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Appendix K

Example Tools And Procedures

There are numerous factors that must be considered when employing target acquisition assets on the battlefield. The purpose of this appendix is to provide a collection of formats, procedures, and ideas that have been collected from Combat Training Centers (CTCs), and TO&E units that can be used to facilitate radar mission planning and employment. Most of the forms and procedures can be modified to meet changing unit requirements

FIREFINDER RADAR SECTION TROOP LEADING PROCEDURES

Employment of Firefinder radars must meet the commander's intent/guidance and be synchronized with the scheme of maneuver. Troop leading procedures and the radar section leader's involvement in the planning process are essential for successful radar employment and responsive counterfire. The radar section leader requires usable tools to facilitate mission preparation and execution. The ability to develop and issue clear warning orders, time lines, pre-combat checks, pre-combat inspections, and priorities of work are key to any successful mission.

Troop leading procedures provide the required guidance to focus the radar section's preparation for and execution of the radar employment plan. Using standard troop leading procedures helps clarify mission requirements, fix responsibilities and make the best use of available time. Troop leading procedures provide a vehicle for preparing the section for operation and help free the radar section leader to participate in the DS battalion's counterfire planning process.

SUGGESTED TROOP LEADING PROCEDURES

  • Receive the mission (SITTEMP, operations graphics, RDO/execution matrix).

    – Perform mission analysis, assess threat (S2/G2, radar section leader, section chief).

    – Review critical tasks, positioning guidance, planned zones (S2/G2, radar section leader, section chief).

    – Prioritize pre-combat inspections (PCIs) and pre-combat checks (PCCs), (radar section leader, section chief).

    – Prepare a timeline (radar section leader, section chief).

    – Conduct risk assessment/management.

  • Issue a concise warning order to your section, (radar section leader).

    – Section mission.

    – Positioning guidance.

    – Threat and counter measures.

    – PCI priorities.

    – Timeline.

  • Make a tentative plan, (radar section leader, section chief).

    – METT-TC Considerations.

    – Logistical resupply.

    – Survivability measures.

    – Section rehearsals, (site occupations/displacements, defense, etc.).

  • Initiate movement, (radar section leader, section chief).

    – Conduct PCIs.

    – Perform rehearsals.

    – Issue movement order and risk assessment.

  • Conduct reconnaissance, (radar section leader or section chief).

    – Select sites to support mission requirements.

    – Perform/coordinate survey requirements.

    – Make site assessments for survivability, maneuver support, site defense, etc.

  • Complete the plan, (radar section leader, section chief).

    – Report site assessments to S2/G2.

    – Prepare a verbal order for section.

    – Develop route strip maps, preliminary site defense plan.

    – Develop battle-tracking overlays for reconnaissance vehicle and shelter.

  • Issue the order, (radar section leader, section chief).

    – Focus on movement, positioning, site defense and survivability measures.

    – Be clear and concise.

    – Require a back brief from the section chief and senior radar operators. This should be a section huddle, each member must understand their role.

  • Supervise, (radar section leader, section chief).

    – Final PCIs.

    – Crew drill rehearsals for occupations, site, defense, shelter, and NBC operations.

    – Execution.

Troop leading procedures can and should be modified to facilitate planning and execution of each mission. The steps do not have to happen sequentially and may happen simultaneously as METT-TC dictates.

RADAR SECTION WARNING ORDER (WARNO)

The warning order (WARNO) given to the radar section must specify the initial mission statement and tasks required to perform the mission. The example in Figures K-1 and K-2, Radar Section WARNO, provide a tool for the extraction of pertinent information from the MDMP and subsequent briefings. This example can be modified as required.

Figure K-1. Radar Section Warning Order

Figure K-1. Radar Section Warning Order

Figure K-2. Radar Section Warning Order (cont.)

Figure K-2. Radar Section Warning Order (cont.)

RADAR DEPLOYMENT ORDER DA FORM 5957-R

Figure K-3. Radar deployment Order

Figure K-3. Radar deployment Order

RADAR EXECUTION MATRIX

The formal radar deployment order, Figure K-3 (RDO), can be modified to make it more useful and practical. Figure K-4 contains a format for a radar execution matrix. This matrix is a modified version of the RDO. The matrix is a valuable tool that can be used as is or modified to reflect the phases or events of an operation. Figure K-5 shows another example of a modified RDO/execution matrix. This example includes a terrain graphic. NOTE: The radar execution matrix may become classified when filled in and must be properly labeled.

Figure K-4. Radar Execution Matrix

Figure K-4. Radar Execution Matrix

Figure K-5. Example Modified RDO/Execution Matrix

Figure K-5. Example Modified RDO/Execution Matrix

QUICK REFERENCE POSITION SELECTION WORKSHEET

The following is an example of a quick reference position selection worksheet. This tool may be used with other IPB products in the selection of radar positions.

Figure K-6. Quick Reference Position Selection Worksheet

Figure K-6. Quick Reference Position Selection Worksheet

RADAR POSITIONING AND MOVEMENT SYNCHRONIZATION CHECKLIST

The radar positioning and movement synchronization checklist can be used in conjunction with the RDO or Execution Matrix, and the quick reference position selection worksheet to assist in synchronizing the radar with the fire support plan.

Figure K-7. Radar Position and Movement Synchronization Checklist

Figure K-7. Radar Position and Movement Synchronization Checklist

VOICE RADAR REGISTRATION PROCEDURE

The following is an example of how to perform a radar registration using FM voice communications.

  • BN FDC (BTRY FDC), this is (BN FDC), Perform (type) (Radar) registration at grid _______, altitude ______, over.

  • (BTRY) FDC Perform (type) (Radar) registration at grid ________, Altitude _________, out.

  • (BTRY) FDC (Radar) This is (BTRY FDC), prepare to copy, over.

  • (RADAR) (BTRY FDC) This is (Radar), prepare to copy, out.

  • (BTRY) FDC (Radar) This is (BTRY FDC), observe (type) (IE: MPI, High burst, datum plane) registration, at grid _______, altitude _______, MAX ORD _______, QE________ (specify if meters or feet), and HEIGHT OF BURST_______ (if a high burst or datum plane), firing unit grid _______, firing unit altitude ______, report ready to observe, over.

  • (RADAR) Observe (type) registration at grid _______, altitude _______, max ord ______, QE _________, and height of burst ______ (if necessary), firing unit grid _______, firing unit altitude ________, will report ready to observe, out.

  • (RADAR) (BTRY FDC) this is (Radar), ready to observe, request shot and splash, over.

  • (BTRY) FDC Request shot and splash, out.

  • (BTRY) FDC (BTRY), Shot, over.

  • (RADAR) (BTRY), Shot, out.

  • (BTRY) FDC (BTRY), Splash, over.

  • (RADAR) (BTRY), Splash, out.

  • (RADAR) (BTRY FDC) Did hit grid __________, over.

  • (BTRY) FDC Did hit grid _________, out.

At this point repeat the last 6 steps until the necessary number of good rounds have been observed by radar. BN FDC will end mission.

  • (BN FDC) (Radar) and (BTRY FDC), this is (BN FDC), End of mission, over.

  • (RADAR) End of mission, out.

  • (BTRY) FDC End of mission, out.

NOTE: Height of burst for Radar Registrations is the height of registration point plus height of ground above sea level (The height of the registration point above sea level). Radar will forward did hit information for each to BN/BTRY FDC via normal mode of communication.

VOICE RADAR ADJUST FIRE MISSION

The following is an example for performing a Radar adjust fire mission using voice FM communications.

  • (RADAR) (BN FDC), This is (Radar), Hostile weapon (Number and type of possible) firing, at grid _______, Altitude _______, Time ________, over.

  • BN FDC Hostile weapons firing at grid _________, out.

  • BN FDC (BTRY FDC), This is (BN FDC), conduct adjust fire mission with (Radar), at grid _________, Altitude _________, over.

  • (BTRY) FDC Conduct (Radar) Fire Mission, at grid __________, altitude ___________, out.

  • (BTRY) FDC (Radar), This is (BTRY FDC), authenticate _________, over.

  • (RADAR) I authenticate __________, out.

  • (BTRY) FDC (Radar), This is (BTRY FDC), MAX ORD ________, QE_________, ALTITUDE _________. Request ready to observe, over.

NOTE: (BTRY) will also have to provide grid and altitude of firing BTRY (center gun) if Radar does not have this information already.

  • (RADAR) Max ord _______, QE _______, ALTITUDE __________ out. (At this point, wait while Radar loads their computer with information.)

  • (RADAR) (BTRY FDC), This is (Radar). Ready to observe, request shot and splash, 1 round, over.

  • (BTRY) FDC Request shot and splash, 1 round, out. (Wait for guns to fire.)

  • (BTRY) FDC (BTRY), Shot, over.

  • (RADAR) (BTRY), Shot, out.

  • (BTRY) FDC (BTRY), Splash, over.

  • (RADAR) (BTRY), Splash, out.

  • (RADAR) (BTRY FDC), Did-hit grid is _________, over.

  • (BTRY) FDC Did-hit grid _______, out. (At this point (BTRY) makes corrections.) NOTE: Subsequent adjust rounds may be required.

  • (RADAR) (BTRY FDC), This is (Radar), fire for effect, request shot and splash, over.

  • (BTRY) FDC Fire for effect, request shot and splash, out.

At this point, Radar will follow the mission, like a friendly fire mission, to compile did-hit information.

  • (BTRY) FDC (BTRY FDC), Shot, over.

  • (RADAR) (BTRY FDC), Shot, out.

  • (BTRY) FDC (BTRY FDC), Splash, over.

  • (RADAR) (BTRY FDC), Splash, out.

Repeat the previous 4 steps until (BTRY) completes rounds and Radar logs did-hit information.

  • (BTRY) FDC (Radar), This is (BTRY FDC), Rounds complete, over.

  • (RADAR) (BTRY FDC), Rounds complete, out.

  • (RADAR) (BTRY FDC), This is (Radar). End of mission, over.

  • (BTRY) FDC (Radar), End of mission, out.

Radar will then forward did-hit information to BN/BTRY FDC via normal mode of communications.

JOINT AIRLIFT INSPECTION CHECKLIST

DD Form 2133 is used by the Military Airlift Command for the inspection of equipment to be loaded on military aircraft.

Figure K-8. Joint Airlift Inspection Record (side 1)

Figure K-8. Joint Airlift Inspection Record (side 1)

Figure K-9. Joint Airlift Inspection Record (side 2)

Figure K-9. Joint Airlift Inspection Record (side 2)

RISK MANAGEMENT WORKSHEET

The risk management worksheet provides a starting point to logically track the process of assessing hazards and risks. It is used to document risk management steps taken during the planning, preparation, and execution of training and combat missions and tasks. Use the following guidelines for completing the worksheet:

  • Block A-D: Self explanatory.

  • Block E: Identify the specific task relating to the mission or overall task to be performed.

  • Block F: Identify Hazards - Identify hazards by reviewing METT-TC factors for the mission or task.

  • Block G: Assess Hazards - Assessment includes historical lessons learned, intuitive analysis, experience, judgment, equipment characteristics and warnings, and environmental considerations. Determine the initial risk for each hazard by assessing the probability and severity.

  • Block H: Develop Controls - Develop one or more controls for each hazard that will either eliminate the hazard or reduce the risk of a hazardous incident. Specify who, what, where, why, when and how for each control.

  • Block I: Determine Residual Risk - Determine the residual risk for each hazarding by assessing the probability and severity.

  • Block K: Determine Overall Mission/Task Risk - Select the highest residual risk level and circle it. This becomes the overall mission or task risk level. The commander decides whether the controls are sufficient to accept the level of residual risk. If the risk is too great to continue the mission or task, the commander directs development of additional controls or modifies, changes, or rejects the COA.

  • Supervise and Evaluate - This step is not on the worksheet. Plan how each control will be monitored for implementation and reassess hazards as the situation changes. Determined if the controls worked and if they can be improved. Pass on lessons learned.

Figure K-10. Risk Management Worksheet

Figure K-10. Risk Management Worksheet



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