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 DOT&E Director, Operational Test & Evaluation  
FY99 Annual Report
FY99 Annual Report

OBJECTIVE CREW SERVED WEAPON (OCSW)


Army ACAT III Program Prime Contractor
Total Number of Rounds:Over $1MPrimex
Total Program Cost (TY$):$1107M (Current POM) 
Average Unit Cost (TY$):$37K 
Full-rate production:FY07 


SYSTEM DESCRIPTION & CONTRIBUTION TO JOINT VISION 2010

The Objective Crew Served Weapon (OCSW) is to be the next generation crew served weapon replacing the current inventory of M2 (.50 caliber) and Mk 19 (40mm) machine guns. OCSW is expected to utilize a newly developed 25mm high explosive air bursting munition requiring a laser range finder, ballistic computer and sensor suite to enhance lethality and suppression capability The new capabilities of this weapon system will support precision engagement and dominant maneuver by dismounted forces in Joint Vision 2010.


BACKGROUND INFORMATION

This system constitutes the weapon sub-system portion of the Land Warrior program. As a result of the Live Fire Test Oversight for Small and Medium Caliber Ammunition Group's meetings, OCSW (specifically, the high explosive air bursting munition) was identified as an LFT&E candidate and placed under DOT&E oversight in December 1996


TEST & EVALUATION ACTIVITY

This program will enter Milestone I during 3QFY02. At Milestone I, this program will transition from Advanced Technology Demonstration status into EMD. There was little or no LFT&E activity for this weapon in FY99. An approved strategy for OSCW is expected to be included in the TEMP supporting Live Fire tests expected to occur in FY06 (for this program).

TEST & EVALUATION ASSESSMENT

A rough draft of the LFT&E strategy was reviewed by DOT&E in FY99. This strategy is similar to the Objective Individual Combat Weapon (OICW) which will precede the OCSW by 1-2 years.


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