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Chapter 6

Contingency Communications Package and the Light Contingency Communications Package

The CCP and the light CCP (LCCP) improves the operational capability and flexibility of the MSE network to support contingency missions. Airborne, air assault, light forces, and early entry TMD assets conduct these missions. The CCP and LCCP have the capabilities and functions of several standard MSE shelters. The CCP can deploy by air, land, or sea. The LCCP deploys with its supported force into the operational area by air transport. This chapter covers the battalion structure, equipment capabilities, and deployment of the CCP and the LCCP.

DOCTRINAL IMPACTS

 

6-1. Standard MSE configurations exceed air-sortie allocations, and area communications requirements exceed single-channel radio capabilities. Therefore, the CCP and the LCCP can support airborne, air assault, light forces, and early entry TMD assets in entry operations. The CCP and LCCP can deploy to operational areas as predesigned support packages in up to two C-141 sorties or C-130 equivalents. The CCP and LCCP provide connectivity to the sustaining base from the entry position via multichannel TACSAT within one-half hour of deployment. The CCP and LCCP also allow interconnectivity to a second CCP or LCCP at a different entry position using LOS links if possible and satellite if not.

6-2. Each CCP or LCCP can support a task force CP/airfield and maneuver brigade headquarters to include the brigade main and jump CPs. At the task force CP/airfield, signal support provides parent switching with static and mobile subscriber access and NRI. Additional signal support provides multichannel TACSAT connectivity to the sustaining base or other task force CPs. At the brigade headquarters, signal support provides extension switching, mobile subscriber access, and NRI and LOS connectivity.

   

DIVISION SIGNAL BATTALION STRUCTURE

 

6-3. Under the CCP or LCCP concept, the division signal battalion is reconfigured as follows:

6-4. The HHC and A Company retain their standard MSE table(s) of organization and equipment (TOE).

6-5. B Company, Contingency Area Communications Company, consists of a headquarters platoon, one standard nodal platoon, and one contingency nodal platoon (one CCP). The CCP consists of one contingency communications parent switch (CCPS) and two contingency communications extension switches (CCESs) called FESs.

6-6. C Company, Signal Support Company (MSE), Airborne/Air Assault, consists of a headquarters platoon, one standard nodal platoon, one multichannel TACSAT platoon, and four FM retransmission teams normally associated with the Light Forces Signal Support Company (MSE).

6-7. The reconfigured MSE CCP and LCCP replace existing MSE assemblages within the division signal battalion.

6-8. The CCP in the airborne division replaces-

  • One LENS.
  • One NCS.
  • Four SENSs.
  • Three RAUs.
  • Six LOS(V1)s.
  • Four LOS(V3)s.
  • One LOS(V4).

6-9. The LCCP in the light division replaces

  • One LENS.
  • One NMF.
  • One LEN support vehicle.
  • One RAU.
  • One LOS(V1).
  • One LOS(V4).

6-10. Basis of allocation for the CCP is four CCPs to the XVIII Airborne Corps (35th Signal Brigade) and two CCPs each to the 82d Airborne Division (82d Signal Battalion) and the 101st Air Assault Division (501st Signal Battalion). The CCP consists of-

  • One CCPS (communications central (with LTU), AN/TTC-50).
  • Two CCESs (communications central (without LTU), AN/TTC-50).
  • One dismounted extension switch (DES) (communications switching set, AN/TTC-51).
  • Two AN/TRC-198(V1)s (similar to an LOS(V3)).
  • Two dismounted LOS (DLOS) AN/TRC-198(V2)s.

6-11. Basis of allocation for the LCCP is two LCCPs each to the selected light infantry division signal battalions (10th and 125th). The LCCP consists of-

  • One parent switch (communications central, AN/TTC-50).
  • Two DESs (communications switching set, AN/TTC-51).
  • Two LOS AN/TRC-198(V1)s.
  • Four DLOS AN/TRC-198(V2)s.
   

EQUIPMENT CAPABILITIES

 

6-12. The CCPs can support local switching, tandem trunking, flood search routing, and database maintenance for extension switches and RAUs.

6-13. At the task force CP/airfield, the CCP can support 12 local RAU subscribers, 117 local wire subscribers, 8 defense switching networks (DSNs) or 8 commercial access trunks, and 7 packet switch hosts.

6-14. At the brigade headquarters, the CCP can support 15 local RAU subscribers, 47 local wire subscribers, 8 DSNs or 8 commercial access trunks, and 7 packet switch hosts.

6-15. The CCP and LCCP are fully interoperable with other MSE systems. Two C-141B aircraft sorties can transport each CCP or LCCP.

   

DEPLOYMENT

  6-16. The following paragraphs cover CCP and LCCP deployment
   
CCP INITIAL DEPLOYMENT
  6-17. As the CCP initially deploys, connectivity is maintained to the sustaining base, to an adjacent CP/airfield if present, and to a brigade headquarters. Connectivity to the sustaining base is maintained through multichannel TACSAT. Connectivity to the adjacent CP/airfield is maintained through LOS multichannel or through multichannel TACSAT. As the brigade headquarters deploys, connectivity is maintained through the DLOS. (See Figure 6-1.)

 

Figure 6-1. CCP Initial Deployment

CCP FULL DEPLOYMENT
  6-18. As the network matures, the CCP supports the deployed brigade headquarters and a jump brigade headquarters and maintains connectivity to an adjacent CP/airfield and to the sustaining base. Connectivity to the adjacent airfield is supported by another CCP and maintained through LOS if possible. Connectivity to the sustaining base is maintained through multichannel TACSAT. (See Figure 6-2.)

 

Figure 6-2. CCP Full Deployment

CCP CONVENTIONAL MISSION
  6-19. In a conventional entry operations mission, the MSE CCP maintains connectivity to two NCs and two brigade headquarters. Connectivity is maintained using LOS multichannel communications. (See Figure 6-3.)

 

Figure 6-3. CCP Conventional Mission

LCCP INITIAL DEPLOYMENT
  6-20. As the LCCP initially deploys, connectivity is maintained to the sustaining base, to an adjacent CP/airfield if present, and to a brigade headquarters. Connectivity to the sustaining base is maintained through multichannel TACSAT. Connectivity to the adjacent CP/airfield is supported by another CCP and maintained through LOS multichannel or through multichannel TACSAT. As the brigade headquarters deploys, connectivity is maintained through the DLOS to the DES. LOS is also used to maintain connectivity to a RAU at the brigade headquarters. (See Figure 6-4.)

 

Figure 6-4. LCCP Initial Deployment

LCCP FULL DEPLOYMENT
  6-21. As the network matures, the CCPS supports two deployed brigade headquarters and two RAUs, located at the brigade headquarters, and maintains connectivity to an adjacent CP/airfield and to the sustaining base. Connectivity to the adjacent airfield is supported by another CP and maintained through LOS if possible. Connectivity to the sustaining base is maintained through multichannel TACSAT. Connectivity to the brigade headquarters is maintained through LOS terminals at the CP/airfield and through the DES at the brigade headquarters. (See Figure 6-5.)

Figure 6-5. LCCP Full Deployment

LCCP CONVENTIONAL MISSION
  6-22. In a conventional MSE mission, the CCP maintains connectivity to two NCs and two brigade headquarters. Connectivity is maintained using LOS multichannel communications. (See Figure 6-6.)

Figure 6-6. LCCP Conventional Mission

 



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