Find a Security Clearance Job!

Military



Appendix D

Sources of Environmental Assistance

Trained professionals are available within each unit, organization, or installation. Should soldiers, Marines, or their leaders require additional information or assistance, they must seek help immediately. In general, a POC should be located at the installation's environmental office, normally a part of the DPW at Army installations, the facilities or base engineer office on Marine Corps installations, or the STARC for the NG. Additional assistance is available from the DOL (Army) or the G4 (Marine Corps), the safety office, and the supporting DRMO. Within the chain of command, the key personnel are the ECO and the HW coordinator. These personnel are found at company level and above. Since these duties are performed as an additional duty at company and battalion levels, the responsible personnel may be in any of a variety of offices. This appendix contains additional POCs that may be useful.

BASEOPS/SUPPORTING INSTALLATION STAFF ASSISTANCE

ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE

 

The EMO is staffed with scientists and engineers responsible for developing and implementing the installation's environmental programs. This office is usually a division within the installation DPW for the Army, the Directorate of Engineering for the USMC, or the Facilities Management Office (FMO) of the STARC for the NG. The installation's environmental program includes the following five general components, and many EMOs are organized accordingly:

  • Compliance elements monitor current operations, and ensure that units follow environmental guidelines.
  • Pollution prevention elements manage installation initiatives such as source reduction, HW minimization, recycling, and materials substitution.
  • Natural and cultural resources management elements manage installation conservation initiatives for forests, wildlife, wetlands, and historical resources.
  • Restoration elements manage clean up of contamination sites on the installation.
  • Planning and documentation elements address possible environmental impacts of future operations and activities.

DIRECTORATE OF LOGISTICS/G4

 

Responsibilities of Army DOLs/G4s, or Marine Corps G4s, include management of POL and HM. The directorate/staff section also exercises environmental control and oversight of HM (including ammunition) maintenance, transportation, and storage activities.

DIRECTORATE OF PLANS, TRAINING, AND MOBILIZATION/G3

 

Responsibilities of Army DPTMs/G3s, or Marine Corps G3s, include installation/unit operations and training. These offices coordinate all training activities, including budgeting, development and maintenance of training areas, the ITAM program, and mission priorities. The DPTM also coordinates the range division and has overall responsibility for range operations, maintenance, and construction.

STAFF JUDGE ADVOCATE

 

The SJA provides legal advice and assistance in the interpretation and application of environmental laws and rules to installation activities. This process/serviceis particularly important when assessing the environmental impact of a new initiative (such as construction).

PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICER/G5

 

The PAO is the official spokesperson for the installation/unit and manages public involvement activities and responses (particularly during public controversy) in close coordination with other key installation/unit members. This is particularly important when assessing the environmental impact of a new initiative (such as construction).

OCCUPATIONAL AND SAFETY HEALTH OFFICER

 

OSHA works closely with the environmental staff on programs to help prevent accidents that could threaten or damage human health and the environment. Hazard communication, MSDSs, and OSHA-mandated training are the purview of the safety office.

PREVENTIVE MEDICINE OFFICER/SURGEON

 

The preventive medicine office is the POC for the medical monitoring program and work-related health problems. This office, often co-located with medical units or hospitals, can provide critical information concerning public health issues, such as the use of pesticides.

FIRE DEPARTMENT

 

The fire department provides fire fighting and spill response support to the installation. In many instances, the fire department will have highly trained spill response personnel who provide expert advice on spill reaction measures.

DEFENSE REUTILIZATION AND MARKETING OFFICE

 

The DRMO works closely with DPW and DOL to store and provide for disposal of solid waste, including HW generated at the installation.

This DOD organization becomes critical to units attempting to turn in potentially hazardous substances or HM. Unit personnel having questions on turn-in procedures for potentially hazardous substances or HM should check with the receiving DRMO facility to determine documentation and packaging requirements.

SOURCES OF ASSISTANCE DURING TACTICAL OPERATIONS

 

While units may be able to benefit from the assistance of standard installation or BASOPS support during tactical operations, the likelihood is that they will only be minor, perhaps supporting players to provide assistance. Tactical operations will shift more support requirements to operational staffs rather than installation staff support. Identified below are some of those likely/potential sources of assistance.

OPERATIONAL/DEPLOYMENT STAFF ASSISTANCE

 

The unit staff takes on a much larger role in environmental assistance when a unit is deployed or in an operational status. The load will tend to rest on these staffs (see Chapter 1 for a discussion of unit staff responsibilities) in the cases of deployment to relatively remote, OCONUS locations. As time goes on and the duration of stay increases, it is very likely that the command will establish organizations like the BCCA and its subordinate BCAT. These organizations will provide tactical/operational commanders with the military environmental protection support they need.

BCCA AND BCAT

 

These two organizations have become de facto doctrinal organizations to support the needs of the commander when units are deployed outside of established locations throughout the world. The concept was developed and successfully tested by United States Army Europe (USAREUR). These organizations perform an important and vital role that essentially replaces the roles performed by installation staffs, but in a tactical/operational arena. They may draw on resources from either home base or theater installation sources, but they are tactical/operational locations such as base camps (which they typically support) and are not installations, but tactical/operational sites. See CALL Newsletter 99-9, Integrating Military Environmental Protection, for insights into how these organizations provide assistance in a tactical/operational setting.

JOINT ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT BOARD (JEMB)

 

Operational or tactical Army or Marine Corps units may operate in the theater or as part of a joint task force and be required to interface with the actions of a temporary board, the JEMB, that the joint commander or his designated CJTF may activate. The JEMB establishes policies, procedures, priorities, and the overall direction for environmental management requirements in the theater according to overseas baseline environmental guidance and/or the final governing standards in effect for the countries within the AOR. If appropriate, the board may assume responsibility for the preparation of the environmental management support plan. The JEMB is spelled out in JP 3-34.

HOST NATION (HN)

 

Depending on the capabilities of the HN and agreements that have been made, HN support to the tactical/operational commander is possible. Senior level staffs will typically be the ones to initiate and secure this type of support.

CONTRACTOR SUPPORT

 

Environmental support assistance for the tactical/operational commander may be provided by a contractor. This type of contracting has already occurred in places like Bosnia. Coordination for this support will likely come through the BCCA, the US Army Corps of Engineers, or a similar agency with contracting capability.

CENTER FOR ARMY LESSONS LEARNED (CALL) DATABASE

 

The database at the CALL is beginning to add data that supports the needs of the commander in the area of military environmental protection. A host of lessons learned and examples of other units' actions/experiences are becoming available for use.

Web site: http://call.army.mil/call.html.

OTHER SOURCES OF ASSISTANCE

 

Regardless of your location there are a series of sources of assistance that are available to you if you have the ability to phone or contact them by e-mail, or other electronic means. Others can be easily identified through the use of the Defense Environmental Network and Information Exchange (DENIX) website.

MARINE ENVIRONMENTAL HOME PAGE

  Web site: http://www.usmc.mil/environmental

DEFENSE ENVIRONMENTAL NETWORK AND INFORMATION EXCHANGE (DENIX)

 

Operated by DOD, this website is sponsored by the Department of Environmental Security Corporate Information Management.

It provides timely access to environmental legislative compliance, restoration, clean up and DOD guidance information.



NEWSLETTER
Join the GlobalSecurity.org mailing list