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F119 Achieves Significant Milestone Powering the F-22; 200,000 Flight Hours Logged During Safest Engine Introduction in USAF History

SINGAPORE AIR SHOW, Feb. 14, 2012 -- Pratt & Whitney’s F119, the world’s first fifth-generation engine and the predecessor to the F135, has surpassed the 200,000 flight hour milestone powering Lockheed Martin’s F-22 Raptor. This milestone recognizes the F119 as a fully mature engine. In addition, the F119 has demonstrated the safest and most reliable introduction of a fighter engine in United States Air Force history. Pratt & Whitney is a United Technologies Corp. (NYSE:UTX) company.

“Pratt & Whitney is proud of the F119 program’s achievement and safety record and looks forward to another 200,000 flight hours powering the F-22 Raptor,” said Cliff Stone, director, F119 Program, Pratt & Whitney. “With the F119 leading the way, we are able to celebrate the many accomplishments of the F135 powering the F-35 today. The continued maturation of our technology is another testament to the team and product at Pratt & Whitney.”

The progression from the F119 to the next generation F135 engine significantly decreases the operational risk of the single engine F-35 aircraft. The F135 is the only engine powering the F-35 aircraft and currently in production for customers worldwide.

Pratt & Whitney is a world leader in the design, manufacture and service of aircraft engines, space propulsion systems and industrial gas turbines. United Technologies, based in Hartford, Conn., is a diversified company providing high technology products and services to the global aerospace and building industries.

This press release contains forward-looking statements concerning future business opportunities and operational engine performance. Actual results may differ materially from those projected as a result of certain risks and uncertainties, including but not limited to changes in funding related to the F-35 aircraft and F135 engines, changes in government procurement priorities and practices or in the number of aircraft to be built; challenges in the design, development, production and support of advanced technologies; as well as other risks and uncertainties, including but not limited to those detailed from time to time in United Technologies Corp.'s Securities and Exchange Commission filings.




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