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11 September 2002

Cheney Urges International Support for Anti-Terror Fight

(Outlines fears of an Iraq with weapons of mass destruction) (0)
Defending U.S. actions taken as part of its war on global terrorism,
Vice President Richard Cheney called upon the peoples of the world to
support America's cause.
"All who seek justice and dignity and the chance to live their own
lives can know they have a friend and ally in the United States of
America," said Cheney. "Americans are not a people who seek vengeance
or conquest. We fight for freedom and security, both for ourselves and
for others, and to build a future of greater peace and prosperity."
Cheney made his remarks September 10 in a videotaped address to the
Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington.
He described the period following the September 11 terrorist attacks
on New York and Washington as "a period of testing for the United
States," and said the American people had met that test. "We are
united. We understand the threats that have formed against us; we are
determined to protect our country, and we will prevail," said Cheney.
Cheney repeated the Bush Administration's warnings of the dangers
faced by the United States, the countries of the Middle East, and the
entire world if Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein were able to obtain
weapons of mass destruction.
"The whole range of weapons of mass destruction then would rest in the
hands of a dictator who has already shown his willingness to use such
weapons, and has done so, both in his war with Iran and against his
own people," said Cheney.
"Armed with an arsenal of these weapons of terror, and sitting atop 10
percent of the world's oil reserves, Saddam Hussein could then be
expected to seek domination of the entire Middle East, take control of
a great portion of the world's energy supplies and directly threaten
America's friends throughout the region, and subject the United States
or any other nation to nuclear blackmail," he said.
Cheney repeated the Bush Administration's view that "time is not on
our side," and said the international community "must know that the
United States will take whatever action is necessary to defend our
freedom and our security."
Following is a transcript of Vice President Cheney's remarks to the
Center for Strategic and International Studies:
(begin transcript)
THE WHITE HOUSE
Office of the Vice President
September 10, 2002
VIDEOTAPED REMARKS BY THE VICE PRESIDENT TO THE CENTER FOR STRATEGIC
AND INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
THE VICE PRESIDENT: Good evening. I had hoped to be with you tonight
at the Reagan Building, and I regret the change in schedule. I
appreciate this chance to speak to you on tape, even though my
charisma won't really come through on the screen.
I know I have many friends and former colleagues in the room this
evening, people I've been able to keep in touch with through notes or
phone calls, or by reading your op-eds. Let me thank you all for
supporting the good work of CSIS.
For four decades, this has been one of the most vital policy research
organizations in the country, standing at the center of the national
debate. Men and women holding positions of responsibility both in
public and private sectors have come to rely on insights from CSIS.
The material is consistently thoughtful, forward-thinking, and
original. Each of us is grateful to the organization and to its
people, especially to the man who was there at the beginning, and
provides leadership to this very day, Ambassador David Abshire.
I'm very pleased that your honorees this evening are two individuals
I've known for many years and count as close friends and trusted
advisors to this very day. Anne Armstrong, in addition to her fine
service in London, also spent years as Chairman of the President's
Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board, under Presidents Reagan and Bush.
I first knew her long before, when she was a counselor to the
President with Cabinet rank.
She was the first woman ever to hold that title, in the process,
becoming one of the most respected people in the federal government,
known to all as a superb manager and born diplomat, with the soundest
of judgment.
Many of you will recall that Anne's name was mentioned when President
Ford was looking for a running mate in the 1976 campaign. I was there,
and it was more than a mention. She was, in fact, almost chosen. And
Anne would have been a tremendous candidate. Maybe, if we'd selected
Anne, we would have won that election.
Anne is also a recipient of the nation's highest civilian honor, the
Presidential Medal of Freedom, as distinction shared as well by her
fellow honoree, Henry Kissinger. He, too, is someone I first met
several decades ago. We traveled a lot of miles together during our
days with President Ford, including Vladivostok, the Helsinki Summit
and Beijing.
Henry is a distinguished intellectual, but he's never operated from
the standpoint of a desk bound professor. He's among the most skilled
practitioners of diplomacy, and has a Nobel Peace Prize to show for
it. He sees America through the eyes of an experienced public servant,
but also as an Army veteran of World War II, and as a citizen who fled
the Nazis.
Even today, more than a quarter century after he left public office,
people at the highest levels of government, business and academia want
to know what Henry has to say. And after all of these years, he writes
articles so brilliant and subtle that some newspapers miss the point
entirely. Keep writing, Henry.
This evening, as we honor these two distinguished Americans, and mark
the first 40 years of the fine organization, we are thinking also of
the anniversary that comes tomorrow. As a nation, we'll be reminded
both of the great losses that came to us on 9/11 and of the progress
we've made in the last year.
This has been a period of testing for the United States. The American
people have met that test. We are united. We understand the threats
that have formed against us; we are determined to protect our country,
and we will prevail.
In this year of war, we've captured many terrorists, frozen the assets
of many terror groups and front organizations. Our people in law
enforcement and intelligence, working under the most urgent and
sometimes dangerous circumstances, have disrupted terrorist plots here
and abroad.
At home we are reorganizing the federal government to strengthen our
guard against further attacks. And, of course in Afghanistan, where so
many terrorists were housed, armed and trained, we've shut down the
camps, and liberated an entire nation from the Taliban regime.
For every bit of progress we've achieved, all of us appreciate that we
are still closer to the beginning of this war than to its end. 9/11
and its aftermath have given us a clear picture of the true ambitions
of the global terror network, as well as the growing danger of weapons
of mass destruction.
As we face this prospect, old doctrines of security simply do not
apply. In the days of the Cold War, we were able to manage the threat
with strategies of deterrence and containment. But it's a lot tougher
to deter enemies who have no country to defend. And containment is not
possible when dictators obtain weapons of mass destruction and are
prepared to share them with terrorists.
In that changing environment, as always, we must take the facts as
they are and think anew about the steps that will be necessary to
protect our country. In the case of Iraq, we have a regime that is
busy enhancing its capabilities in the field of chemical and
biological agents, and is, by all available evidence, speeding up its
nuclear weapons program.
Should all of Saddam Hussein's aggressive ambitions be realized, the
implications would be enormous, for the Middle East, for the United
States, and for the peace of the world. The whole range of weapons of
mass destruction then would rest in the hands of a dictator who has
already shown his willingness to use such weapons, and has done so,
both in his war with Iran and against his own people.
Armed with an arsenal of these weapons of terror, and sitting atop 10
percent of the world's oil reserves, Saddam Hussein could then be
expected to seek domination of the entire Middle East, take control of
a great portion of the world's energy supplies and directly threaten
America's friends throughout the region, and subject the United States
or any other nation to nuclear blackmail.
In the face of such a threat, we must proceed with care and
deliberation. Our administration is consulting with Congress and with
our friends and allies around the world about a course of action.
Prime Minister Blair was at Camp David this past weekend. The
President is also meeting this week with leaders from Europe, from
Asia and from Africa. On Thursday he'll speak to the U.N. General
Assembly, and make clear to the international community the kind of
challenges we must face together.
As he has said, time is not on our side. Deliverable weapons of mass
destruction in the hands of a terror network or a murderous dictator,
or the two working together, constitutes as grave a threat as can be
imagined. The entire world must know that the United States will take
whatever action is necessary to defend our freedom and our security.
All who seek justice and dignity and the chance to live their own
lives can know they have a friend and ally in the United States of
America. They can know this because the United States is a good and
decent and generous land. Americans are not a people who seek
vengeance or conquest. We fight for freedom and security, both for
ourselves and for others, and to build a future of greater peace and
prosperity.
History has called generations of Americans to defend our country and
defeat some of the gravest threats humanity has ever known. In
fighting global terror, we have accepted that duty once again, because
we know the cause is just and we understand that the hopes of the
civilized world depend on us.
Great decisions and challenges are still ahead. Yet Americans always
see the hopeful day to come. We will, in time, overcome the dangers to
our nation, and build a safer and better world beyond the war on
terror.
Thank you again for the chance to speak to you this evening. My
congratulations to Anne and Henry, and to CSIS for 40 years of
outstanding excellence.
Good night.
(end transcript)
(Distributed by the Office of International Information Programs, U.S.
Department of State. Web site: http://usinfo.state.gov)



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