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Military

Chapter 27
OBJECTIVE MILITARY PERSONNEL
INFORMATION REQUIREMENTS

This chapter outlines the design requirements for a military personnel information management system that will adequately support the other critical personnel functions in a theater of operations. It consolidates and amplifies previously referenced objective system requirements for developers and field operators.

AUTOMATION

Personnel managers have a constant need for real-time personnel information to meet battlefield personnel management requirements. To meet this demand, the Army requires a single personnel information management system that satisfies the following requirements:

  • Provides distributed processing.
  • Uses an industry standard, state-of-the-art, multi-tasking operating system.
  • Has security capability that meets DoD standards without additional personnel. This includes when connected to other systems through communications nets.
  • Has interface capability with new and/or evolving systems.
  • Has resident software that completely meets the demands of personnel readiness, replacement operations, casualty operations, personnel accounting and strength reporting, postal operations, and personnel information management.
  • Provides the means to account for deployed Army civilians and reports their assignment and location through the automated reporting channels to the total Army personnel data base (TAPDB).
  • Provides the means to account for joint/combined task force and host nation personnel and report their assignment and location as either a system product or through/to external, compatible data base systems.

Within these functional areas, specific software applications must cover task force management, manifesting, patient accountability, postal routing, postal locator, postal redirect, soldier applications, word processing, spreadsheet, and graphics. The software must have the flexibility to provide for changes to new functional requirements within one year from proponent documentation to product fielding. End products must have a user-friendly, self-teaching capability.

The hardware must be man-portable. Central processing units must be state-of-the-art. Random access memory and fixed disk data storage capability must be sufficient to service all assigned soldiers' and civilians' records. Examples are a division's data base on one notebook computer and a local area network consisting of a file server with satellite microcomputers.

The communications system must have the following: ability to communicate at each command level and between levels from battalion to HQDA on a real-time basis, with multiple addressee capability; electronic signature capability; ability to read and write multiple data media; and ability to use commercially available hardware.

The system must have short training requirements during mobilization. This is 16 hours for operators, 40 hours for system managers, and 80 hours for programmers. Reserve Component units must have the system and train with it.

TASK FORCE MANAGEMENT

Task organization is the process of temporarily realigning organization structure, personnel, and command relationships for a specific purpose. The result is a task force. The task organization concept requires reestablishing the original command alignment within a relatively short period. The personnel information management system must have the flexibility necessary to support task organization.

The first requirement is for the personnel information management system to recognize interim command alignments within its organizational and authorization files. On the date the responsible commander orders a task force organization, the personnel information management system must immediately recognize the task force as a legitimate organizational entity with corresponding personnel authorizations.

The process of realigning units in this fashion must result in an instantaneous system update from any level. The personnel readiness manager is the focal point in this action. He will coordinate with the system manager to change organizational and authorization files to reflect the task organization. The task force commander assumes personnel responsibility for all soldiers and Army civilians assigned to the task force. The task force data base will contain automated records for assigned soldiers and Army civilians.

After task force deactivation, the personnel information management system must be able to quickly reconfigure the data base to reflect the changed organizational structure. The system must immediately transfer individual electronic personnel records to the original organizational structure or a new task organization. It must be done concurrently with task force deactivation. This process must be made simple to manage at all command levels.

The system will differentiate between the different command and control relationships and transfer either the entire record or only the elements required for command decision-making.

System designers must construct data elements to reflect organizational alignment with more than one command structure in the personnel information management system. This provides a task force record and facilitates configuring units in a new command alignment.

System design must reflect command alignments below unit identification code (UIC) level of detail. This provides for alignment with the appropriate task force. To task-organize below the UIC level of detail (for example, platoons and sections), the system must task-organize down to squad/crew/team level. It must be able to move authorizations and individual electronic personnel records at the same time.

The task force module in the personnel information management system must provide for information consolidation at each command level. It must also provide the capability to query the task force data base for any item of information on an individual soldier, Army civilian, team, or unit. This includes summary information on all task force units.

A requirement exists for a software module that will allow personnel readiness managers at all levels to record a unit's temporary alignment for exercise or planning purposes and provide personnel services to the soldier and Army civilian.

Software modules must allow personnel readiness managers to view task force personnel status. Examples of functional requirements are comparative strength information by task force, MOS inventories, and other routine personnel readiness management queries.

READINESS AND DEPLOYABILITY

An individually carried electronic medium must exist that can easily manipulate input/extract data from multiple data bases for soldier readiness processing and rapid deployability. Examples are the plastic card with bar code, magnetic strip, and memory chip.

This system must also account for individual replacement personnel as they move through the replacement system (for example, CONUS replacement center and replacement companies). The medium should be simple in design and limited to critical data elements to expedite development and simplify maintenance.

PATIENT ACCOUNTABILITY

The patient accounting software module must enable battalions/separate units to transfer accountability for soldiers and Army civilians admitted to medical facilities to a corps/TAACOM patient account. This will give personnel readiness managers more accurate information on unit personnel readiness.

The module must provide a centralized data base of current and historical data regarding all patients within the theater of operations by level (for example, corps and theater). The requirement includes personnel without a social security number (SSN) (for example, soldiers of allied forces and enemy prisoners of war).

The module must facilitate casualty reporting and enable casualty managers to record and manage casualty information on each case throughout the process. The module must also allow casualty managers to make multiple reports on an individual case and review previous reports along with current information.

The module requires horizontal and vertical integration. This provides for seamless data entry at any point within the casualty operations network and electronic transmittal to all appropriate data bases in the personnel information management network.

There must bean electronic interface with the medical community's medical management information systems and the casualty accounting system. The interfaces are the sources of data compiled in the patient accountability data base.

CASUALTY ACCOUNTING

The casualty accounting module must provide a current and historical data source for all casualties within the theater of operations. This must be by level (for example, company, battalion S1, brigade S1, division G1, personnel services battalion, personnel group, theater PERSCOM and USTA PERSCOM).

The module must facilitate seamless casualty reporting and allow casualty operations managers to manage casualty case status through the entire process. The module must make appropriate multiple reports on the same individual and allow the casualty manager to review casualty reports along with current information.

The module requires horizontal and vertical integration. This provides for data input at any point within the casualty operations network and electronic transmission to appropriate data bases. The module must have an electronic interface with the patient accounting system.

MAIL ROUTING MANAGEMENT

The mail routing management module must provide a centralized current and historical data source concerning Army post offices (APOs). It must give their locations and the contingency APOs of all units within the theater of operations or scheduled to deploy to it.

The module requires horizontal and vertical integration. This provides for data entry at any point within the postal operations network and electronic transmission to appropriate action agencies.

The module must interface with logistics systems to track and locate mail containers during shipment (to, from, and within the theater of operations). The module must be able to generate an automated mail routing scheme, upon request. The scheme must reflect unit locations and servicing APOs. The module must accept unit relocation information from either the supporting APOs or the corps/TAACOM personnel management centers (PMCs), whichever gains first knowledge.

POSTAL REDIRECT

The postal redirect module must provide a centralized source of current mailing addresses for soldiers and Army civilians. It must also be able to record past and projected addresses.

An electronic medium containing the soldier's and Army civilian's name and SSN should automatically update his address. After reading this information into the personnel information management system data base, address update should require only one or two key strokes. The software must be able to direct a printer to print labels with bar codes as an address update by-product. Postal unit printers must be able to print bar codes on labels.

The postal redirect module requires horizontal and vertical integration. This provides for data entry at any point within the postal operations network and electronic transmission to appropriate postal companies.

REPLACEMENT MANAGEMENT

The replacement management module must provide a centralized current and historical data source regarding replacement arrival and allocation at every personnel management-related stop. This data must track replacement flow to the ultimate unit of assignment.

The module must be able to provide total asset visibility and account for individual replacement status from the point USTA PERSCOM makes allocation to arrival in the ultimate unit of assignment. An electronic medium containing the soldier's and Army civilian's name and SSN should serve as the personnel information management system input device.

The module requires horizontal and vertical integration. This provides for data entry at any/every point within the replacement management network and electronic transmission to appropriate action agencies. The module must have electronic interface with the personnel readiness management process and the personnel information management data base.

COMMUNICATIONS

Real-time communications are essential for personnel information to be available in an online, interactive processing manner. This processing requires immediate communications links. Without these links, the system can only provide near real-time information.

Communications that handle personnel information must be able to immediately transfer large amounts of personnel data from the battalion S1 to USTA PERSCOM. It must do this without interfering with operational or logistical communications. These systems should be transparent to the user and constantly available. The user should be able to simultaneously update all appropriate data bases through standard multiple addresses.

Personnel communications systems must facilitate immediate set up. PMCs at battalion/separate unit level and higher must have communications from the theater of operations to the sustaining base within 24 hours after arrival. The requirement is for data transmission and voice communication. This may be through satellite or direct dial network.



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