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14 February 2005

U.S. Ambassador to Nepal Summoned to Washington for Consultations

U.S. considers steps to support democracy, peace, security in Nepal

U.S.  Ambassador to Nepal James Moriarty has been asked to return to Washington for consultations on steps the United States and members of the international community can take to support the Nepalese people's quest for democracy, peace, security and development, State Department spokesman Richard Boucher said in a statement February 14.

Ambassador Moriarty will return to Nepal after the consultations, which are scheduled to last a week, Boucher's statement said.

"We remain deeply troubled by developments in Nepal.  King Gyanendra's dismissal of the government, declaration of a state of emergency, detention of politicians, human rights workers and students and the suspension of fundamental constitutional rights is a step away from Nepal's path toward democracy," Boucher's statement said.

Following is the text of Boucher's statement:

(begin text)

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE
Office of the Spokesman
February 14, 2005

STATEMENT BY RICHARD BOUCHER, SPOKESMAN

Consultations for U.S. Ambassador to Nepal

U.S. Ambassador to Nepal James F. Moriarty has been asked to return to Washington for consultations.  The Ambassador will be meeting with State Department and other U.S. officials for a week as the United States, together with our international partners, considers what steps we will take to support the Nepalese people's quest for democracy, peace, security and development.  He will then return to Nepal.

We remain deeply troubled by developments in Nepal.  King Gyanendra's dismissal of the government, declaration of a state of emergency, detention of politicians, human rights workers and students and the suspension of fundamental constitutional rights is a step away from Nepal's path toward democracy.  The King needs to restore and protect civil and human rights, promptly release those detained under the state of emergency and move quickly toward the restoration of civil liberties and multi-party democratic institutions under a constitutional monarchy.

The United States supports a peaceful, prosperous, and democratic Nepal.  The protection of civil and human rights and strengthening of multi-party democracy are key components of Nepal's progressing along this path.  We call on those in Nepal who are committed to the country's future to engage in meaningful political discussions leading to national elections.  Those among the Maoists who wish to be a part of Nepal's future leadership must abandon their armed struggle and join the political mainstream through dialogue and peaceful means.

(end text)

(Distributed by the Bureau of International Information Programs, U.S. Department of State. Web site: http://usinfo.state.gov)



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