Military

VOICE OF AMERICA
SLUG: 4-0103 Al Zawahari Al Qaida
DATE:
NOTE NUMBER:

DATE=3/18/2004

TYPE=ENGLISH PROGRAMS REPORT

TITLE=AL ZAWAHARI / AL QAIDA

NUMBER=4-0103

BYLINE=ERIN BRUMMETT

PHONE=203-4258

DATELINE=WASHINGTON

Inserts are available in Dalet - SOD/English News Now/Reports

INTRO: Senior Pakistani officials say they believe troops may have surrounded a top al-Qaida member in a remote tribal region bordering Afghanistan. The officials, speaking on condition of anonymity, say troops believe they have cornered Osama bin Laden's deputy Ayman al-Zawahari. President Pervez Musharraf said in a pre-recorded interview with C-N-N today (Thursday) that a high valued target could be among the militants because of the stiff resistance by those fighting government troops. U-S officials have not speculated on the identity of the high value target.

TEXT: Ayman al-Zawahari has been described as the brains behind al-Qaida because according to some experts he was able to help broaden the organization's influence. Russ Marion is an expert on leadership networks at Clemson University in South Carolina. He has been researching the al-Qaida leadership and network. Professor Marion explains how he believes Ayman al-Zawahari helped develop the al-Qaida network.

ACT#1: MARION :34

He (al Zawahari) was the mouthpiece in getting this thing (al-Qaida) converted from a series of regional, local, state terrorist organizations - there was a terrorist organization in Egypt, there was one in Lebanon.

END ACT

Clemson University's Russ Marion says Ayman Zawahari's capture or departure would not necessarily impact al-Qaida operations because the organization existed many years before him and because its leaders do not need to be living in order to be influential:

ACT#2: MARION :32

Al-Zawahari, Bin Laden, the major (al-Qaida leaders) - I think of them as catalysts, as opposed to having a physical impact on what the organizations do. I think in terms of what they catalyze. As a catalyst, they rally (garner) opinion, as a catalyst they focus opinion, as a catalyst they give people something to rally around. If you get rid of them, if you kill them, A, (first) there are going to be other catalysts, and B, (second) catalysts don't require a live person. You can be dead and be a catalyst as well.

END ACT

Professor Russ Marion is an expert on leadership networks at Clemson University in South Carolina.

VNN/EKB/ACC



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