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Multimission DD(X) Destroyer Successfully Completes Flag-Level Critical Design Review

Navy NewsStand

Story Number: NNS050916-21
Release Date: 9/17/2005 8:00:00 AM

From Program Executive Office Ships

WASHINGTON (NNS) -- The U.S. Navy successfully achieved a significant milestone for the multimission DD(X) destroyer with the completion of a system-wide Critical Design Review (CDR) Sept. 14.

The review represents the culmination of years of design effort that encompassed the ship, mission system, human and shore designs that now comprise DD(X).

DD(X) is the Navy’s planned next-generation destroyer, tailored for land attack and inland support of joint and coalition forces. It is designed to meet Marine Corps, Army and special operations requirements for precision strike ashore, but also be able to outmatch current and projected threats in the air, on the surface and under water.

The completion of CDR marks the end of Phase III development, which resulted in the design, construction and test of 10 engineering development models (EDM) that will make DD(X) the Navy’s most capable multimission surface combatant ever constructed.

“DD(X) System CDR brings this incredible warship class one step closer from next generation to current generation," according to Rear Adm. Charles Hamilton, the Navy’s program executive officer for ships. “The Navy and National Team have accomplished the most thorough ship design and integration process in the history of Navy shipbuilding. I am proud of their achievement and believe their accomplishment sets a new standard in acquisition.”

“DD(X) CDR reflects a disciplined, rigorous process of risk mitigation in 10 EDMs. CDRs for each of the 10 EDMs have achieved both technical maturity as well as significant cost insight,“ he said. “Completion of the ship CDR is the culmination of three years of work executed on schedule and within one percent of stated budget,” Hamilton said.

“The National Team and Navy have achieved an unprecedented level of system design integration to deliver a balanced design that provides the required warfighting capability,” said Rear Adm. Chuck Goddard, DD(X) program manager. “We’ve matured the systems we need to build this class, and are ready to proceed to Milestone B and begin detail design and construction.”

Under the Navy’s proposed dual-yard acquisition strategy, Northrop Grumman Ship Systems and General Dynamics Bath Iron Works will simultaneously build lead ships beginning in fiscal year 2007. Pending final approval of the plan, the Defense Department has authorized the Navy to award advance contracts to assist both shipyards to prepare to transition into detail design after the Milestone B decision. Development of major ship systems will continue under separate contracts.



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