the other low, to prevent firing at one another. This method puts more firepower in the room quickly but is more difficult and requires more practice. When both soldiers are in position, the senior soldier gives the command NEXT MAN IN (RIGHT or LEFT).

j. The assaulting fire team leader shouts COMING IN (RIGHT or LEFT), enters the building initially moving left or right and against the wall, and positions himself where he can control the actions of his team. He does not block the entrance. He makes a quick assessment of the size and shape of the room and begins to clear the room. He determines if the remaining man in his team is required to assist in clearing the room.

(1) If the team leader decides to bring the last man in, he shouts NEXT MAN IN, LEFT (or RIGHT). The last man in the fire team shouts COMING IN LEFT (or RIGHT), enters the building, and begins to clear through the room.

(2) If the team leader decides not to bring the last man in, he shouts NEXT MAN, STAND FAST. The last man remains outside the building and provides security from there. The team leader then directs the soldier on the right of the entrance to begin clearing. The team leader reports to the squad leader and then assumes the duties of the soldier on the right of the entrance to provide support.

DANGER

WHILE CLEARING ROOMS, SOLDIERS MUST BE ALERT FOR TRIP WIRES AND BOOBY TRAPS. THEY SHOULD NOT EXPOSE THEMSELVES THROUGH OPEN WINDOWS OR DOORS.

k. Once the room is cleared, the team leader signals to the squad leader that the room is cleared.

l. The squad leader enters the building and marks the entry point in accordance with the unit SOP. The squad leader determines whether or not his squad can continue to clear rooms and still maintain suppressive fires outside the building. It normally takes a platoon to clear a building.

m. The squad leader and assault fire team move to the entrance of the next room to be cleared and position themselves on either side of the entrance. The squad enters and clears all subsequent rooms by repeating the actions discussed in paragraphs h through l, above.

n. The squad leader directs the team to continue and clear the next room. The squad leader rotates fire teams as necessary to keep the soldiers fresh, to equitably distribute the dangerous duties, and to continue the momentum of the attack.

o. The squad leader follows the fire team that is clearing to ensure that cleared rooms are properly marked in accordance with the unit SOP.

p. The squad leader assesses the situation to determine if he can continue clearing the building. He reports the situation to the platoon leader. The platoon follows the success of the entry into the building.

q. The squad consolidates its position in the building and then reorganizes as necessary. Leaders redistribute ammunition.

NOTE: Normally the squad or platoons will suppress enemy in buildings with large caliber weapons (ICVs, MGSs, or tanks if available).

Figure E-8. Enter a building (squad).

Figure E-8. Enter a building (squad).

Figure E-9. Clear a room (squad).

Figure E-9. Clear a room (squad).

BATTLE DRILL 7. ENTER/CLEAR A TRENCH

SITUATION: The platoon is attacking as part of a larger force and identifies enemy in a trench line. The platoon deploys and establishes a base of fire. The platoon leader determines that he has sufficient combat power to maneuver and assault the trench line.

REQUIRED ACTIONS: (Figure E-10, and Figure E-11).

a. The platoon leader directs one squad to enter the trench and secure a foothold.

b. The platoon leader designates the entry point of the trench line and the direction of movement once the platoon begins clearing.

c. The platoon sergeant positions soldiers and machine guns to suppress the trench and isolate the entry point.

d. The assaulting squad executes actions to enter the trench and establish a foothold. The squad leader directs one fire team to assault and one fire team to support by fire initially, then follow and support the assaulting fire team. He designates the entry point of the trench line.

(1) The squad leader and the assault fire team move to the last covered and concealed position short of the entry point.

(a) The squad leader marks the entry point.

(b) The base-of-fire element shifts direct fires away from the entry point and continues to suppress adjacent enemy positions or isolate the trench as required.

(c) The assault fire team leader and the automatic rifleman remain in a position short of the trench to add suppressive fires for the initial entry.

(d) The two remaining soldiers of the assault fire team (rifleman and grenadier) continue toward the entry point. They move in rushes or by crawling.

(e) The squad leader positions himself where he can best control his teams.

(2) The first two soldiers (rifleman and grenadier) of the assault fire team move to the edge of the trench; parallel to the trench and on their backs; on the squad leader's command, cook-off grenades (two seconds maximum), shout FRAG OUT, and throw the grenades into the trench.

(a) After ensuring that both grenades detonate, the soldiers roll into the trench, landing on their feet, and back-to-back. They fire their weapons down the trench in opposite directions. Immediately, both soldiers move in opposite directions down the trench, continuing to fire three-round bursts. Each soldier continues until he reaches the first corner or intersection. Both soldiers halt and take up positions to block any enemy movement toward the entry point.

(b) Upon detonation of the grenades, the assault fire team leader and the automatic rifleman immediately move to the entry point and enter the trench. The squad leader directs them to one of the secured corners or intersections to relieve the rifleman or grenadier who then rejoins his buddy team at the opposite end of the foothold.

(3) The squad leader remains at the entry point and marks it.

(4) The squad leader reports to the platoon leader that he has entered the trench and secured a foothold. The platoon follows the success of the seizure of the foothold with the remainder of the platoon as part of the platoon actions to clear a trench line.

(5) The squad reorganizes as necessary. Leaders redistribute ammunition.

e. The platoon leader directs one of the base-of-fire element squads to move into the trench and begin clearing it in the direction of movement from the foothold.

f. The base-of-fire element repositions as necessary to continue suppressive fires.

g. The platoon leader moves into the trench with the assaulting squad.

h. The assaulting squad passes the squad that has secured the foothold and executes actions to take the lead and clear the trench.

(1) The squad leader designates a lead fire team and a trail fire team.

(2) The lead fire team and the squad leader move to the forward-most secure corner or intersection. The squad leader tells the team securing that corner or intersection that his squad is ready to continue clearing the trench. The trail fire team follows, maintaining visual contact with the last soldier of the lead team.

NOTE: Throughout this technique, the team leader positions himself at the rear of the fire team to have direct control (physically, if necessary) of his soldiers. Other soldiers in the fire team rotate the lead. Soldiers rotate the lead to change magazines and prepare grenades. Rotating the lead provides constant suppressive fires down the trench and maintains the momentum of the attack as the squad clears the trench.

(3) The lead fire team passes the element securing the foothold.

(a) The lead soldier of the fire team moves abreast of the soldier securing the corner or intersection, taps him, and announces TAKING THE LEAD.

(b) The soldier securing the corner or intersection acknowledges that he is handing over the lead by shouting OKAY. He allows the fire team to pass him.

(4) The lead fire team starts clearing in the direction of movement. They arrive at a corner or intersection.

(a) Allowing for cook-off (two seconds maximum) and shouting FRAG OUT, the second soldier prepares and throws a grenade around the corner.

(b) Upon detonation of the grenade, the lead soldier moves around the corner firing three round bursts and advancing as he fires. The entire fire team follows him to the next corner or intersection.

(5) The squad leader--

  • Follows immediately behind the lead team.
  • Ensures that the trailing fire team moves up and is ready to pass the lead at his direction.
  • Rotates fire teams as necessary to keep his soldiers fresh and to maintain the momentum of the attack.
  • Requests indirect fires, if necessary, through the platoon leader.

DANGER

THE FIRE TEAMS MUST MAINTAIN SUFFICIENT INTERVAL TO PREVENT THEM FROM BEING ENGAGED BY THE SAME ENEMY FIRES.

(6) At each corner or intersection, the lead fire team performs the same actions described above (paragraph [5]).

(7) If the lead soldier finds that he is nearly out of ammunition before reaching a corner or intersection, he announces AMMO.

(a) Immediately, the lead soldier stops and moves against one side of the trench, ready to let the rest of the team pass. He continues to aim his weapon down the trench in the direction of movement.

(b) The next soldier ensures that he has a full magazine, moves up abreast of the lead soldier, taps him, and announces TAKING THE LEAD.

(c) The lead soldier acknowledges that he is handing over the lead by shouting OKAY, positions rotate, and the squad continues forward.

(8) The trailing fire team secures intersections and marks the route within the trench as the squad moves forward. The trailing fire team leader ensures that follow-on squads relieve his buddy teams to maintain security.

(9) The squad leader reports the progress of the clearing operation. (The base-of-fire element must be able to identify the location of the lead fire team in the trench at all times.)

i. The platoon leader rotates squads to keep soldiers fresh and to maintain the momentum of the assault.

j. The platoon sergeant calls forward ammunition resupply and organizes teams to move it forward into the trench.

k. The base-of-fire element ensures that all friendly forces move into the trench ONLY through the designated entry point. (All movement must be made in the trench to avoid casualties by friendly fires.)

l. The platoon leader reports to the company commander that the trench line is secured, or that he is no longer able to continue clearing.

Figure E-10. Enter a trench (squad).

Figure E-10. Enter a trench (squad).

Figure E-11. Clear a trench line (platoon).

Figure E-11. Clear a trench line (platoon).

BATTLE DRILL 8. CONDUCT INITIAL BREACH OF A MINED WIRE OBSTACLE (PLATOON)

SITUATION: The platoon is operating as part of a larger force. The lead squad identifies a wire obstacle, reinforced with mines that cannot be bypassed, and enemy positions on the far side of the obstacle.

REQUIRED ACTIONS: (Figure E-12, and Figure E-13

a. The platoon leader, his RATELO, platoon FO, and one machine gun team move forward to link up with the squad leader of the lead squad.

b. The platoon leader determines that he can maneuver by identifying--

  • The obstacle and enemy positions covering it by fire.
  • The size of the enemy force engaging the squad. (The number of enemy automatic weapons, the presence of any vehicles, and the employment of indirect fires are indicators of enemy strength.)
  • A breach point.
  • A covered and concealed route to the breach point.
  • A support-by-fire position large enough for a squad reinforced with machine guns.

c. The platoon leader directs one squad to support the movement of another squad(s) to the breach point. He indicates the support-by-fire position, the route to it, the enemy position to be suppressed, the breach point, and the route that the rest of the platoon will take to it. He also gives instructions for lifting and shifting fires.

d. Once the breach has been made, the platoon leader designates one squad as the breach squad and the remaining squad as the assault squad. (The assault squad may add its fires to the base-of-fire element. Normally, it follows the covered and concealed route of the breach squad and assaults through immediately after the breach is made.)

e. The designated squad moves to and establishes a base of fire.

f. The platoon sergeant moves forward to the base-of-fire element with the second machine gun team and assumes control of the element.

g. On the platoon leader's signal, the base-of-fire element--

  • Destroys or suppresses enemy crew-served weapons first.
  • Obscures the enemy position with smoke (M203).
  • Sustains suppressive fires at the lowest possible level.

h. The platoon leader designates the breach point and leads the breach and assault squads along the covered and concealed route to it.

i. The platoon FO calls for and adjusts indirect fires as directed by the platoon leader.

j. The breach squad executes actions to breach the obstacle.

(1) The squad leader directs one fire team to support the movement of the other fire team to the breach point.

(2) The squad leader identifies the breach point.

(3) The base-of-fire element continues to provide suppressive fires and isolates the breach point.

(4) The breaching fire team, with the squad leader, move to the breach point using the covered and concealed route.

(a) The squad leader and breaching fire team leader employ smoke grenades to obscure the breach point. The platoon base-of-fire element shifts direct fires away from the breach point and continues to suppress key enemy positions. The platoon FO lifts indirect fires or shifts them beyond the obstacle.

(b) The breaching fire team leader positions himself and the automatic rifleman on one flank of the breach point to provide close-in security.

(c) The grenadier and rifleman of the breaching fire team probe for mines and cut the wire obstacle, marking their path as they proceed. (Bangalore is preferred, if available.)

(d) Once the obstacle has been breached, the breaching fire team leader and the automatic rifleman move to the far side of the obstacle and take up covered and concealed positions with the rifleman and grenadier. The team leader signals to the squad leader when they are in position and ready to support.

(5) The squad leader signals the supporting fire team leader to move his fire team up and through the breach. He then moves through the obstacle and joins the breaching fire team, leaving the grenadier and rifleman of the supporting fire team on the near side of the breach to guide the rest of the platoon through.

(6) Using the same covered and concealed route as the breaching fire team, the supporting fire team moves through the breach and takes up covered and concealed positions on the far side.

(7) The squad leader reports to the platoon leader and consolidates as needed.

k. The platoon leader leads the assault squad through the breach in the obstacle and positions them beyond the breach to support the movement of the remainder of the platoon or assaults the enemy position covering the obstacle.

l. The platoon leader reports the situation to the company commander and directs his base-of-fire element to move up and through the obstacle. The platoon leader leaves guides to guide the company through the breach point.

m. The company follows up the success of the platoon as it conducts the breach and continues the assault against the enemy positions.

Figure E-12. Conduct initial breach of a mined wire obstacle (squad).

Figure E-12. Conduct initial breach of a mined wire obstacle (squad).

Figure E-13. Conduct initial breach of a mined wire obstacle (platoon).

Figure E-13. Conduct initial breach of a mined wire obstacle (platoon).

Section II. CREW DRILLS

A crew drill is a collective action that the crew of a weapon or piece of equipment must perform to successfully use the weapon or equipment in combat or to preserve life. This action is a trained response to a given stimulus, such as a leader's order or the status of the weapon or equipment. It requires minimal orders to accomplish and is standard throughout the Army.

Crew Dill 1. BAIL OUT (CREW/SQUAD)

SITUATION: The ICV, with a squad mounted, has received hostile fire requiring the crew and squad to evacuate the vehicle.

REQUIRED ACTIONS:

a. Bailout procedures for the ICV crew.

(1) Vehicle Commander:

(a) Alerts soldiers by the intercommunications system or by voice command if the intercom system does not work. Commands BAIL OUT.

(b) Turns RWS power off by pressing the RWS fire control unit ON/OFF power switch.

NOTE: As soldiers dismount they should use the ICV for cover from enemy direct fires.

(c) Disconnects the CVC helmet and secures weapon.

(d) Evacuates the vehicle through the troop compartment or VC's hatch.

(e) Accounts for driver.

(f) Secures vehicle.

(2) Driver:

(a) Stops the vehicle.

(b) Lowers the ramp.

(c) Shuts down the vehicle by turning the electrical master switch OFF or pulls the fuel cut-off handle to the OFF position.

(d) Disconnects the CVC helmet and unfastens his seat belt.

(e) Secures his weapon.

(f) Evacuates the vehicle through the driver's hatch, if possible. If the driver cannot evacuate through the driver's hatch, he exits through the troop compartment.

b. Bailout procedures for the troop compartment and squad members.

(1) Squad Leader or Fire Team Leader:

(a) Announces BAIL OUT.

(b) Pulls the quick disconnect to release the CVC helmet or headset.

(c) Disconnects his seat belt.

(d) Secures his weapon and squad radio.

(e) Evacuates the vehicle through the ramp or ramp access door.

(f) Accounts for soldiers and equipment.

(2) Squad/Fire Team Members:

(a) Disconnects seat belts.

(b) Pulls the quick disconnect to release CVC helmets as appropriate.

(c) Secures weapons (individual and crew).

(d) Evacuates the vehicle through the ramp door or the cargo hatch.

CREW DRILL 2. EVACUATE INJURED PERSONNEL FROM AN ICV

SITUATION: A crewmember or squad member has been injured.

REQUIRED ACTIONS:

a. Evacuate vehicle commander's hatch.

(1) Evacuate the VC through the vehicle commander's hatch.

(a) Squad leader commands EVACUATE THE VEHICLE COMMANDER.

(b) Driver--

  • Moves to the nearest covered position and halts the vehicle.
  • Lowers the wire cutter.

(c) Squad leader--

  • Turns RWS power off by pressing the RWS Fire control Unit ON/OFF power switch.
  • Conducts immediate first aid.
  • Places the VC in position for removal from the vehicle.
  • Adjusts the seat to the raised position, being careful not to cause further injury.
  • Unfastens the VC's seat belt and disconnects CVC helmet.
  • Designates fire team to evacuate the VC.

(d) Fire Team exits the vehicle through the ramp access door, the ramp, or ,if necessary, the cargo hatch.

  • Moves to the front of the vehicle to assist in removing the injured VC.
  • Two Fire Team members mount the vehicle from the front and move to VC hatch.

(e) Fire Team Members--

  • Open and secure the VC hatch.
  • Place a belt (or similar device) around the VC's chest and slowly pull the VC out. If the VC is wearing a CVC suit, grasp the straps on the back of the suit and pull the VC out of the vehicle. (This step may require two squad members to extricate the VC thru the hatch.)
  • Two fire team members dismount to the left front of the vehicle to assist in transferring the VC from the vehicle to the ground.
  • Lower the VC from the vehicle to the fire team members on the ground.
  • Fire team members place the VC on the ground and administer first aid.

b. Evacuate VC-Troop Compartment. Evacuate the VC through the troop compartment.

(1) Squad Leader. Commands EVACUATE VEHICLE COMMANDER.

(a) Turns RWS power OFF by pressing the RWS fire control unit ON/OFF power switch.

(b) Conducts immediate first aid.

(c) Places the VC in position for removal from the vehicle.

(d) Adjusts the seat to the full down position, being careful not to cause further injury.

(e) Unfastens the VC's seat belt.

(f) Designates fire team to evacuate the VC.

(2) Driver: Moves to the nearest covered position, halts the vehicle, and lowers the ramp.

(3) Fire Team Members. Two fire team members remove the injured VC from the vehicle, lay him on the ground, and perform first aid, as required.

c. Evacuate Driver-Troop Compartment. Evacuate the driver through the troop compartment.

(1) Vehicle Commander. Commands EVACUATE THE DRIVER

NOTE: If the driver is unable to halt the vehicle, a squad member must move forward, lower the driver's seat, and turn the master electrical power switch to the off position to stop the engine. The vehicle will slowly come to a stop on level ground.

(2) Squad Leader--

(a) The squad leader removes the Javelin round from the stowage cradle and places it in the center of the troop compartment or directs a squad member to remove the Javelin round from the stowage cradle and place the round in the center of the troop compartment.

(b) The squad leader rotates the squad leader display out of the way.

(c) The squad leader directs a fire team to evacuate the driver.

(3) Fire Team Leader. Directs a fire team member to evacuate the driver.

(4) Fire Team Member--

(a) The designated fire team member removes his LBV but retains his body armor.

(b) The designated fire team member crawls forward through the driver's compartment access and unbuckles the driver's seat belt.

(c) The designated fire team member releases the seatback release handle and lowers the driver's seat backrest.

(d) The designated fire team member administers immediate first aid.

(e) The soldier pulls the driver backwards out of his seat towards the troop compartment.

(f) The soldier reclines rearward over the Javelin missile stowage rack and passes the driver's body over his as other fire team members pull the driver into the troop compartment.

(g) Fire team members remove the driver from the vehicle, if possible, and administer first aid.

d. Evacuate Driver-Driver's Hatch. Evacuate the driver through the driver's hatch.

(1) Vehicle Commander. Commands EVACUATE THE DRIVER.

(a) Lowers the wire cutter.

(b) Opens the driver's hatch. If the driver's hatch is damaged and will not open, a squad member evacuates the driver back into the troop compartment (See Evacuate Driver-Troop Compartment).

(c) The VC duties can be performed by the squad leader or a squad member.

(2) Squad Leader--

(a) Removes Javelin round from the stowage rack and places it in the middle of the troop compartment.

(b) Designates fire team to evacuate driver.

(c) Designates a fire team to provide a replacement driver, check serviceability, make repairs if necessary, and continue the mission.

(3) Fire Team Leader--

(a) Designates a solider to evacuate the driver.

(b) Directs the remainder of the fire team to dismount and execute the evacuation.

(4) Fire Team Members--

(a) The designated solider removes his LBV and retains his body armor.

(b) The soldier moves forward behind the driver and releases the seatback release handle and lowers the seatback.

(c) The designated fire team member administers immediate first aid.

(d) The solider disconnects the driver's CVC helmet and seat belt.

(e) The designated soldier remains in the vehicle and assists in the removal of the driver by untangling his legs as necessary.

(f) The fire team dismounts and executes the evacuation.

(g) One fire team member mounts the vehicle from the front and assists the VC in evacuating the driver. If the driver is wearing a CVC suit, grasp the straps on the back of the suit and pull the driver out of the vehicle.

(h) Two fire team members dismount to the left of the vehicle to assist by taking the driver from the VC and other fire team member.

(5) Vehicle Commander and Designated Fire Team Member--

(a) The VC crosses the driver's arms over his chest. (If this is not possible, he wraps a belt around the driver's chest to raise him.)

(b) The VC and the fire team member pull the driver out of the vehicle and hand him to the fire team members on the ground.

(c) The fire team members on the ground take the driver and lay him on the ground and administer first aid.

e. Evacuate Squad Member. Evacuate an injured squad member.

(1) Squad/Fire Team Leader. Informs the VC that a squad member is injured.

(2) Vehicle Commander. Commands EVACUATE FIRE TEAM MEMBER.

(3) Driver. Moves to the nearest covered position, halts the vehicle, and lowers the ramp.

NOTE: Depending on which soldier is injured, the squad leader designates which fire team will assist in evacuating the casualty. If the squad leader or fire team leader is injured, the next senior man takes charge.

(4) Squad/Fire Team Members. Two fire team members remove the injured member, lay him on the ground, and perform first aid, as needed.

Crew Drill 3. EXTINGUISH A FIRE (CREW) (Upon automatic or manual discharge of the automatic fire extinguishing system)

SITUATION: The ICV crew and squad are mounted. The VC alerts personnel of a fire.

REQUIRED ACTIONS:

a. Extinguish a fire in the engine compartment.

WARNING

Engine fire extinguisher assemblies contain HFC-125 (FE25). HFC-125 is a health hazard. Exposure to skin can cause freezing, and inhaling high concentrations may cause respiratory effects such as shortness of breath and produce heart rhythm irregularities.

(1) Vehicle Commander. Commands FIRE, ENGINE COMPARTMENT.

(a) Alerts the soldiers of an engine compartment fire by the intercommunications system or by voice command if the intercommunications system does not work.

(b) Presses power key on RWS integrated fire control unit and turns RWS power off.

(c) Secures the portable fire extinguisher.

(d) Evacuates the vehicle.

(2) Driver--

(a) Stops the vehicle.

(b) If the automatic fire suppression system has not extinguished the engine fire, he manually discharges the second-shot fire extinguisher assembly by momentarily holding the spring-loaded ENGINE MANUAL DISCHARGE toggle switch, located on the CONTROL ELECTRONICS PANEL, in the up position.

(c) Manually discharges the first-shot fire extinguisher assembly by holding the spring-loaded ENGINE MANUAL DISCHARGE toggle switch, located on the CONTROL ELECTRONICS PANEL, in the up position for a minimum of five seconds.

(d) Lowers the ramp.

(e) Shuts down the engine by turning the auxiliary and electrical master switch off or pulls the fuel cut-off handle to the OFF position.

(f) Disconnects the CVC helmet and unfastens the seat belt.

(g) Secures his weapon.

(h) Secures portable fire extinguishers.

(i) Evacuates the vehicle through the driver's hatch, if possible. If the driver is unable to evacuate through the driver's hatch, he exits through the ramp.

(3) Squad Members--

(a) Disconnect seat belts.

(b) Squad leader or fire team leader pulls the quick disconnect to release the headsets.

(c) Secure their weapons.

(d) Evacuate the vehicle through the ramp or ramp access door.

NOTE: If the fire is not extinguished, use the portable fire extinguishers.

b. Extinguish a fire in the troop compartment.

NOTE: The troop compartment fire extinguisher assemblies contain FN-200. When dispersed, the concentration inside the vehicle is considered to be non-toxic.

(1) Squad Leader or Fire Team Leader. Alerts the VC of a troop compartment fire by intercommunications system or by voice command if the intercommunications system does not work. Announces FIRE, TROOP COMPARTMENT.

(2) Vehicle Commander. Alerts the soldiers of a troop compartment fire by the intercommunications system or by voice command if the intercommunications system does not work. Commands FIRE, TROOP COMPARTMENT.

(a) Presses power key on RWS integrated fire control unit and turns RWS power OFF.

(b) Secures the portable fire extinguisher.

(c) Evacuates the vehicle.

(3) Driver--

(a) Stops the vehicle in a position that provides cover and/or concealment, if possible.

(b) If automatic fire extinguishing system has failed to operate properly manually discharges the fire extinguisher assemblies in the troop compartment by moving and holding the spring-loaded TROOP MANUAL discharge toggle switch, located on the CONTROL ELECTRONICS PANEL, in the up position.

(c) Lowers the ramp.

(d) Shuts down the engine by turning the auxiliary and electrical master switch off or pulls the fuel cut-off handle to the OFF position.

(e) Pulls the quick disconnect to release the CVC helmet and seat belt.

(f) Unfastens his seat belt.

(g) Secures his weapon.

(h) Opens driver's hatch and locks it in position.

(i) Secures the portable fire extinguisher.

(j) Evacuates the vehicle through the driver's hatch.

(4) Fire Team Members--

(a) Unfasten seat belts.

(b) Secure weapons.

(c) Evacuate the vehicle through the ramp.

NOTE: If the fire is not extinguished, use the portable fire extinguishers.

Crew Drill 4. DISMOUNT THE VEHICLE (PLATOON/SQUAD)

SITUATION: The platoon/squad is mounted and must dismount. The platoon leader orders the platoon/section to prepare to dismount.

REQUIRED ACTIONS: (Figure E-14).

Figure E-14. ICV order of dismount.

Figure E-14. ICV order of dismount.

Figure E-14. ICV order of dismount (continued).

Figure E-14. ICV order of dismount (continued).

a. The platoon leader selects the dismount point.

b. The platoon leader orders personnel to dismount.

(1) Gives the warning PREPARE TO DISMOUNT.

(2) Designates dismounted platoon's weapons composition; for example, "No Javelins," "Heavy on AT4s," or "All M240B."

(3) Gives dismount instructions for each ICV; for example, "Right" (left), distance "Fifty meters," and any identifying terrain feature "Backside of hill." The VC may also give dismount instructions to the squad aboard. The VC can identify the location to the squad/team leader through the squad leader's display (SLD).

c. Squad/fire team leader(s) monitors commands. He then alerts the soldiers in the troop compartment.

d. The drivers move the vehicles to the designated dismount point and orient the front of the vehicle toward the enemy.

e. The VC orients the RWS to provide overwatching support and supporting fire, if necessary.

f. The platoon leader gives the command DISMOUNT.

g. The driver stops the vehicle and lowers the ramp or the VC orders the ramp access door opened.

h. The squad members dismount in the specified order and then move to covered and concealed positions. The squad leader establishes contact with the platoon leader.

i. The mounted element occupies appropriate covered or concealed positions and overwatches the dismounted element with the appropriate weapon or maintains a hide position until called forward to link up with the dismounted element.

j. Platoon/squad leader reports to higher headquarters.

k. All squad members search for enemy positions and respond to orders.

l. Squad and fire team leaders position or reposition squad members (if needed).

m. The platoon sergeant or section leader repositions the ICVs, as necessary.

CREW DRILL 5. MOUNT THE VEHICLE (PLATOON/SECTION)

SITUATION: The squads are dismounted and must remount the vehicle. The platoon/squad leader orders the platoon to mount its vehicles.

REQUIRED ACTIONS: (Figure E-15).

Figure E-15. ICV order of mount.

Figure E-15. ICV order of mount (continued).

Figure E-15. ICV order of mount (continued).

a. The platoon/squad leader(s) gives the order PREPARE TO MOUNT or the appropriate signal to the squads to mount their ICVs, and designates a mount/remount point.

b. Both elements (mounted and dismounted) move to the mount/remount point using covered and concealed routes.

c. The crew, using the appropriate weapons, over watches primary enemy avenues of approach and provides supporting fire and smoke, if necessary. The VC orders the driver to lower the ramp or the squad to enter through the ramp access door.

d. The platoon/squad leader order MOUNT. (The order to mount may come with clarifying instructions; for example, "1st Squad and 3rd squad, provide a base of fire until the 2nd Squad and weapons are mounted.")

e. Each squad mounts in the order specified. The squad leader designates which fire team mounts first; for example, Team A mount first, Team B provide over watching fires.

f. Soldiers mount/remount the vehicle in reverse sequence of dismount.

g. The platoon leader/VC prepares for mounted operations.

(1) Each squad leader accounts for all personnel and equipment in the ICV and reports to the VC. Announces, ALL UP.

(2) The platoon leader designates a direction of movement, formation, and movement technique from the mount point.

(3) The platoon leader establishes visual or radio contact with the other VCs.

(4) The team leader ensures the dismounted weapons are on SAFE once the soldiers have mounted.

(5) The VC orders the driver to raise the ramp or the fire team to close the ramp access door.

h. The platoon leader reports to the company commander.

CREW DRILL 6. CHANGE FORMATION (MOUNTED) (PLATOON)

SITUATION: The platoon is moving and must change formation. The platoon leader gives arm-and-hand signal, flag signal, or radio for change of formation.

REQUIRED ACTIONS: (Figures E-16 through E-31).

a. The platoon leader directs the formation change by giving the standard arm-and-hand signals, flag signals, or by radio.

b. The VCs relay arm-and-hand or flag signals.

c. The VCs direct drivers into position in the new formation. The driver maintains the position in the formation based on the platoon leader and wingmen.

d. The VCs traverse the RWS toward likely enemy positions or assigned sectors and scan for targets in their sectors. The VCs will scan the limits of their sectors using the RWS position indicator (for example, scan from 12 to 2).

Figure E-16. Line formation.

Figure E-16. Line formation.

Figure E-17. Line to wedge formation.

Figure E-17. Line to wedge formation.

Figure E-18. Line to column formation.

Figure E-18. Line to column formation.

Figure E-19. Line to echelon formation.

Figure E-19. Line to echelon formation.

Figure E-20. Column formation.

Figure E-20. Column formation.

Figure E-21. Column to line formation.

Figure E-21. Column to line formation.

Figure E-22. Column to echelon formation.

Figure E-22. Column to echelon formation.

Figure E-23.  Column to wedge formation.

Figure E-23. Column to wedge formation.

Figure E-24. Echelon formation (right).

Figure E-24. Echelon formation (right).

Figure E-25. Echelon to line formation.

Figure E-25. Echelon to line formation.

Figure E-26. Echelon to wedge formation.

Figure E-26. Echelon to wedge formation.

Figure E-27. Echelon to column formation.

Figure E-27. Echelon to column formation.

Figure E-28. Wedge formation.

Figure E-28. Wedge formation.

Figure E-29. Wedge to column formation.

Figure E-29. Wedge to column formation.

Figure E-30. Wedge to line formation.

Figure E-30. Wedge to line formation.

Figure E-31. Wedge to echelon formation.

Figure E-31. Wedge to echelon formation.

CREW DRILL 7. SECURE AT THE HALT (PLATOON)

SITUATION: The platoon is moving and must halt.

REQUIRED ACTIONS: (Figures E-32 through E-35).

a. The platoon leader gives the arm-and-hand signals for herringbone or coil formation.

b. The platoon halts in the herringbone or coil formation.

c. Each VC ensures his vehicle is correctly positioned, using cover and concealment.

d. The platoon leader orders the squads to dismount and provide local security. (Dismount IAW the task, Dismount the Vehicle.)

e. The squads occupy hasty fighting positions, as designated by the squad leader, in the vicinity of their respective ICV. The squad leader contacts the team leader and adjusts security positions as necessary.

f. Soldiers continue to observe designated sectors.

Figure E-32. Wedge to coil formation.

Figure E-32. Wedge to coil formation.

Figure E-33. Wedge to herringbone formation.

Figure E-33. Wedge to herringbone formation.

Figure E-34. Column to coil formation.

Figure E-34. Column to coil formation.

Figure E-35. Column to herringbone formation.

Figure E-35. Column to herringbone formation.

CREW DRILL 8. EXECUTE ACTION RIGHT OR LEFT (PLATOON)

SITUATION: The platoon is moving and must execute action right or left.

REQUIRED ACTIONS: (Figures E-36 through E-43.)

a. The platoon leader signals action right or left using arm-and-hand, flags, or radio.

b. The drivers immediately execute a turn in the direction indicated while moving into a line formation.

(1) The platoon sergeant orients his vehicle on the platoon leader's vehicle.

(2) Wingmen orient their ICVs on the platoon leader and platoon sergeant vehicles.

c. The platoon leader orders the VCs to seek covered positions for their vehicles or has them continue to move in the direction indicated.

d. The VCs orient the RWS toward the enemy, and the VCs search for targets.

e. The platoon leader determines if it is necessary to dismount the rifle squads.

f. The platoon leader reports the situation to the company commander, if necessary.

Figure E-36. Action right from line.

Figure E-36. Action right from line.

Figure E-37. Action right from wedge.

Figure E-37. Action right from wedge.

Figure E-38. Action right from column, wingman on left.

Figure E-38. Action right from column, wingman on left.

Figure E-39. Action right from column, wingman on right.

Figure E-39. Action right from column, wingman on right.

Figure E-40. Action left from a line.

Figure E-40. Action left from a line.

Figure E-41. Action left from a wedge.

Figure E-41. Action left from a wedge.

Figure E-42. Action left from a column, wingman on right.

Figure E-42. Action left from a column, wingman on right.

Figure E-43. Action left from a column, wingman on left.

Figure E-43. Action left from a column, wingman on left.

CREW DRILL 10. DESTROY OR ABANDON AN INFANTRY CARRIER VEHICLE (CREW)

SITUATION: Given an order to destroy or abandon the ICV, AT4, Javelin, 15 one-pound blocks of TNT (or equivalent), equipment to complete an electric or nonelectric firing circuit, or two incendiary grenades, and a vehicle crew and a rifle squad.

REQUIRED ACTIONS:

a. Destruction by Removal or Destruction of Main Components.

(1) Vehicle Commander--

(a) Removes the M2 machine gun or MK19 grenade launcher backplate and destroys it.

(b) Smashes the radios.

(c) Execute the FBCB2 electronic self-destruct function and smashes computer screen.

(d) Secures his protective mask and individual weapon, equipment, and night vision goggles.

(2) Driver--

(a) Cuts the coolant lines.

(b) Cuts the engine oil hose.

(c) Smashes the AN/VVS-2 night vision viewer or drivers vision enhancer (DVE) (M2A3 only).

(d) Secures his protective mask, individual weapon, and gear.

(3) Squad Members--

(a) Smash the squad leader's display.

(b) Secure all night vision devices.

(c) Secure dismounted radio.

(d) Secure the Javelin command launch unit (CLU).

(e) Secure their protective mask and individual weapons and gear and evacuate the vehicle.

b. Destruction by Fire.

(1) Vehicle Commander--

(a) Traverses the turret to 4100 mils.

(b) Secures his protective mask and individual weapon.

(2) Driver--

NOTE: Discharge the automatic fire suppression system prior to attempting to destroy the vehicle by fire. This will prevent accidental activation of the automatic fire suppression system and fire being inadvertently extinguished.

(a) Manually discharges the second-shot fire extinguisher assembly, by momentarily holding the spring-loaded ENGINE MANUAL DISCHARGE toggle switch, located on the CONTROL ELECTRONICS PANEL, in the up position.

(b) Manually discharges the first-shot fire extinguisher assembly by holding the spring-loaded ENGINE MANUAL DISCHARGE toggle switch, located on the CONTROL ELECTRONICS PANEL, in the up position for a minimum of five seconds.

(c) Lowers the ramp.

(d) Shuts down the engine by turning the auxiliary and electrical master switch OFF or pulls the fuel cut-off handle to the OFF position.

(e) Opens the engine compartment access door.

(f) Opens the main fuel manual shutoff valve and main fuel drain valve and cuts the fuel lines.

(g) Secures his weapon and protective mask and evacuates the vehicle.

(3) Squad Members--

(a) Open the cargo hatch.

(b) Secure the weapon and protective mask and evacuates the vehicle.

(4) Vehicle Commander--

(a) Secures two incendiary grenades.

(b) Places one grenade in the engine compartment and one in the driver's compartment and evacuates the vehicle.

c. Destruction by Antiarmor Fire.

(1) Vehicle Commander and Driver evacuate the vehicle.

(2) Squad Leader--

(a) Has the squad members dismount with protective masks, individual weapons, and light antitank weapons (AT4s).

(b) Has the antiarmor specialist secure the Javelin CLU and missiles.

(c) Moves the team past the minimum range of the Javelin (65-75 meters) and within maximum range of the AT4 (300 meters).

(d) Directs a volley of fire, aiming at the armament, engine, and drive train components.

d. Destruction by Demolition.

(1) Squad Leader.Directs fire team to destroy the vehicle by demolition.

(2) Fire Team Leader and Members--

(a) Prepare three 1-pound blocks of TNT or the equivalent.

(b) Place the charges as follows:

  • On the receiver of the M2 or MK 19.
  • On the FBCB2 and squad leaders display.
  • On the RWS.

(c) Prepare six 2-pound charges using 1-pound blocks of TNT or the equivalent.

(d) Place the charges as follows:

  • One charge on the accessory end of the engine.
  • The second and third charges on the engine - one on the left side and the other on the right side.
  • The fourth charge between the engine and the transmission.
  • The fifth and sixth charges on the left and right front drive wheels.

(3) Squad Leader--

(a) Provides for dual priming to minimize the possibility of a misfire.

(b) Connects all charges (the charges for the RWS and engine compartment) for simultaneous detonation.

(c) Moves squad members and crew (with protective masks and individual weapons) to a covered area.

(d) Detonates the charge.

NOTE: Ammunition and equipment that are not destroyed by the detonation should be removed from the vehicle and destroyed by other methods.

c. Destruction by Using Natural Surroundings. Squad members--

  • Remove the major components (backplate from the M2 or MK19, FBCB2, squad leaders display, and RWS) and submerge them in water (lakes, ponds, rivers, and so forth). If possible, they submerge the vehicle.
  • If no body of water is near, destroy as appropriate and widely disperse components, preferably into heavy underbrush or inaccessible areas.

CREW DRILL 11. PERFORM BEFORE-, DURING-, AND AFTER-COMBAT

OPERATION CHECKS (CREW)

SITUATION: Perform operation checks during assembly area procedures, after an engagement, or during consolidation and reorganization.

REQUIRED ACTIONS:

a. Before-combat operation checks.

NOTE: Follow all safety procedures while working in and around the RWS, and ensure that no weapons are loaded with ammunition when performing the before-combat operation checklist.

(1) Squad Leader (personally or through coordination with the team leaders)--

(a) Checks to ensure that all personnel are properly wearing personal protective equipment IAW the unit SOP and commander's guidance (for example, protective mask, protective body armor, helmet, nerve-agent antidote).

(b) Ensures that all personnel have hearing protection.

(c) Ensures that all personnel have their assigned weapons and the prescribed ammunition load.

(d) Checks to ensure that all weapons are loaded and placed on SAFE.

(e) Ensures that ammunition and pyrotechnics are properly stowed (for example, grenades, flares, small arms ammunition, smoke, AT-4s, Javelins, Claymores, hand grenades).

(f) Ensures that all target acquisition devices (for example, NVD, binoculars, AN/PVS-7/14,) are properly stowed.

(g) Ensures that the hand grenades are worn properly.

(h) Ensures that all dismount equipment is functional (for example, test fires the weapons, conducts a digital communications check and AN/PRC 119).

(i) For night operations, ensures that all NVD and other target acquisition equipment are mounted and available and are operational and zeroed to the appropriate weapon for night operations.

(j) Ensures that all personnel have additional equipment required to accomplish the mission IAW METT-TC (for example, minefield marking set, wire cutters, obstacle breach kit).

(k) Reports the status of the squad to the platoon sergeant.

(l) Ensures all personnel and vehicles are camouflaged.

(2) Vehicle Commander. Ensures the following before-combat-operation checks are performed.

(a) Ensures that the RWS is on SAFE (electrical).

(b) Ensures that all vehicle weapons systems are properly installed and the prescribed ammunition is uploaded and stowed IAW the stowage and strapping diagram, vehicle load plan, and platoon SOP.

(c) Ensures RWS is operational and boresighted.

(d) Conducts a prefire check in accordance with the appropriate TM.

(e) Ensures the vehicle communications systems are operational.

(f) Checks individual equipment and weapons of the driver and gunner.

(g) Reports the status of the vehicle to the squad or section leader.

(3) Driver--

(a) Conducts before-operation-hull PMCS IAW TM 9-2320-311-10-1, TM 9-2320-311-01 or TM 9-2320-311-2.

(b) Reports the status of the vehicle to the VC.

(4) Platoon Sergeant--

(a) Consolidates the reports from the squad leaders and VCs, and reports the platoon's status to the platoon leader.

(b) Checks the trauma specialist for complete aid bag.

(c) Checks the FIST for individual weapons and equipment, operational mission equipment (for example, laser range finder), operational communications (for example, digital message device and radios), and any other mission-essential equipment.

(d) Checks other attachments as required.

(5) Platoon Leader--

(a) Checks the special equipment required to execute the mission and designates where it will be carried.

(b) Reports the platoon status to the company commander NLT the mission start time.

b. During-Combat Operation Checks. During-combat operation checks should be conducted in a secure location during a lull in the battle.

(1) Squad Leader or Team Leader--

(a) Ensures the accountability of all soldiers and equipment.

(b) Supervises aid to injured soldiers.

(c) Ensures the weapons are on SAFE.

(d) Checks ammunition status, gets more ammunition from vehicle if possible, cross-levels when necessary, and reports the critical shortages to the platoon sergeant.

(e) Reports the status of personnel, equipment, and ammunition to the platoon sergeant.

(f) Ensures dismounted security is established.

(2) Vehicle Commander--

(a) Ensures the RWS is in SAFE mode.

(b) Checks ammunition status for the RWS, performs reload drills when required, cross-levels from other ICVs when necessary, and reports the critical shortages to the section leader or platoon sergeant.

(c) Verifies the boresight of all weapons systems.

(d) Checks for damaged equipment.

(e) Ensures communications (radios and intercommunications) are operable.

(f) Conducts a visual inspection of the RWS.

(g) Performs during-operation RWS PMCS IAW TM 9-2320-311-01, TM 9-2320-311-01 or TM 9-2320-311-2.

(h) Reports the status of the vehicle to the section leader or squad leader.

(i) Supervises expedient vehicle repairs, if necessary.

(3) Driver--

(a) Performs during-operation-hull PMCS IAW TM 9-2320-311-10-1, TM 9-2320-311-01 or TM 9-2320-311-2.

(b) Conducts a visual inspection of the exterior of the vehicle.

(c) Checks all bolts and nuts on the wheels.

(d) Checks fuel status and oil levels.

(e) Checks the engine compartment for any visible signs of damage.

(f) Reports the status to the VC.

(4) Platoon Sergeant--

(a) Reports the status of the platoon to the platoon leader.

(b) Supervises the evacuation of causalities.

(c) Reports the location and status of inoperative vehicles and the WIA or KIA to the platoon leader.

(d) Coordinates for resupply, if required (for example, POL, ammunition).

(5) Platoon Leader--

(a) Reports the status of the platoon to the company commander (if resupply or repairs are necessary to complete the mission, if required by SOP, or if the platoon has suffered combat or maintenance vehicle losses).

c. After-Combat Operation Checks. After-combat operation checks are to be forwarded in conjunction with consolidation and reorganization, and the infantry is normally dismounted and provides the local security while the ICV crew performs the necessary checks.

(1) Squad Leader or Team Leader--

(a) Ensures that dismounted security is established.

(b) Checks for injured soldiers.

(c) Accounts for all personnel and equipment.

(d) Checks and ensures that all weapons are on SAFE.

(e) Reestablishes the chain of command.

(f) Checks the status of ammunition and supplies.

(g) Ensures that hasty positions are prepared, ensures that the key weapons are manned, and replaces vehicle crewmembers, as needed.

(h) Ensures that soldiers and vehicles are camouflaged as necessary.

(i) Reports the status of soldiers, equipment, and ammunition to the platoon sergeant.

(2) Vehicle Commander--

(a) Ensure RWS is in SAFE mode.

(b) Ensures that ammunition resupply is conducted for all weapons on the vehicle.

(c) Conducts a visual inspection of the RWS for damages.

(d) Checks communications (radios and intercommunications) for damage.

(e) Performs after-operation-RWS PMCS IAW TM 9-2320-311-10-1, TM 9-2320-311-01 or TM 9-2320-311-2.

(f) Confirms zero with a few rounds.

(g) Reports the status of the vehicle to the section leader or VC.

(3) Driver--

(a) Conducts a visual inspection of the vehicle exterior.

(b) Performs after-operation-hull PMCS IAW TM 9-2320-311-10-1, TM 9-2320-311-01 or TM 9-2320-311-2.

(c) Checks all bolts and nuts on the wheels.

(d) Checks fuel status and oil levels.

(e) Checks the engine compartment for any visible signs of damage.

(f) Reports the status to the VC.

(4) Platoon Sergeant--

(a) Reports vehicle, soldiers, equipment, and ammunitions status to the platoon leader and company executive officer or first sergeant IAW the unit SOP.

(b) Supervises evacuation of wounded soldiers, inoperative equipment, and vehicles.

(c) Requests replacements and resupply (personnel, equipment, batteries, POL, ammunition) from the first sergeant IAW the unit SOP.

(d) Supervises the repair of equipment and vehicles within the capability.

(5) Platoon Leader--

(a) Determines and disseminates the lessons learned with the platoon sergeant and squad leaders.

(b) Reports the platoon status to the company commander.



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