The Largest Security-Cleared Career Network for Defense and Intelligence Jobs - JOIN NOW

Military

Yokota shouldering runway taxi project

by Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Jason Segedy
Det. 10, AFNEWS


5/4/2007 - YOKOTA AIR BASE, Japan (AFNEWS) -- A $300,000 project is underway here to make long-term fixes to the pavement on the flightline's northwest shoulder and taxiway.

The construction started April 16 and its estimated completion date is June 15.

In addition to preventing foreign-object damage, or FOD, these repairs save money, according to Yokota Air Base's airfield manager.

Seemingly insignificant things such as cracks in pavement can eventually lead to foreign object damage in aircraft.

Yokota Air Base, Japan's Civil Engineering Squadron and Airfield Management are constantly working to keep cracks patched and fix other discrepancies but sometimes the funds aren't there.

"It's tough trying to get the money," said Tech. Sergeant Eric Nixon, deputy airfield manager.

"Trying to get the time and also trying not to limit too much of the air traffic because when we shut down an area, it isn't useable," he said.

The tearing out and repaving of the flightline's northwest shoulder and taxiway is part of the project. When funds aren't available, the 374th Civil Engineering Squadron has to fill in cracks in the pavement. This temporary fix doesn't last as long.

"When we do a permanent fix, we're reducing closures," said Glenn Prince, the airfield manager for Yokota's flightline.

"In the long run it saves in fuel, and it's more efficient because aircraft can use primary routes," Mr. Prince said.

Permanent fixes last anywhere from five up to about 10 years, while fixing cracks individually lasts usually a maximum of 3 years she said.

"We're responsible for the overall operations of the airfield," said Mr. Prince. "We ensure the airfield is managed and in compliance to all the rules, and this project is just one more step."

"Any problems that come up can affect an aircraft," said Sergeant Nixon. "FOD it out, break it down, that kind of thing."

"We're responsible for the overall operations of the airfield," Mr. Prince said. "We ensure the airfield is managed and in compliance to all the rules; and this project is just one more step."



NEWSLETTER
Join the GlobalSecurity.org mailing list