Find a Security Clearance Job!

Military

Chapter 3

Organization and Equipment

This chapter details the organizational structure and equipment of the units responsible for installing, operating, and maintaining the MSE network.

CORPS SIGNAL BRIGADE

 

3-1. The standard corps signal brigade is the center of the corps MSE network (Figure 3-1). It consists of a headquarters and headquarters company (HHC), one or more corps area signal battalions depending on the size of the corps, a corps support signal battalion, a range extension company, and a visual information company. It provides SYSCON of the corps area MSE network and provides TECHCON of the division signal battalions' installed components. The advantages of this arrangement are-

  • Greater operational flexibility.
  • Increased logistics support efficiency.
  • Easier personnel management.
  • Centralized MSE assets control.

Figure 3-1. Standard Corps Signal Brigade

  3-2. The HHC corps signal brigade consists of the brigade headquarters, the headquarters company, and the corps signal office (Figure 3-2). Figure 3-3 lists the functions of the HHC.

Figure 3-2. HHC Corps Signal Brigade

HHC Functions

Directs and coordinates operations of the corps signal brigade including its battalions.

Supervises the installation, operation, and maintenance of the corps communications systems.

Provides the facilities the signal brigade commander uses to command and control the brigade including the SCC-2s.

Provides a signal staff element (corps signal office) to advise the corps on communications and COMSEC matters (corps and brigade COMSEC offices of record).

Operates a semi-automated SYSCON (fully automated with the fielding of ISYSCON).

Performs all signal management system functions for the signal brigade commander (network control branch).

Installs, operates, and maintains TACSAT communications systems and AN/TYC-39 message switches.

Figure 3-3. HHC Functions

 

3-3. The brigade headquarters has a command section, administrative section, operations/intelligence section, and logistics section. The operations/intelligence section consists of the plans/intelligence section, signal engineering branch, network control branch, and the brigade COMSEC office of record (BCOR). The brigade headquarters establishes the SYSCON center as part of the brigade CP.

3-4. The plans/intelligence section is part of the S3/SYSCON for the brigade. Figure 3-4 lists the functions of the plans/intelligence section.

Plans/Intelligence Section Functions

Plans, coordinates, and supervises the plans and intelligence requirements for the brigade.

Develops training plans for the brigade's defensive chemical operations.

Assesses chemical operations and training situations

Figure 3-4. Plans/Intelligence Section Functions

  3-5. The signal engineering branch is part of the S3/SYSCON for the brigade. Figure 3-5 lists the functions of the signal engineering branch.

Signal Engineering Branch Functions

Develops plans for establishing communications systems.

Determines equipment suitability, adaptability, and compatibility with existing military communication systems.

Determines installation and employment for quality transmissions over installed systems.

Responds to frequency requests and maintains associated records for brigade units.

Integrates allied, joint, and commercial communications into the corps communications network.

Analyzes traffic status reports.

Maintains direct coordination with the SCC-2/SYSCON in the network control branch.

Informs the SCC-2/SYSCON of current and future facility needs throughout the corps communications network.

Figure 3-5. Signal Engineering Branch Functions

 

3-6. The network control branch is part of the S3/SYSCON. Figure 3-6 lists the network control branch functions. The network control branch installs, operates, and maintains two SCC-2s: one active and one standby. The SCC-2s facilitate network management and control tasks with computer-assisted tools. These tools-

  • Assist in issuing OPORDs and directives to node managers.
  • Assist in receiving and processing messages and reports.
  • Manage radio frequencies (RFs), COMSEC, equipment/personnel status reports, system activation/deactivation, and reconfiguration including network radio links.

3-7. The BCOR is part of the S3/SYSCON and is responsible for the brigade COMSEC account. It also provides COMSEC logistics support for the control and distribution of internal brigade and subordinate battalion COMSEC material.

Network Control Branch Functions

Provides MSE automated frequency management.

Performs terrain analysis and path profiling.

Conducts automated system engineering functions.

Provides equipment status reporting.

Performs COMSEC key management.

Provides link and network load status.

Maintains personnel management database.

Manages system traffic flow and grade of service.

Figure 3-6. Network Control Branch Functions

 

3-8. The headquarters company has a company headquarters, communications-electronics (CE) maintenance section, motor maintenance section, unit ministry team, and a Civil/Judge Advocate (CJA) section. It may contain a support platoon headquarters that provides the TACSAT section and a modular tactical communication center (MTCC). Figure 3-7 lists the functions of the headquarters company.

 

Note: Signal brigades that have an organic company do not require the TACSAT section in the brigade HHC.

Headquarters Company Functions

Provides internal support to the brigade and to the company.

Maintains communications equipment for the brigade.

Maintains the vehicles for the brigade.

Figure 3-7. Headquarters Company Functions

  3-9. The corps signal office has a corps COMSEC office of record (CCOR) and an information service support office. The corps signal office is responsible for performing signal management functions for the corps. These functions provide adequate communications to the corps commander for commanding and controlling his forces. Figure 3-8 lists the functions of the corps signal office.

 Corps Signal Office Functions

Advises on command signal matters.

Prepares signal estimates, plans, and orders.

Supervises signal activities within the command.

Manages corps unit signal requirements.

Manages operational and contingency COMSEC matters.

Develops COMSEC operational plans and policies.

Plans, designs, and manages the integration and interconnectivity of tactical and nontactical information networks and communications systems.

Figure 3-8. Corps Signal Office Functions

CORPS AREA SIGNAL BATTALION

 

3-10. The corps area signal battalion provides the signal facilities that support the plans developed by the corps signal staff and the corps signal brigade staff. The corps area signal battalion consists of an HHC, three standard area signal companies, and a signal support company (Figure 3-9). Figure 3-10 lists the functions of the corps area signal battalion.

3-11. The airborne corps area signal battalion has three variations. One battalion has two contingency area companies and one standard area company. A second battalion has two standard area companies and one contingency area company. The third battalion has three standard area companies. All battalions have an NC instead of a LEN in the support company.

Figure 3-9. Typical Corps Area Signal Battalion

 

Corps Area Signal Battalion Functions

Advises the signal brigade commander on all communication matters.

Directs the installation, operation, and maintenance of battalion communications systems and facilities for implementing plans developed by the corps signal staff to support unit communication requirements.

Operates the operations/intelligence section.

Plans and coordinates staff supervision of plans, requirements, and battalion training program.

Plans and supervises communications support for the signal brigade plan.

Prepares signal plans to incorporate into the signal brigade plans and orders.

Coordinates with other headquarters staff sections regarding their communication needs.

Exercises staff supervision over radio communication activities.

Prepares signal plans, orders, and radio communication SOI items.

Coordinates frequency allocation assignment and use.

Reports and processes interface problems.

Manages force integration of information system resources.

Plans and coordinates with higher headquarters for information systems upgrade, replacement, elimination, and/or integration within units.

Plans AISs integration.

Provides staff supervision of analysis and software support and automated systems troubleshooting.

Manages and supervises ADP related areas.

Designs and develops command information systems.

Monitors unique "application program" development.

Supervises maintenance of tactical databases.

Plans newly assigned or attached unit database integration.

Provides automated resources security training.

Figure 3-10. Corps Area Signal Battalion Functions

 

3-12. The HHC of the corps area signal battalion consists of the battalion headquarters and a company headquarters (Figure 3-11). The battalion headquarters has a command section, an administrative section, a logistics section, an operations/intelligence section, a CE maintenance section, a motor maintenance section, and a unit ministry team. The operations/intelligence section coordinates the installation of NCs, LENs, SENs, and RAUs. The CE maintenance section performs DS maintenance of all organic CE and COMSEC equipment for the battalion. This section can send CE and COMSEC maintenance contact teams to repair faulty equipment at deployed sites.

Figure 3-11. HHC Corps Area Signal Battalion

 

3-13. Each area signal company has a company headquarters and two nodal platoons (Figure 3-12). Each nodal platoon consists of a platoon headquarters, two NC sections, and two extension switch sections. The NC section installs, operates, and maintains the NCS, four LOS(V3)s, and a local RAU. The extension switch section deploys LOS assemblages to support the SENS(V1) and (V2) and the remote RAU.

3-14. Each area signal company and each support company has one military occupational specialty (MOS) 31F and one 31P, with a spares facility (AN/TSM-183), to perform on-site MSE nodal maintenance. These personnel were previously consolidated at the battalion HHC CE maintenance section.

Figure 3-12. Area Signal Company

 

3-15. The typical signal support company (Figure 3-13) has a company headquarters, large extension switch platoon, and an extension switch support platoon. The large extension switch platoon has a platoon headquarters, a large extension switch section, and a cable/wire section. The extension switch support platoon has a platoon headquarters, an extension switch support section, and a cable/wire section. Signal support companies differ in the number of personnel and equipment they are authorized based on its mission.

Figure 3-13. Corps Area Signal Battalion Signal Support Company

CORPS SUPPORT SIGNAL BATTALION

 

3-16. The corps signal brigade has a corps support signal battalion. It has an HHC, two area signal companies, and a signal support company (Figure 3-14). The corps support signal battalion provides communication support throughout the corps AO.

3-17. The airborne corps support signal battalion has one standard area company, one contingency area company, one TRI-TAC company, and one NC instead of a LEN in the support company.

Figure 3-14. Corps Support Signal Battalion

 

3-18. The support signal battalion's HHC consists of a battalion headquarters and a company headquarters (Figure 3-15). The battalion headquarters consists of a command section, an administrative section, a logistics section, an operations/intelligence section, a CE maintenance section, a motor maintenance section, and a unit ministry team. The operations/intelligence staff section coordinates the installation of NCs, LENS, SENS, and RAUs. The CE maintenance section performs DS maintenance of all organic CE and COMSEC equipment for the battalion. This section can send CE and COMSEC maintenance contact teams to repair faulty equipment at deployed sites.

3-19. The signal support company has a large extension switch platoon, a company headquarters, and an extension switch support platoon (Figure 3-16). Each area signal company and each support company has one MOS 31F and one 31P, with a spares facility (AN/TSM-183), to perform on-site MSE nodal maintenance. These personnel were previously consolidated at the battalion HHC CE maintenance section. The structure and capabilities of these platoons are similar to those of the area signal battalion support company. The large extension switch platoon has a large extension switch section and two cable/wire sections. The extension switch support platoon has an extension switch support section and two cable/wire sections.

Figure 3-15. HHC Support Signal Battalion

Figure 3-16. Signal Support Company, Corps Support Battalion

DIVISION SIGNAL BATTALION

 

3-20. The division signal battalion provides communication support to major subscribers, CPs, and operational facilities in heavy and light divisions. The battalion's structure is similar to a corps area signal battalion. The typical division signal battalion has an HHC, two area signal companies, and a signal support company (Figure 3-17).

 

Note: The heavy division has three area signal companies that are organized the same as in the corps signal brigade.

Figure 3-17. Division Signal Battalion

 

3-21. The division signal battalion's personnel and staff sections are similar to the corps. The G6 section and the operations/intelligence section ensure quality communications throughout the division. The division signal commander is designated as the G6 and is the principal advisor to the division commander for all division communications. The G6 serves in the dual role of commander of the signal battalion and as a member of the general staff. These two functional roles are separate but related.

3-22. As the signal battalion commander, the G6 commands, directs, and supervises the battalion's efforts to complete their assigned missions. As a member of the general staff, the G6 presents the communication aspects for tactical operations for all staff planning. The G6 consults directly with the Chief of Staff (CofS) on all communication matters.

3-23. The G6 performs management, operations, and maintenance of the commands communication and information systems using the SCC-2. This system assists the G6 and the deputy G6 in managing the division's communications systems by providing planning, management, and C2 of tactical communications networks. The deputy G6 and the COMSEC officer assist the G6 in these efforts. The deputy G6 locates at the division tactical signal office and represents the G6 in providing communications support to the division.

3-24. The G6 also conducts active liaison with the signal officers of higher headquarters, adjacent headquarters, and military intelligence (MI) battalion combat electronic warfare intelligence (CEWI) representatives.

3-25. The G6's staff ensures COMSEC complies with the current regulations, RF allocation and assignment, and division unit COMSEC logistics support. The signal battalion performs only COMSEC logistics support for the division.

3-26. The division signal battalion's staff sections implement communications planning and engineering, OPCON (in stand-alone mode), and administrative and logistics direction. The staff uses the tasking from the corps communications plan to develop the division network. When operating in the stand-alone mode, it develops its own communications plan. Active monitoring of the network's operational status ensures that it meets the corps' changing requirement and its own. This responsibility belongs to the operations/intelligence section.

3-27. The division COMSEC office of record (DCOR) is responsible for the division COMSEC account. It provides COMSEC logistics support for the control and distribution of internal division COMSEC material. The division signal battalion staff implements, manages, and maintains the division COMSEC keys for the division.

3-28. The HHC consists of a battalion headquarters and a company headquarters (Figure 3-18). The battalion headquarters has a command section, an administrative/logistics section, an operations/intelligence section, a division signal office, a motor maintenance section, a CE/COMSEC maintenance section, and a DCOR. The operations/intelligence section installs, operates, and maintains the division signal battalion's SCC-2. The division area signal company's structure, personnel, and equipment are the same as the corps area signal company. The CE maintenance section performs DS maintenance of all organic CE and COMSEC equipment for the battalion. This section can send CE and COMSEC maintenance contact teams to repair faulty equipment at deployed sites.

Figure 3-18. HHC Division Signal Battalion

  3-29. The division signal support company has a company headquarters, an EPLRS platoon, a TACSAT platoon, and a general support platoon (Figure 3-19). It is similar to the corps area signal battalion's signal support company in mission. Each area signal company and each support company has one MOS 31F and one 31P, with a spares facility (AN/TSM-183), to perform on-site MSE nodal maintenance. These personnel were previously consolidated at the battalion HHC CE maintenance section. However, its organization and equipment are different. The EPLRS, TACSAT, and general support platoons are described below.

Figure 3-19. Division Signal Support Company

 

3-30. The EPLRS platoon includes a platoon headquarters and four EPLRS sections. EPLRS provides the capabilities needed to support the data distribution requirements of ABCS. It comprises the Army Data Distribution System (ADDS) that supports the ABCS components listed below.

  • Air Missile Defense Planning and Control System (AMDPCS).
  • Maneuver Control System (MCS).
  • Advanced Field Artillery Tactical Data System (AFATDS).
  • All Source Analysis System (ASAS).
  • Combat Service Support Control System (CSSCS).
  • Force XXI Battle Command - Brigade and Below (FBCB2).

3-31. The TACSAT platoon includes a platoon headquarters and a multichannel TACSAT section. The multichannel TACSAT extends the distance of the ACUS by using strategic and tactical terminals for transmitting multiplexed voice and data channels.

3-32. The typical general support platoon consists of a platoon headquarters, an extension switch section, a wire section, and an FM retransmission section (Figure 3-20). The wire section installs and maintains the RMC TD-1234, CX-11230A/G and CX-4566 26-pair cables, J-1077 distribution boxes, WF-16, and local telephones. The FM retransmission section has three teams that provide single-channel retransmission stations for division level FM voice nets.

Figure 3-20. General Support Platoon

MSE EMPLOYMENT CHARACTERISTICS

 

3-33. NCs are the hubs of the MSE network providing internodal connectivity (Figure 3-21). The NCS is the main element of the NC. It provides network access to local and mobile subscribers through the RAU. Local subscribers consist of node and network management personnel. The NCS provides network access for LENS and SENS. At least two internodal links are made when providing a gateway between an adjacent MSE network or to the EAC network. Division establishes at least one link to adjacent division(s). NC deployment is based on serviced CP deployment, topographical considerations, LOS requirements, and network interconnectivity requirements.

3-34. Rapid initial network deployment requires installing a preprogrammed backbone system. The S3/SYSCON uses the information provided by the deputy G6 to plan the backbone system. The designated area signal companies provide the assets to install, operate, and maintain the NCs. In the initial network, each NC must connect to at least three other NCs. As the network matures, each NC should connect to three or four other NCs to ensure optimum service and survivability.

3-35. The LENS serves 164 wire subscribers: 84 through local J-1077s and 80 through RMCs. The RMCs can be set out alone or two can link in series using CX-11230A/G cable. They provide access for up to eight wire line subscribers each. If the user unit requires access for more than eight subscribers, the RMCs are used in a paired configuration. Units that are next to each other and have eight or fewer subscribers use one RMC and CX-11230A/G cable each. The LENS can terminate up to five RMC groups of two.

Figure 3-21. Internodal Connectivity

 

3-36. The SEN or LEN can service CNR customers via a SDNRIU, TSEC/KY-90 (Figure 3-22). After the operator completes the connection, the SDNRIU functions automatically. Distribution of the TSEC/KY-90 is one per NC platoon in each of the area signal companies.

Figure 3-22. CNR Interface with MSE

 

3-37. RAUs are used in local and remote configurations. However, it does not mean both RAUs cannot be remoted; it depends on the availability of an LOS assemblage. Because RAUs constantly emit marker beacons declaring availability to affiliated MSRTs, those RAUs closest to the forward edge of the battle area (FEBA) must use electronic protection (EP) techniques to mask the emitter from the opposing force.

3-38. Deployment of the LOS assemblages must be considered to minimize the radio signature of the node. As an internodal link, the LOS(V3) can deploy on hills up to 400 meters from the node via CX-11230A/G cable. If the distance exceeds 400 meters, the SHF radio link can be used up to 10 kilometers (6.2 miles) (see Figure 3-23). SHF radio distribution to the NCs and LOS assemblages allows for remoting 50 percent of the radio links.

Figure 3-23. SHF Radio Link

 

3-39. The LOS(V2) supports the NATO analog interface (NAI) unit during combined operations (Figure 3-24). The LOS(V2) does not have SHF radio capability. The NAI locates at selected NCSs throughout the corps (Figure 3-25).

Figure 3-24. NATO/MSE Interface using LOS(V2)

Figure 3-25. NAI Deployment at an NCS

 

3-40. MSE network users gain mobile access using MSRTs. Figure 3-26 shows how the MSRT (AN/VRC-97) accesses the system through the RAU. MSRTs can receive or send voice, facsimile, or data traffic. When a RAU is deploying, it behaves like a mobile subscriber. The crew can place the DSVT (TSEC/KY-68) in the cab of the vehicle, configure one of its eight radios as an MSRT, and access another RAU.

SYSTEM CONTROL

 

3-41. The corps and division signal battalions deploy their MSE signal assets under the overall direction of the corps signal brigade. However, operational requirements may dictate an OPCON relationship between division signal battalion MSE assets and corps/division assets.

3-42. The corps signal brigade manages and controls the corps MSE network using the corps SCC-2. Within a corps MSE network, an active SCC-2 and a standby SCC-2 are netted for primary/regulatory network databases, displays, and processing services. This ensures continuity of operations. The active SCC-2 performs all automated network planning, management, and control for the corps. When in a corps network, the division SCC-2 functions in an active role but remains under the TECHCON of the corps' active SCC-2.

3-43. The corps signal brigade and the division signal battalion coordinate closely when moving and placing NCs. The respective division and corps signal battalion commanders are responsible for moving these assets. The corps signal brigade is responsible for maintaining network integrity, coverage, and service. The brigade accomplishes this by reallocating nodes, trunks, extension assets, and area responsibilities. In a division stand-alone configuration, the division SCC-2 assumes these functions and appoints responsibility for the division network elements.

3-44. Initial MPM is exercised through CNR nets. MPM decreases threat radio electronic combat (REC) vulnerability.

Figure 3-26. Mobile Subscriber Interface



NEWSLETTER
Join the GlobalSecurity.org mailing list