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06 September 2002 Military News

Operations
Other Conflicts
Defense Policy / Programs
Defense Industry
News Reports

Current Operations

  • Kabul Bombing Targeted Innocents; TV Cameraman Dies in Helo Crash AFPS 06 Sept 2002-- Yesterday's deadly bombing in Kabul, Afghanistan, was a deplorable, deliberate act that targeted innocents to spread terror, a senior Pentagon spokesperson said here today.
  • PENTAGON / AFGHAN BOMBINGS VOA 06 Sept 2002-- U-S Defense officials say Thursday's bloody bombing attack in the Afghan capital of Kabul was intentionally designed to cause the maximum possible number of civilian casualties
  • KARZAI ATTACK VOA 06 Sept 2002-- Afghan President Hamid Karzai says his country is not slipping into chaos, following an assassination attempt against him and a bomb attack that killed more than 20 people on Thursday
  • PENTAGON/AFGHANISTAN VOA 06 Sept 2002-- U-S defense officials have sharply condemned Thursday's bloody bombing in Kabul, as well as the assassination attempt in Kandahar against Afghan leader Hamid Karzai

Other Conflicts

Defense Policy / Programs

  • NAVY SECRETARY ASSIGNS NEW SHIP NAME NEW YORK 6 Sept 2002 -- At a ceremony to be held Saturday, Sept. 7, at 9:30 a.m. aboard the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum in New York Harbor, Secretary of the Navy Gordon England will announce his decision to name the fifth ship of the San Antonio class of Amphibious Transport Dock ships, "New York," to honor the state, the city and the victims of Sept. 11. The Secretary will be joined by New York Gov. George Pataki and many other leaders from the city and state of New York
  • USS Charlotte (SSN 766) Homecoming COMSUBPAC News 06 Sept 2002-- Naval couple embrace at USS Charlotte's homecoming. The attack submarine returned to Pearl Harbor after a six-month deployment to the Western Pacific on Sept. 6th.
  • Defense Department Briefing Transcript Washington File 06 Sept 2002-- Clarke: Compared to what Afghanistan was like this time last year, it is a much better place. There are still problems, obviously. There are still going to be people who are killed. But it is a much more stable and secure place than it was. Afghan leaders were here a few weeks ago, and they attested to that, themselves, which I think is pretty powerful evidence. There will be problems for some time. You don't take a country that through what Afghanistan has gone through for the last 20 or 30 years and expect everything to be perfect in the short run.

Defense Industry

News Reports

  • Nation's Enemies Still Exist; Best Defense Is to Find Them AFPS 06 Sept 2002-- Even though nearly a year has passed since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, people must not forget that the nation's enemies still exist, President Bush said Sept. 5 in Louisville, Ky.
  • INDONESIA / MILITARY VOA 06 Sept 2002-- The Indonesian military's poor human rights record has drawn international criticism for years and caused a rift in relations with the United States. Now, cadets at Indonesian military academies learn about human rights, in an effort to improve the armed forces' reputation, and perhaps woo more aid from Washington
  • ATTACKS: AFGHANISTAN VOA 06 Sept 2002-- One country that was fundamentally changed in the aftermath of the September 11th attacks is Afghanistan. One year ago, it was ruled by Islamic radicals, the Taleban, who provided safe haven for the al-Qaida terrorist network blamed for the grisly attacks. Now it has a new interim government that is dedicated to establishing democracy.
  • AL QAIDA REORGANIZING? VOA 06 Sept 2002-- Afghanistan is no longer a safe haven for Osama bin Laden's terrorists. But al-Qaida is still a viable international terror network, operating in some sixty countries. Dutch officials arrested seven men at the beginning of September, accusing them of recruiting terrorists for al-Qaida. A draft United Nations report on al-Qaida's finances found that the terrorist network has built up its coffers with an infusion of tens of millions of dollars. According to the Washington Post, al-Qaida is continuing to sell heroin it stockpiled through years of controlling the Afghan drug trade. Al-Qaida reportedly has been buying gold with its drug money and shipping the bullion through Iran to hiding places in Sudan. C-N-N recently acquired video tapes made by al-Qaida of their operations in Afghanistan before the U-S-led coalition routed their hosts, the Taleban. The videos give some indication of al-Qaida capabilities and tactics. Among them is a video showing dogs being killed with poison gas. Is al-Qaida preparing to commit new atrocities?



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