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Chapter 5

Network Database Management

This chapter describes database development and provides doctrinal guidance to accomplish those tasks. The discussion includes developing and managing an MSE database using the NPT. The NPT and the SCC-2 are used as the network status controller including the NMC for the TPN operation and management.

MANAGEMENT CONTROL

 

5-1. The NPT, SCC-2, NCS, LENS, and their NMFs operate from a standardized network database. The critical part of long-range planning is initially generating the network database. The corps or the division G6, if establishing a stand-alone division network, sets up network management and control parameters for this process.

5-2. The signal brigade headquarters conducts management and control in an MSE corps network. The division signal battalion headquarters conducts management and control in a stand-alone division MSE network. Within these headquarters, the SYSCON conducts MSE network planning and operation. SYSCON maintains TECHCON of the network and is responsible for-

  • Planning, engineering, controlling, and maintaining the network.
  • Assigning and reassigning variable network operating parameters.
  • Distributing all operating parameters network wide.
  • Establishing relationships among network components.

DATABASE DEVELOPMENT

 

5-3. For signal planners, the supported unit's mission and planning guidance determine the content of the database. Signal planners may prepare one master database from which all missions evolve or prepare individual mission databases to support specific contingencies. The number of databases depends on the differences in force structure, missions, and geographical AO.

5-4. In operation plans (OPLANs), the force commander and staff define each mission, contingency, and exercise. The force signal staff prepares the databases and obtains the following information:

  • Active and reserve component forces that require support.
  • Radios to be used.
  • Available MSE assets and unit information.
  • Desired link reliabilities.
  • Environmental parameters.
  • Desired network-planning factors.
  • Subscriber terminals to include-
    • Level of authorized precedence.
    • Type of authorized subscriber terminal and designation of tactical unit where each terminal will deploy.
    • Type of service required by each user/office (for example, progressive conference and commercial network access).
    • Preprogrammed conference participants.
    • Compressed dial participants.
  • Expected joint and allied interface requirements, including units and specific mission requirements.
  • Expected geographical AOs.
  • Authorized and restricted frequencies by range and type.
  • Known competing, civilian emitters that could be in the AO, including grid locations, operating frequencies, and transmit power.
  • Potential EW emitters.

5-5. This information is then used to respond to one or more of the following areas.

  • Digitized maps.
  • High point data.
  • PALs.
  • Profile lists (including compressed dial lists).
  • Preprogrammed conference lists (PCLs).
  • Team files.
  • MSE frequency management.

5-6. The MSE database includes the global database (GDB), and it-

  • Supports a seamless network architecture.
  • Provides joint and service interoperability at EAC and ECB.
  • Provides an effective communications network for any force projection scenario.

5-7. The GDB identifies joint (Commander-in-Chief (CINC)) level, US Army, US Air Force, US Navy, and US Marine organizations. The GDB manager (GDB MGR) is located with the US Army Signal Center. The GDB includes-

  • Nonduplicated PAL sublist numbers.
  • Nonduplicated team label identification for switch and control systems.
  • Nonduplicated phone numbers.
  • Global Standard Profile Matrix (GSPM) 255.

5-8. The NPT can develop the MSE network database, plan and engineer the network, and distribute team information to all appropriate switches. The SCC-2 acts as network status controller, and the NMC within the SCC-2 manages the operation of the TPN after it is initialized and loaded with the database.

DIGITIZED MAP REQUIREMENTS

 

5-9. The MSE NPT uses two types of map data for its software applications. Both are originally sourced from the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) and are available on compact disk-read only memory (CD-ROM).

5-10. The ARC-Digitized Raster Graphics (ADRG) is a digitized picture of paper maps that clearly shows the terrain features (for example, rivers, roads, lakes, hills). They are available in five forms.

  • Joint Operations Graphics-Air (JOG-A), 1:250,000.
  • Joint Operations Graphics-Ground (JOG-G), 1:250,000.
  • Topographic Line Maps (TLM), 1:50,000.
  • Tactical Pilotage Charts (TPC), 1:50,000.
  • Operational Navigation Charts (ONC), 1: 1,000,000.

5-11. The digitized terrain elevation data (DTED), Level 1, provides the terrain data applied to the digitized map for use in site location and radio system profiling.

HIGH POINT DATA REQUIREMENTS

 

5-12. High points are developed using the high elevation retrieval option within the network planning-frequency assignment application of the NPT. A user-selected rectangular area, defined by coordinates of its southwest and northeast corners, can be established using appropriate map data. This rectangular area map plot can be divided into five rows of five columns (equaling 25 cells) with up to five high points per cell, so that selected high points may be chosen throughout the original map plot. When selecting high points, a minimum separation value is applied to prevent all high points from being on the same high piece of terrain (for example, single hilltop). With this capability, the NPT can make a map reconnaissance of potential site locations before making the physical reconnaissance.

5-13. Two other NPT software applications support high point refinement. The interactive asset placement (IAP) application searches for high elevation placement for particular radio links at a site that still profiles. The automatic asset placement (AAP) application checks for the centroid of mass of switches that an NC supports and identifies the highest ground within a 1-kilometer area of a selected site.

5-14. Signal planners must consider all METT-T factors when selecting potential high points. The final high point selection is coordinated with senior headquarters SYSCON and the G3. Other weapons and communication systems can have high points as key terrain.

PREAFFILIATION LIST REQUIREMENTS

 

5-15. The MSE database includes telephone numbers for fielded units contained on the switch PAL. This database contains a unique telephone number for each subscriber position. The database is updated annually according to actual subscriber requirements that allocate a specific type of terminal to each operational subscriber.

5-16. The PAL sublists identify subscribers' numbers and the associated profile service characteristics likely to be affiliated with the network. The signal organization planner, through the US Army Signal Center GDB MGR, manages the development of the PAL. A PAL database can have up to 1,000 PAL sublists (database designators DB000-DB999). Each PAL sublist can contain a maximum of 200 subscribers. Each sublist is developed according to the standard requirements code (SRC) assigned to each unit or entity within a PAL database. The sublist may include command structure or community of interest, such as division main (DMAIN), division tactical command post (DTAC), or division rear (DREAR). PAL sublists are a part of the global PAL (GLPAL) baseline that includes all joint and US military services.

5-17. The doctrinal guidelines for developing a PAL database are shown below.

5-18. Assign unit or telephone prefixes (first part of the phone number) according to the Global Block Numbering Plan (GBNP) approved in June 1995, and subsequently changed or defined by the GDB MGR.

5-19. Assign telephone numbers by using the prefix from the unitlist.dbf and associating a suffix from the suffix.dbf based on the SRC or subscriber template. The subscriber database is created from association and reviewed by the network manager or PAL manager of the specific PAL database. Units should use the subscriber database to develop telephone directories to meet their requirements.

5-20. Ensure a subscriber's telephone number is unique with a profile assigned and placed only on one sublist.

5-21. Develop PAL sublists along task organized lines, depending on requirements. A subscriber's DNVT and MSRT number may appear on different PAL sublists. This depends on the way the network deploys and supports the units.

5-22. Group GLPAL sublists for corps into DB000-DB999 signal technical numbers as shown in Table 5-1.

5-23. Group GLPAL sublists for all other databases into DB000-DB099 signal technical numbers as shown in Table 5-2.

Table 5-1. Corps GLPAL Sublists

Database Designators

Community of Interest

DB000



DB001-DB009
DB010-DB019
DB020-DB029
DB030-DB039

DB040-DB049
DB050-DB059
DB060-DB069
DB070-DB079
DB080-DB089
DB090-DB094
DB095-DB099
Area Brigade DBA00
Corps Signal Brigade SCC-2/ ISYSCON

Area Battalion DBA01 Corps
Area Battalion DBA02 Corps
Area Battalion DBA03 Corps
Area Battalion DBA04 Corps (Support)
Division DBD01
Division DBD02
Division DBD03
Division DBD04
Division DBD05
Division DBD06
Division DBD07

Table 5-2. GLPAL Sublists for Other Databases

Database Designators

Community of Interest

DB000


DB001-DB009
DB010-DB019
DB020-DB029
DB030-DB039
DB040-DB049
DB050-DB059
DB060-DB069
DB070-DB079
DB080-DB089
DB090-DB094
DB095-DB099
DB100-DB999

Area Brigade DBA00
Command or Brigade ISYSCON
Area Battalion DBA01
Area Battalion DBA02
Area Battalion DBA03
Area Battalion DBA04
Area Battalion DBA05
Area Battalion DBA06
Area Battalion DBA07
Area Battalion DBA08
Area Battalion DBA09
Area Battalion DBA10
Area Battalion DBA11
As Required

 

5-24. Table 5-3 shows an example of the switch PAL.

Table 5-3. Switch PAL

Switch PAL Example
PA520597 contains 9 PALs
PAL Number 52001
I_CTSC 29 SC BN NCS 5201
9 entries:
5200100
5200101
5200102
5200103
5200104
5200105
5200106
5200110
5200111

184
190
190
190
190
190
190
190
190

 

5-25. Do not include data terminal adapter (DTA) numbers in switches on PAL sublists or subscriber databases. The network uses these numbers to communicate between switches. They follow the format of DB99907 (999 is number 000-099 and 07 is standard for all flood search switches).

5-26. Group all signal battalion MSRT numbers on one PAL. This allows the signal numbers needed for network control to activate in the first operational NCS and ensures that signal managers have immediate access to the evolving network. Other MSRT subscribers may use a similar rule, so they may have phone service as soon as they enter the area.

5-27. The NPT can accept a PAL load disk with its PBOOKII software application. Do not use PBOOKII software when modifying and updating a PAL. The PBOOKII software application provides an electronic phone book to support tactical switching. It also supports the 63 and 255 profile matrix standards with version 2.01 and the GDB with version 2.02.

PROFILE LIST REQUIREMENTS

 

5-28. Profiles provide particular phone service and system features to wire and mobile subscribers. The subscriber's profile defines the level of authorized service to each MSE subscriber. A method of developing profiles is to classify the subscribers by type and/or position. Each subscriber is assigned a permanent profile. This profile can be changed temporarily at the switch; however, this is the exception not the rule. Signal planners must consider area TMD communications support requirements, whereas TMD assets require dial-hold (channel reassignment function) circuits through the MSE network.

5-29. The US Army uses the GSPM 255 0895 matrix, which replaces the earlier Army Standard Profile Matrix 0191. The GSPM 255 0895 matrix-

  • Increases profiles from 63 to 255.
  • Provides additional profiles to meet evolving subscriber service requirements.
  • Includes profiles for joint communications networks.
  • Provides direct conversion from the 63 to the 255 matrix.
  • Addresses the COMSEC rekey rule "250" limitation.
  • Provides 19 subscriber features.

5-30. Six basic groups within the matrix are

  • 0 - Wireline subscribers (terminal type-3) DSVT.
  • 1 - Mobile subscribers (terminal type-3) MSRT.
  • 2 - DNVT subscribers (terminal type-13) DNVT.
  • 3 - DTA (terminal type-15).
  • 4 - GLU (terminal type-16).
  • 5 - Analog/secure terminal unit (STU) (terminal type-248).

5-31. There are 50 subgroups which are categorized by profile and precedence order. The COMSEC rekey rule states that a maximum of 250 mobile subscribers should be assigned on a single rekey ID within a network. All wireline subscribers are assigned to one rekey ID-01. Fourteen mobile groups with unique rekey IDs will assist in preserving the COMSEC limit of 250.

5-32. The GSPM contains the old profile numbers cross-referenced to the GSPM profile. The US Army Signal Center initially converts all databases to the GSPM profiles. Each signal organization network manager may review each subscriber to determine if the new profile meets the subscriber's requirements. Each group for DSVTs converts to 03, 04, and 06, which translates to 009, 010, and 015, respectively. MSRTs may convert directly to MSRT groups 1-7 from old groups 1-7, or MSRT groups 1-7 for division slots and MSRT groups 8-14 for corps troops. EAC and other databases may only use MSRT groups 1-7.

5-33. Figure 5-1 shows the GSPM. The network manager must complete the profile matrix to initiate the MSE network.

 

Figure 5-1. GSPM

 

Figure 5-1. GSPM (Continued)

 

Figure 5-1. GSPM (Continued)

 

Figure 5-1. GSPM (Continued)

 

Figure 5-1. GSPM (Continued)

 

Figure 5-1. GSPM (Continued)

 

Figure 5-1. GSPM (Continued)

 

Figure 5-1. GSPM (Continued)

 

Figure 5-1. GSPM (Continued)

  5-34. Profile 238 is used for the RAUs GLU and 237 is used for the DTAs. The other 253 profiles for subscriber equipment contain all five levels of precedence for operation and control purposes. Table 5-4 shows the percentage of precedence category calls a network will contain.

Table 5-4. Percentage of Precedence Category Calls

Percentage

Precedence

0.0%
0.2%
4.0%
27.8%
68.0%

Flash Override (FO)
Flash (F)
Immediate (I)
Priority (P)
Routine (R)

Note: Source is Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff Memorandum (CJCSM) Publication 6231.07A series.
  5-35. Table 5-5 shows the class marks, which make up a subscriber's profile and the input codes associated with each class mark.

Table 5-5. Class Mark Input Codes

CLASS MARK

 

VALID INPUTS

 

INPUT CODES

Terminal Type

 

DSVT
DNVT
DTA
SCC-2
LG-1
ANALOG

 

3
13
15
84
16
251

Traffic Load Control

 

Most Essential
More Essential
Essential
Less Essential
Least Essential
Not Applicable

 

1
2
3
4
5
N/A

Security Level

 

Security Required
Security Preferred
End-To-End

 

R
P
E

Maximum
Precedence

 

Flash Override
Flash
Immediate
Priority
Routine

 

FO
F
I
P
R

Terminal
Characteristics

 

Voice
Multimode
Data

 

V
M
D

Message Switch
Compatible

 

Yes
No
Not Applicable

 

Y
N
N/A

NRI

 

Yes
No

 

Y
N

Progressive
Conference

 

Yes
No

 

Y
N

Call Forwarding

 

Yes
No

 

Y
N

Commercial Network
Access

 

Yes
No

 

Y
N

Essential User

 

Yes
No

 

Y
N

Table 5-5. Class Mark Input Codes (Continued)

CLASS MARK

 

VALID INPUTS

 

INPUT CODES

Compressed Dialing
List

 

Not Authorized
CD list 1
CD list 2
CD list 3
CD list 4
CD list 5

 

0
1
2
3
4
5

Zone Restriction

 

No Restriction
ZR list 1
ZR list 2
ZR list 3
ZR list 4
ZR list 5
ZR list 6
ZR list 7
ZR list 8

 

0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

Direct Access

 

Yes
No

 

Y
N

Rekey



 



1
-
-
-
25

 




1
-
-
-
25

Net ID A



 




2
-
-
-
26

 




2
-
-
-
26

Net ID B

 

27
-
-
51

 

27
-
-
51

Bar Trunk Access

 

Yes
No

 

Y
N

Bar Call

 

Yes
No

 

Y
N

 

5-36. The different subscriber terminal types within MSE can include-

  • Terminal type 3 (DSVT) - identifies the KY-68 or KY-90.
  • Terminal type 13 (DNVT) - a TA-1035/U or a TA-1042 with a data port to provide for data input.
 

Note: DNVTs or MSRTs must connect to a switch and have an individual directory number.

 

  • Terminal type 15 (DTA) - allows data to flow to and from the SCC-2.
  • Terminal type 248 - an analog circuit.
  • Terminal type 16 (GLU) - enables it to receive and distribute frequency plans and manage the eight radios in the RAU.
  • Terminal type 84 (SCC-2 network interface device) - provides the four transmit and four receive lines to the network.

5-37. TLC reduces network traffic during busy periods by efficiently using available switching and transmission resources. TLC restricts trunk access and local calling to class marked subscribers. Subscribers should be class marked for one of the five TLC levels shown in Table 5-38. The switch's TLC restrictions rule how the subscriber's TLC class mark is used in the MSE system. Table 5-6 explains how the switch uses class marks.

Table 5-6. TLC Application

Note: A local- or long-loop subscriber or private branch exchange (PBX) trunk attempting a trunk call is returned a line-busy tone. The call is not completed. Time-out actions on sending a line-busy tone is IAW the specific requirements of the particular loop or trunk. (See individual signaling and supervision appendices for details.) A digital in-band trunk signaling (DIBTS) trunk attempting a call is returned a call incomplete (all trunks busy from tandem switch).

 

5-38. The three security level class marks are security required (R), security preferred (P), and end-to-end (E). In profile development, only preferred and end-to-end are used.

5-39. Security required is used when a subscriber can only complete calls over secure links to approved loops or to a DSVT.

5-40. Security preferred are calls extended as secure, if possible; otherwise, the call is completed in a nonsecure mode. Most terminals are class marked as security preferred. Security preferred is for access to commercial networks and to the DISN.

5-41. End-to-end applies only to DSVTs. DSVT subscribers can only call other DSVT subscribers.

5-42. All five precedence levels can be assigned. The maximum precedence entry specifies the highest precedence level a subscriber may impose on a call. The national command authority (NCA) and/or the theater commander authorize assigning a particular precedence to a user.

5-43. The terminal characteristics entry specifies subscriber terminal characteristics. The three different terminal characteristics are voice (V), multimode (M), and data (D). NCTs and ABCS computer terminals, such as the MCS terminal, using the DSVT are class marked as data if the DSVT is used with MCS only; otherwise, it is class marked "M" for voice and data. Terminals without communication terminals (CTs) and with facsimile are class marked voice only.

5-44. The MS compatible entry specifies whether a subscriber in the data mode is compatible with the AN/TYC-39 (yes [Y] or no [N], and has access privilege for record traffic users with the CT (AN/UGC-144).

5-45. The NRI entry is only for the KY-90, and all subscribers have access by dialing the KY-90 phone numbers. The NRI is given a precedence to support contingencies.

5-46. The progressive conference entry specifies whether the subscriber is authorized to initiate a progressive conference (Y or N). With this authority, the subscriber may dial the selected subscribers for his conference. A conference call can have a maximum of 14 subscribers. The PCL must be loaded in the switches with subscribers needing this service.

5-47. The call forwarding entry specifies whether the subscriber can forward incoming calls to another terminal (Y or N). Do not confuse call forwarding with call transfer. Call transfer is transferring a connected call to another number and is not an MSE capability.

5-48. The commercial network access entry specifies whether the subscriber is authorized to initiate calls to commercial networks (Y or N).

5-49. The EUB class mark specifies essential users terminated at an NCS or LENS for bypass to another NCS if the subscriber's parent NCS cannot provide call processing because of processor failure (Y or N).

5-50. Compressed dialing lists (CDLs) allow selected subscribers to quickly dial frequently called people. The compressed dialing entry specifies whether the subscriber is authorized to use the compressed dialing feature. A zero shows that the subscriber cannot use compressed dialing. A digit (1-5) indicates that the subscriber can call anyone on the same CDL. There are five compressed dialing lists each containing up to 80 subscribers. Each entry is assigned a number between 20 and 99, which then becomes the compressed dialing number. Figure 5-2 shows a CDL.

5-51. Zone restriction lists (ZRLs) may be permissive or restrictive. ZRLs either allow a subscriber access to anywhere in the network or restrict access to certain areas. The restrictive list is for routine users only and limits them to calls within the corps network. Changes to this list are made at the NPT and sent by technical message to the NCS/LENS.

5-52. MSE wire subscribers may be class marked for direct access service (DAS). An NCS or LENS can have up to 60 assigned subscribers, and a SENS can have up to 10 subscribers. DAS can be assigned as a paired operation, where subscriber A can only call subscriber B and vice versa. DAS can also be assigned as a one-way operation, where subscriber A can only call subscriber B, but subscriber B can call any MSE subscriber. One-way operation is mainly used; it can also be used as the initiator of a preprogrammed conference. When a DAS subscriber initially connects to a switch, he must contact the switch operator and provide the directory number to which he desires direct access. Once the operator programs the switchboard, service is automatically provided. When the subscriber no longer requires DAS, he must contact the switch operator to disconnect this service.

5-53. The rekey ID 1 entry is valid with wireline DSVT-like devices only. Rekey IDs 2-23 are used for MSRTs only. Rekey IDs 24 and 25 are not assigned in the GSPM 255. Each ID (1-25) identifies the rekey variable of a DSVT-like net (recommended maximum of 90 terminals).

  • Net IDs A and B are not used.
  • Bar truck access and bar call were added with the GSPM 255.
  • The network manager must use the GSPM 255 to assign profiles to subscribers.

 

Note: The NPT using the PBOOKII software application supports both the 63 and the 255 profile matrix. The subscriber list management (SLM) application of the NPT can manage the subscriber database, including the PAL, CDL, and ZRL.

Figure 5-2. CDL

PREPROGRAMMED CONFERENCE LIST REQUIREMENTS

 

5-54. Authorized PCL members can initiate a conference call with members of the PCL list (Figure 5-3). There can be a total of 20 PCLs numbered from 20 to 39, and each list can contain up to 14 subscribers. It is also possible to have four PCLs with a maximum of five subscribers each if there are enough bridge terminal cards in service at the switch. At the top of each list, YES or NO is circled to indicate whether security is required for the conference list. A YES entry requires a loop key generator (LKG) per instrument per call. Each DSVT/MSRT (whether security is circled YES or NO) requires an LKG per instrument per call. Therefore, the standard for programmed conferences should be DNVT telephone numbers and a security NO entry. Multiple conferences outside the standard will degrade service at the NCS.

Figure 5-3. PCL

 

5-55. There are 20 corps common PCLs numbered 20 through 39. Only coordination with and aproval of the corps signal office can change these PCLs. Any temporary change for a particular exercise does not require a change to the tactical standing operating procedure (TSOP), but it does require a change to the tactical standing operating procedure (TSOP) but it does require updating a work sheet for that period. Table 5-7 shows an example of the corps PCL assignment.

Table 5-7. Example of the Corps PCL Assignment

Preprogrammed Conference List

Used For

20
21

Corps Command

22
23

Corps Administrative/
Logistics

24
25

Corps Operations

26
27

Corps Support Command
(COSCOM)

28
29

Corps Reserved

30

1st Division

32
33

2d Division

34
35

3d Division

36
37

4th Division

38
39

5th Division

TEAM LABEL DATA FILE REQUIREMENTS

 

5-56. The US Army Signal Center enters team label data into the team label data file (TLDF). The signal organization network manager or PAL manager for that database validates the TLDF. All teams are included in the TLDF. All MSE signal teams are assigned team labels according to the global team labeling scheme (Figure 5-4.) Table 5-8 shows the resulting corps standard team designation chart, which is used for team C2. Table 5-9 shows an example of the 1st Division's team labels.

Figure 5-4. Global Team Labeling Scheme

Table 5-8. Corps Global Standard Team Designation Chart

CORPS AREA SIGNAL BN TEAM LABELS AND SLOTS DIVISION SIGNAL BN TEAM LABELS AND SLOTS

DB01-DB09 DBA01
DB10-DB19 DBA02
DB20-DB29 DBA03
DB30-DB39 DBA04

DB40-DB49       DBD01
DB50-DB59       DBD02
DB60-DB69       DBD03
DB70-DB79       DBD04
DB80-DB89       DBD05
DB90-DB94       DBD06
DB95-DB99       DBD07

Note: SENs are designated with a letter team designator (A-K).

AREA BN SLOTS:

DBA01-DBA69  SEN(V1)
DBA01
DBA70-DBA99  SEN(V2)
DBB01-DBB69  SEN(V1)
DBA02
DBB70-DBB99  SEN(V2)
DBC01-DBC69  SEN(V1)
DBA02
DBC70-DBC99  SEN(V2)
DBD01-DBD69  SEN(V1)
DBA04
DBD70-DBD99  SEN(V2)

DIVISION BN SLOTS:

DBE01-DBE69  SEN(V1)  DBD01
DBE70-DBE99  SEN(V2)
DBF01-DBF69  SEN(V1)  DBD02
DBF70-DBF99  SEN(V2)
DBG01-DBG69 SEN(V1)  DBD03
DBG70-DBG99 SEN(V2)
DBH01-DBH99 SEN(V1)  DBD04
DBH70-DBH99 SEN(V2)
DBI01-DBI69  SEN(V1)  DBD05
DBI70-DBI99  SEN(V2)
DBJ01-DBJ69  SEN(V1)  DBD06
DBJ70-DBJ99  SEN(V2)
DBK01-DBK69 SEN(V1)  DBD07
DBK70-DBK99 SEN(V2)

Note: The LEN section is combined with the NCS section.

Note: Remote radio access units (RRAUs) are designated with an R-Team designator, and local radio access units (LRAUs) are designated with a U-Team designator.

RRAU:

DBR01-DBR09   DBA01
DBR10-DBR19   DBA02
DBR20-DBR29   DBA03
DBR30-DBR39   DBA04
 
 

LRAU:
DBU01-DBU09   DBA01
DBU10-DBU19   DBA02
DBU20-DBU29   DBA03
DBU30-DBU39   DBA04
RRAU:

DBR40-DBR49   DBD01
DBR50-DBR59   DBD02
DBR60-DBR69   DBD03
DBR70-DBR79   DBD04
DBR80-DBR89   DBD05
DBR90-DBR94   DBD06
DBR95-DBR99   DBD07

LRAU:
DBU40-DBU49   DBD01
DBU50-DBU59   DBD02
DBU60-DBU69   DBD03
DBU70-DBU79   DBD04
DBU80-DBU89   DBD05
DBU90-DBU94   DBD06
DBU95-DBU99   DBD07

Note: Refer to the global team labeling scheme for details on the team labels for local LOSs. Both are designated with 0-9, Z-Team designators.

Note: NATO interface teams, LOS(V2)s with NAI are designated with N-Team designators DBN01-DBN99.

Note: Network management systems (SCC-2/ISYSCON, CSCE) are designated with a W-Team designator.

Table 5-9. Example of the 1st Division's Team Labels

Team Name

Team Label

Team Label

NCS
SEN(V1)
SEN(V1)
SEN(V1)
SEN(V2)
RRAU
LRAU
TST (TACSAT)
TRT (TROPO)
LOS (LOS1-LOS8)

  DB40
  DB41
  DBE11
  DBE21
  DBE12
  DBE22
  DBE13
  DBE23
  DBE71
  DBE72
  DBR40
  DBR41
  DBU40
  DBU41
  DBS41
  DBS43
  DBX41
  DBX43
  DB441
  DB443

  DB42
  DB43
  DBE31
  DBE41
  DBE32
  DBE42
  DBE33
  DBE43
  DBE73
  DBE74
  DBR42
  DBR43
  DBU42
  DBU43
  DBS41
  DBS43
  DBX41
  DBX43
  DB441
  DB443

Signal Support

Company C

 

LEN
RRAU
LOS
TST (TACSAT)
TRT (tropo)

  DB44
  DBR44
  DB444
  DBS44
  DBX44

 

MSE FREQUENCY MANAGEMENT REQUIREMENTS

 

5-57. MSE is the primary element of the ACUS, and its frequency management is an important task on the force-projection battlefield. However, it is only part of the total frequency management process. Both the CNR system and the ADDS also require frequency management support. These three systems are not mutually exclusive. The NPT provides an effective capability to manage the frequency spectrum for all three communications systems, while ensuring that the corps and its associated divisions can engage in a combat situation with minimum frequency interference. The NPT uses authorized frequencies obtained by the frequency manager to support VHF, UHF, and SHF spectrum requirements. The NPT tactical frequency assignment model (TACFAM) application develops frequency assignments for LOS radio links and performs link and site engineering and deconfliction based on selected parameters. Table 5-10 shows the number of MSE emitters in the corps AO. Table 5-11 shows the NPT frequency management capabilities.

Table 5-10. Number of MSE Emitters

Element

Number of MSE
Emitters

RAU
MSRT
LOS Node Center
LOS (Extension Node/RAU)
LOS (EAC/NATO/MISC)
SHF

 736
1900
 504
 554
  12
 428

Table 5-11. NPT Frequency Management Capabilities

Radio Equipment

Frequency Assignment

LOS Radio, AN/GRC-226(V)
(VHF)

  • One set of frequencies per LOS radio link
  • Two frequency plans
  • Two frequency bands:
    • 225.0 to 400.0 MHz
    • 1350 to 1850 MHz

Radio, AN/GRC-224(P)
(SHF)

  • One set of frequencies per SHF radio link
  • One frequency plan (14.50 to 15.35 GHz)
  • Frequency subband L and M

Mobile Subscribers, RT-1539(P)/G
(VHF)

  • One active frequency plan per corps
  • Up to 96 sets of frequencies per plan (3 subplans of 32 sets)
  • One frequency band (30 to 88 MHz) OCONUS
  • Two frequency bands:
    • 30-50 MHz (training)
    • 30-88 MHz (operations)
  5-58. The NPT VHF planning/management application uses the VHF input to develop the RAU/MSRT frequency plan. Coordination is then made with the system planner for distributing the frequency plan throughout the corps. The Revised Battlefield Electronics Communications-Electronics Operating Instructions (CEOI) System (RBECS) is the primary SOI management tool.

FREQUENCY MANAGEMENT REQUIREMENTS

  5-59. The following paragraphs cover UHF parameters, SHF parameters, and LOS antenna polarization.
UHF PARAMETERS
  5-60. The UHF radio (AN/GRC-226) operates in two frequency bands. Band I is known as Band A and covers the frequency range from 225 to 400 MHz. Band III is known as Band B and covers the frequency range from 1350 to 1850 MHz. The SCC-2 system manager(s) select(s) the appropriate frequency band when preparing the open LOS radio link project.
Signal-to-Interference Ratio
 

5-61. Table 5-12 provides AN/GRC-226 signal-to-interference ratios. This data represents operation at the highest (1,024 kbps) data rate. The data assumes a signal level at the terminal to the receiver unit at -88 dBm. Signal-to-interference ratios corresponding to various frequency separations between the received signal and the interference signal are given. The data applies to operation in either frequency Band I or III, respectively.

Table 5-12. AN/GRC-226 Radio Signal-to-Interference Ratio


Signal-to-Interference Frequency Spacing
(MHz)

Signal-to-Interference Radio Limitation1
(dB)

0
1.0
2.0
3.0
9.0

21
16
-1
-36
-70 (and lower)

1 + Means signal power > interference power.
- Means signal power < interference power.

Cable Loss Value
 

5-62. The following transmit and receive cable loss values represent the maximum attenuation for each of the two frequency bands.

  • At 400 MHz 3.5 dB.
  • At 1850 MHz 8.5 dB.

5-63. If frequency scaling is used within the computer program, the following adjustment factors can be used:

  • Within the 225 to 400 MHz band, cable attenuation increases at 1.25 dB/octave from a minimum of 2.4 dB at 225 MHz to a maximum of 3.5 dB at 400 MHz.
  • Within the 1350 to 1850 MHz band, cable attenuation increases at 3.0 dB/octave from a minimum of 6.5 dB at 1350 MHz to a maximum of 8.5 dB at 1850 MHz.

5-64. Otherwise, the maximum values given above are used throughout the respective bands.

Receiver Sensitivity
 

5-65. The minimum receiver sensitivity for each of the two frequency bands is--

  • 225 to 400 MHz -90 dBm.
  • 1350 to 1850 MHz -89 dBm.

These values represent performance limits for the maximum data rate used. The maximum energy delivered by the transmitter for each of the two frequency bands is

  • 225 to 400 MHz band, +10 dBw at 1024 kbps.
  • 1350 to 1850 MHz band, +7 dBw at 1024 kbps.
SHF PARAMETERS
 

5-66. The SHF radio AN/GRC-224(P) operates in a single frequency band. This band is 14,500 to 15,341 MHz and is divided into eight subbands. The subbands are paired to each other for the assignment of transmit and receive frequencies. The frequency manager selects the SHF frequency band when preparing the open LOS radio link project. Table 5-13 shows SHF and channel allocations for bands L and M. Band L is assigned to switches and Band M is assigned to LOS radio terminals. The following values characterize the performance of the SHF radio relative to the system communications margin computation.

  • Maximum transmitter power at the antenna, operating at 4,096 kbps: +13 dBm.
  • Transmitter and receiver are located directly at the antenna; therefore, no cable loss.
  • Receiver sensitivity, operating at 4,096 kbps: -77 dBm. No quantitative data is available on the SHF radio's signal-to- interference performance. Table 5-14 shows estimated SHF radio signal-to-interference ratios. This estimated data is used until more accurate data can be provided.
LOS ANTENNA POLARIZATION
 

5-67. The antennas can operate at either vertical or horizontal polarization. The NPT selects the antenna polarization for each LOS radio link by either an automatic or a manual mode.

Table 5-13. SHF Bands L and M Frequency (in MHz) and Channel Allocations

Band L Channel Frequency

Band M Channel Frequency

01   14648.0
02   14651.5
03   14655.0
04   14658.5
05   14662.0
06   14665.5
07   14669.0
08   14672.5
09   14676.0
10   14679.5
11   14683.0
12   14686.5
13   14690.0
14   14693.5
15   14697.0
16   14700.5
17   14704.0
18   14707.5
19   14711.0
20   14714.5
21   14718.0
22   14721.5
23   14725.0
24   14728.5
25   14732.0
26   14735.5
27   14739.0
28   14742.5
29   14746.0
30   14749.5
31   14753.0
32   14756.5
33   14760.0
34   14763.5
35   14767.0
36   14770.5
37   14774.0
38   14777.5
39   14781.0
40   14784.5
41   14788.0
42   14791.5
43   14795.0
44   14798.5
45   14802.0
46   14805.5
47   14809.0
48   14812.5
49   14816.0
01   15033.0
02   15036.5
03   15040.0
04   15043.5
05   15047.0
06   15050.5
07   15054.0
08   15057.5
09   15061.0
10   15064.5
11   15068.0
12   15071.5
13   15075.0
14   15078.5
15   15082.0
16   15085.5
17   15089.0
18   15092.5
19   15096.0
20   15099.5
21   15103.0
22   15106.5
23   15110.0
24   15113.5
25   15117.0
26   15120.5
27   15124.0
28   15127.5
29   15131.0
30   15134.5
31   15138.0
32   15141.5
33   15145.0
34   15148.5
35   15152.0
36   15155.5
37   15159.0
38   15162.5
39   15166.0
40   15169.5
41   15173.0
42   15176.5
43   15180.0
44   15183.5
45   15187.0
46   15190.5
47   15194.0
48   15197.5
49   15201.0

Table 5-14. Estimated SHF radio signal-to-interference limitations

Signal-to-Interference Frequency Spacing (MHz)

Signal-to-Interference Radio Limitation1
(dB)

0
4.0
8.0
12.0
36.0

21
16
-1
-36
-70 (and lower)

1 +   Means signal power > interference power.
-   Means signal power < interference power.

 



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