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U.S. Fleet Forces to Commence Solid Curtain/Citadel Shield '10

Navy NewsStand

Story Number: NNS100319-16
Release Date: 3/19/2010 2:21:00 PM

From U.S. Fleet Forces Command Public Affairs

NORFOLK, Va. (NNS) -- Navy shore installations and activities in the continental United States, Hawaii and Guam will participate in Exercise Solid Curtain-Citadel Shield '10 (SC/CS-10), an annual security training exercise coordinated by U.S. Fleet Forces Command (USFF) from March 22-26.

The weeklong security exercise is the largest anti-terrorism/force protection (AT/FP) exercise conducted nationwide. It is designed to enhance the training and readiness of Naval Security Force personnel to respond to threats to installations and units, leveraging all processes security forces would implement in the event of an actual emergency.

"Instead of having numerous smaller exercises, Exercise Solid Curtain/Citadel Shield is a single, large, integrated exercise that accurately emulates what may happen in the real world," said Capt. Sam A. McCormick, USFF director for Fleet Anti-Terrorism.

As the Navy component for U.S. Northern Command (NORTHCOM), USFF will also use SC/CS-10 to enhance their ability to support NORTHCOM's Homeland Defense mission.

"Solid Curtain is mainly an operational-level training event, while Citadel Shield, conducted by Commander Naval Installation Command, will provide advance guidance for personnel involved with the individual field training exercises," said McCormick.

SC/CS-10 will consist of more than 250 individual training events across the country, each designed to test different regional AT/FP operations. Scenarios range from events such as recognizing and countering base surveillance operations, to higher-tempo and active simulated emergencies such as small boat attacks on waterfront bases and cyber attacks on installations.

"We are really focusing on the land-sea interface at the waterfront, as well as active shooter scenarios, in light of the incident at Ft. Hood," said McCormick.

Many communication tools will be used to keep base personnel informed about exercise security situations. Computer network alert systems will distribute messages to office computers and the "giant voice system"will be used to immediately alert people base-wide. The giant voice system is an outdoor intercom loud enough to alert anyone outside on base of a potential threat.

While disruptions to normal base and station operations will be limited, there may be times when the exercise causes increased traffic or delays in base access. Area residents may also see increased security activity associated with the exercise.

"There will be possible traffic and base access delays during the exercise; however, we have set up the exercise to minimize the impact to local communities," said McCormick.

During the exercise, assessors will collect information and relay that data to decision makers to improve AT/FP practices and procedures in the future.

"We will have assessors here on the battle watch floor and threat working groups to look for any inconsistencies in the reporting processes and procedures," said McCormick. "This feedback will enable us, in a training environment in a realistic scenario, to address issues that will make us more ready and prepared for any actual event."



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