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Thales Australia Supports Army's Tactical Communications Network

21 March 2007

ADI Limited trading as Thales Australia is proud to announce that it is scheduled to take over the management of the Commonwealth's radio repair facility in NSW.

Thales Australia will then be responsible for repairing and maintaining over 90% of the Army's Combat Net Radios (CNR).

Pintails, Wagtails and Raven radios are repaired at the Moorebank facility while the AN/PRC-148 MultiBand
Inter/Intra Team Radio (MBITR) and its ancillary equipment is repaired and maintained at Thales Australia's workshops on Garden Island, Sydney.

Thales Australia has supplied the Australian Defence Force with approximately 3,000 MBITRs since 1999.

The MBITR is a key element of the communications equipment employed by Australian personnel in harsh operational conditions such as Afghanistan and Iraq.

Thales Communications Inc, the manufacturers of the MBITR recently announced that they have entered into full scale production of the upgraded version called the AN/PRC-148 Joint Tactical Radio System (JTRS) Enhanced MBITR (JEM).

The JEM is the radio being proposed by Thales Australia to the Australian Defence Force for their CNR needs.

The JEM was developed under the U.S government's US$7 billion JTRS program (formerly called Cluster 2) and is manufactured by Thales Communications at its facility in the U.S. The JEM is a rugged, lightweight, multiband handheld radio weighing less than one kilogram.

It operates and provides inter/intra team communications ground-to-ground, ground-to-air and over satellite.

In addition, the JEM affords improved security, is capable of hosting future waveforms and offers access to higher data throughput and networking capabilities.

The JEM's user interface and operation are consistent with the MBITR; thus, additional training is minimized and the equipment can be fielded immediately.

The U.S. Army has recently ordered more than 5,000 JEMs. The JEM is expected to be employed in Australia in the near future.



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