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Military

Chapter 13
CORPS

This chapter describes the responsibilities and programs of the corps G1 and the adjutant general (AG). It also describes the mission, organization, and operational responsibilities of the corps personnel management center (PMC).

The information in this chapter applies to both corps and TAACOM. The TAACOM counterpart to the corps G1 is the assistant chief of staff for personnel. The AG and the resources required to operate the PMC are in the table of organization and equipment (TOE) of the supporting personnel group.

RESPONSIBILITIES

The two key personnel managers at corps level are the G1 and the AG/personnel group commander.

CORPS G1

The corps G1 has the following responsibilities:

  • Integrate all personnel support activities within the corps.
  • Establish general, corps-unique personnel policies.
  • Assist the corps commander to evaluate and influence the corps command climate.
  • Prepare the personnel estimate IAW FM 101-5 and unit SOPs.
  • Recommend replacement priorities of fill to the corps G3 and corps commander.
  • When designated as the lead G1, be prepared to act as a theater PERSCOM and coordinate personnel activities for the contingency theater.
  • Direct the MWR, alcohol and drug abuse prevention and control, equal opportunity (EO), and safety programs.
  • Prepare personnel service support (PSS) plans and orders to support the tactical plan and its branches and sequels, and to ensure corps and subordinate plans support the commander's desired end-state.

CORPS ADJUTANT GENERAL

The corps AG has the following responsibilities:

  • Direct the corps military and civilian personnel systems. Staff and unit functions that affect the personnel systems are shown in Figure 13-1.
  • Collect, summarize, and analyze information and assist the G1 in preparing personnel estimates, projecting replacement requirements, and recommending replacement priorities.
  • Manage services to soldiers and civilians, contractors, and joint or allied personnel, as required.
  • Direct support activities within the postal and replacement management systems.
  • Synchronize the corps personnel network, ensuring activities support the commander's desired end-state.

CORPS G1 PROGRAMS

The corps G1 directs the MWR, alcohol and drug abuse prevention and control, EO, and safety programs.

MORALE, WELFARE, AND RECREATION

The G1 MWR responsibilities include the critical corps tasks outlined in Chapter 7, MWR and community support.

ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PREVENTION AND CONTROL

Corps G1 responsibilities include the following critical tasks:

  • Establish corps-unique policy and procedures for program implementation.
  • Ensure that the program gets appropriate attention at corps and all subordinate command levels.
  • Collect, summarize, analyze, and report program information to the corps commander.

EQUAL OPPORTUNITY

Corps G1 responsibilities include the following critical tasks:

  • Establish corps-unique policy and procedures for program implementation.
  • Ensure the program is highly visible at corps and all subordinate command levels.
  • Collect, summarize, and report program information to the corps commander.

SAFETY

Corps G1 responsibilities include the following critical tasks:

  • Establish corps-unique policy and procedures for the program.
  • Collect, summarize, analyze, and report program information to the corps commander.
  • Collect accident reports and forward reportable accident information to the theater deputy chief of staff for personnel (DCSPER).
  • Publicize the safety program.

CORPS PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CENTER

The mission of the corps PMC is to sustain corps personnel readiness, direct corps-wide personnel systems, synchronize the efforts of the personnel network, manage general and direct support (GS/DS) postal and replacement activities, and ensure that commanders, soldiers, civilians, and joint or allied personnel receive essential personnel services. The PMC provides civilian personnel support through a support cell provided by DCSPER/PERSCOM.

The PMC is made up of the AG and the personnel operations division of the personnel group.

The PMC organization is shown at Figure 13-2.

PERSONNEL OPERATIONS DIVISION

The personnel operations division has three branches: personnel readiness management, staff actions, and personnel automation. These branches manage critical personnel systems at corps level.

The chief of the personnel operations division is dual-hatted, functioning as the deputy corps AG and directing the corps PMC in the absence of the corps AG.

PERSONNEL READINESS MANAGEMENT BRANCH

The personnel readiness management branch performs the specific critical tasks essential for operating the following personnel systems: personnel readiness, personnel accounting/strength reporting, and replacement management. This branch is responsible for the critical corps tasks outlined in Chapter 1, Personnel Readiness Management, Chapter 2, Personnel Accounting and Strength Reporting, and Chapter 4, Replacement Management.

STAFF ACTIONS BRANCH

The staff actions branch ensures that commanders, soldiers, and civilians receive essential personnel services as described in Chapter 8, Essential Personnel Services and Chapter 9, Personnel Support to Civilians. The branch performs the specific critical tasks essential for managing the following personnel systems: casualty management and postal operations management.

Responsibilities of this branch include the critical corps tasks outlined in Chapter 3, Casualty Operations Management, and Chapter 6, Postal Operations Management.

PERSONNEL AUTOMATION BRANCH

The personnel automation branch performs the critical task of personnel information management, including corps data base management.

Responsibilities of this branch include the critical corps tasks outlined in Chapter 2, Personnel Accounting and Strength Reporting and Chapter 5, Personnel Information Management.

EMPLOYMENT

The corps PMC normally deploys prior to the command and control elements of the personnel group to maintain personnel readiness. Elements of the PMC may deploy to support division/task force early entry/assault echelons and assist establishment of critical personnel systems in the theater of operations. Additional resources may deploy in incremental packages as the theater develops.

The corps PMC normally functions as an element of the corps rear command post (CP). The G1 may operate from either the main or rear CP. The personnel group commander/AG normally deploys a small cell to the corps main CP. Elements of the G1 and personnel group may also remain at the sustaining base to provide continuity for personnel functions, communication/coordination with USTA PERSCOM, and liaison to family support activities.

COMMUNICATIONS

The corps PMC uses the corps communications network to transmit critical personnel information to higher, lateral, and lower organizations in the theater. This network consists of secure and unsecure voice, telecommunications, digital data or facsimile, and courier.

Digital transmission using mobile subscriber equipment and/or satellite communications is the primary means of data transmission to the sustaining base, USTA PERSCOM, and within the theater. If it is not available, facsimile transceiver, teletype, and data disk by courier are backup systems. Using data-disk courier as a backup system seriously degrades information timeliness and its usefulness to the command.

The personnel group does not own or control all components of this communications net; therefore, close coordination between the personnel group and signal brigade is essential to real-time, assured communications.



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