The Largest Security-Cleared Career Network for Defense and Intelligence Jobs - JOIN NOW

Military

SLUG: 2-312021 Afghan U-S Bombing (S&L)
DATE:
NOTE NUMBER:

DATE=1/19/04

TYPE=CORRESPONDENT REPORT

TITLE=AFGHANISTAN U-S BOMBING (S/L)

NUMBER=2-312021

BYLINE=MICHAEL KITCHEN

DATELINE=ISLAMABAD

INTRO: Afghan officials say 11 civilians, including four children, were killed in an apparent mistaken air assault by U-S forces. V-O-A's Michael Kitchen reports from neighboring Pakistan, the U-S military says it is investigating the incident.

TEXT: The reported incident took place Sunday in central Afghanistan's Uruzgan Province, the site of recent fighting between U-S-led coalition forces and anti-government insurgents.

Haji Abdul-Rahman, the administrator for the district of Char Cheno, where the air attack is said to have taken place, told V-O-A that the assault was carried out by U-S aircraft, killing non-combatants, including women and children.

He says U-S troops had been operating in the area just prior to the incident.

Press reports quoted the provincial governor as confirming the civilian deaths.

U-S Central Command, in charge of military operations in Afghanistan, could not confirm the incident, but said it is investigating the reports.

/// REST OPT FOR LONG ///

Central Command spokeswoman, Lieutenant-Colonel Leslie Williams.

/// WILLIAMS ACT 1 ///

We are awaiting further information in order to release complete facts regarding the presumed incident here.

/// END ACT ///

Lieutenant Colonel Williams says U-S forces had skirmished with suspected insurgents earlier at a compound near where the air strike reportedly took place.

/// WILLIAMS ACT 2 ///

Coalition [soldiers] in Afghanistan did engage and kill five anti-coalition insurgents at a compound that was north of Dae Rawood.

/// END ACT ///

U-S forces are said to have mistakenly killed 15 civilians in two separate incidents last month, both of which are under investigation. (SIGNED)

NEB/MK/RAE/KBK



NEWSLETTER
Join the GlobalSecurity.org mailing list


One Billion Americans: The Case for Thinking Bigger - by Matthew Yglesias