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01 October 2002

Bush Says U.S. Policy on Jerusalem Has Not Changed

(President's Statement on Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal
Year 2003) (300)
President Bush on September 30 signed the Foreign Relations
Authorization Act for fiscal year 2003, and then issued a statement in
which he said the act contained provisions that "impermissibly
interfere with the constitutional functions of the presidency in
foreign affairs, including provisions that purport to establish
foreign policy that are of significant concern."
Noting that the section calling for U.S. recognition of Jerusalem as
Israel's capital interferes with his constitutional authority, the
President said he would consider such provisions to be "advisory,"
rather than "mandatory."
"U.S. policy on Jerusalem has not changed," the President said.
U.S. policy regards Jerusalem as a permanent status issue, which must
be negotiated by the Israelis and Palestinians.
Following is the excerpt on Jerusalem from President Bush's September
30 statement.
(begin excerpt)
I have today signed into law H.R. 1646, the "Foreign Relations
Authorization Act, Fiscal Year 2003." This Act authorizes
appropriations, and provides important new authorities, for diplomatic
and related activities of the U.S. Government. Many provisions in the
Act will strengthen our ability to advance American interests around
the globe, including nonproliferation of weapons of mass destruction,
and to meet our international commitments, including those to the
United Nations. Regrettably, the Act contains a number of provisions
that impermissibly interfere with the constitutional functions of the
presidency in foreign affairs, including provisions that purport to
establish foreign policy that are of significant concern.
. . . .  
Section 214, concerning Jerusalem, impermissibly interferes with the
President's constitutional authority to conduct the Nation's foreign
affairs and to supervise the unitary executive branch. Moreover, the
purported direction in section 214 would, if construed as mandatory
rather than advisory, impermissibly interfere with the President's
constitutional authority to formulate the position of the United
States, speak for the Nation in international affairs, and determine
the terms on which recognition is given to foreign states. U.S. policy
regarding Jerusalem has not changed.
(end excerpt)
(Distributed by the Office of International Information Programs, U.S.
Department of State. Web site: http://usinfo.state.gov)



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