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Lackland AFB, TX

Lackland AFB is located on the southwestern fringe of San Antonio and encompasses approximately 7,000 acres. It is home to the 37th Training Wing as the host installation command, and is flanked by the largest Associate, the 59th Medical Wing (i.e. Wilford Hall Medical Center).

Lackland's mission is to provide training for all non-prior service airmen of the regular Air Force, Air National Guard, and Air Force Reserve; provide modern operations training in the fields of cryptographic equipment maintenance, security and law enforcement, military working dog handler, combat arms, recruiting,supply, transportation, services, dietary and social actions. Lackland also provides students from 117 countries the opportunity to increase their proficiency in the English language through its Defense Language Institute English Language Center. Also, the Pararescue Indoctrination Course is conducted at Lackland.

Lackland AFB is named after Brigadier General Frank Lackland, who was commissioned into the regular Army after serving in the National Guard, District of Columbia. Construction on the base began on 15 June 1941, and was originally part of Kelly Field. One year later, it became an independent organization--the San Antonio Aviation Cadet Center. On 3 Feb 1948, the facility was named Lackland AFB.

As a result of the Korean War training populations, at Lackland, in the 1950s soared to 55,000 with only a maximum capacity of 25,000. Rapidly built wooden structures, built in 1941, to include the "Mobilization Open Bay" (MOB) dormitories, burst at the seams and forced the mass erection of a tent city. Temporary facilities, to include the "I" dormitories, were hastily erected as a quick fix to house the new recruits. Base operating support requirements force reactive planning, which often resulted in inadequate implementation.

During Vietnam, resourceful leaders split training shifts, increased flight sizes, and compressed training from 30 to 24 days to satisfy the urgency for military readiness. Training requirements also expanded to include teaching English to allied military members from foreign countries.

As a result of the contingencies of the 1950s and 60s, construction of permanent facilities, to include the 1,000 person steel and brick Recruit Housing and Training (RH&T) facilities for basic military training, cemented Lackland's training responsibilities. During the 1990s, Desert Storm revalidated our training value. Also, from the Cold War demise, base realignment and closure (BRAC) actions relocated several specialized training programs at Lackland.

In 1992, Lackland celebrated its fiftieth anniversary and also opened the doors for IAAFA's people and its training mission in the devastating aftermath of Hurricane Andrew. Air Education and Training Command emerged in 1993 under Air Force reorganization and relocated OTS to Maxwell AFB, Alabama.

BRAC 2005

Secretary of Defense Recommendations: Realign Lackland AFB, TX. It would relocate the Standard Air Munitions Package (STAMP)/Standard Tank, Rack, Adaptor, and Pylon Packages (STRAPP) function from Lackland Air Force Base, Medina Annex to McConnell AFB, KS, and transfer the mission to the Air National Guard

In its 2005 BRAC Recommendations, DoD recommended to realign Dane County Regional Air Guard Station/Truax Field, WI; Joe Foss Field Air Guard Station, SD; Des Moines Air Guard Station, IA; Fort Wayne Air Guard Station, IN; and Lackland Air Force Base, TX; by relocating baselevel F-110 intermediate maintenance to Capital, establishing a Centralized Intermediate Repair Facility (CIRF) at Capital for F110 engines.

DoD also recommended to close Niagara Falls Air Reserve Station (ARS), NY. It would realign the the 914th Airlift Wing's Civil Engineering Squadron to Lackland AFB, TX.

In another Recommendation, DoD recommended to realign Springfield-Beckley Municipal Airport AGS, OH. It would distribute the 178th Fighter Wing's F-16 aircraft to the 149th Fighter Wing (ANG), Lackland AFB, TX (six aircraft) and two other installations.

DoD also recommended to realign Lackland Air Force Base, TX, by relocating Culinary Training to Fort Lee, VA, establishing it as a Joint Center of Excellence for Culinary Training.

In another recommendation, DoD would realign Fort Sam Houston, TX, and Randolph AFB, TX, by relocating the installation management functions to Lackland AFB, TX.

In another recommendation, DoD would realign Lackland AFB, TX, by relocating the depot maintenance of Computers, Crypto, Electronic Components (Non-Airborne), and Radio to Tobyhanna Army Depot, PA; and disestablishing all depot maintenance capabilities.

In another recommendation, DoD recommended to realign Lackland AFB and two other installations by relocating Air & Space Information Systems Research and Development & Acquisition to Hanscom AFB, MA.

The ninth recommendation would realign Lackland Air Force Base, TX, by relocating the Transportation Management training to Fort Lee, VA.

Secretary of Defense Justifications: The first recommendation would enable Air Force Total Force participation by converting one of two Air Force STAMP/STRAPP missions from active duty to the Air National Guard. Lackland Air Force Base, Medina Annex was one of two STAMP mission locations within the Air Force; Hill Air Force Base, UT was the other. This action would still retain two geographically separated munitions sites to support the Air Force's Air Expeditionary Force construct, yet reduce the active duty manpower requirement. Current munitions out-load operations from Medina Annex to the airhead at Lackland (the former Kelly Air Force Base airfield) would pose transportation challenges in that explosives shipments would be moved over local and interstate highways, increasing the security threat. The Air Force did not fully control the Lackland airfield, thus access and future encroachment cannot be assured.

In the second recommendation, DoD claimed that establishing a CIRF at Capital would consolidate F110 engine intermediate maintenance for F-16 aircraft from five air reserve component units, and compliments other Air Force CIRF recommendations. The Capital CIRF would be centrally located in proximity to the serviced installations, and would utilize Capital's experienced people and existing facilities as part of an Air Force effort to standardize stateside and deployed intermediate-level maintenance concepts. Assuming no economic recovery, this recommendation could result in a maximum potential reduction of 9 jobs (5 direct jobs and 4 indirect jobs) over the 2006-2011 period in the San Antonio, TX, Metropolitan Statistical economic area (less than 0.1 percent).

The fourth recommendation distributes C-130 force structure to Little Rock (17-airlift), a base with higher military value. These transfers move C-130 force structure from the Air Force Reserve to the active duty, addressing a documented imbalance in the active/reserve manning mix for C-130s. Additionally, this recommendation distributes more capable KC-135R aircraft to Bangor (123), replacing the older, less capable KC-135E aircraft. Bangor supports the Northeast Tanker Task Force and the Atlantic air bridge.

DoD claimed that its fifth recommendation was made because Lackland (47) had higher military value than Springfield-Beckley (128). This recommendation also would optimizes the squadron size at Lackland, the only ANG F-16 Flying Training Unit.

The total estimated one-time cost to the Department of Defense to implement this recommendation would be $8.1M. The net of all costs and savings to the Department during the implementation period would be a savings of $4.7M. Annual recurring savings to the Department after implementation would be $2.9M, with a payback expected in two years. The net present value of the cost and savings to the Department over 20 years would be a savings of $32.4M. Assuming no economic recovery, this recommendation could result in a maximum potential reduction of 198 jobs (107 direct jobs and 91 indirect jobs) over the 2006-2011 period in the San Antonio, TX, Metropolitan Statistical economic area (less than 0.1 percent). include $0.02M in costs for environmental compliance and waste management.

This sixth recommendation would consolidate Culinary Training at the installation with the largest Service requirement, eliminate redundancy and costs, and train the Services culinary training under Inter-service Training Review Organization (ITRO). It was the military judgment of the JCSG that consolidation at the location with the largest amount of culinary training would produce the greatest overall military value to the Department, through increased training efficiency at a lower cost.

The total estimated one-time cost to the Department of Defense to implement this recommendation would be $5.0. The net of all costs and savings to the Department during the implementation period would be a cost of $2.9M. Annual recurring savings to the Department after implementation would be $1.4M with a payback expected in four years. The net present value of the costs and savings to the Department over 20 years would be a savings of $16.1M. Assuming no economic recovery, this recommendation could result in a maximum potential reduction of 471 jobs (291 direct jobs and 180 indirect jobs) over 2006-2011 in the San Antonio, TX, Metropolitan Statistical Area (less than 0.1 percent).

All installations employed military, civilian, and contractor personnel to perform common functions in support of installation facilities and personnel. All installations executed these functions using similar or near similar processes. Because these installations shared a common boundary with minimal distance between the major facilities or are in near proximity, there was significant opportunity to reduce duplication of efforts with resulting reduction of overall manpower and facilities requirements capable of generating savings, which would be realized by paring unnecessary management personnel and achieving greater efficiencies through economies of scale. Intangible savings would be expected to result from opportunities to consolidate and optimize existing and future service contract requirements. Additional opportunities for savings would also be expected to result from establishment of a single space management authority capable of generating greater overall utilization of facilities and infrastructure. Further savings would be expected to result from opportunities to reduce and correctly size both owned and contracted commercial fleets of base support vehicles and equipment consistent with the size of the combined facilities and supported populations. Regional efficiencies achieved as a result of Service regionalization of installation management would provide additional opportunities for overall savings as the designated installations are consolidated under regional management structures. The quantitative military value score validated by military judgment was the primary basis for determining which installation was designated as the receiving location.

The total estimated one time cost to the Department of Defense to implement this recommendation would be $10.2M. The net of all costs and savings to the Department during implementation period would be a cost of $0.07M. Annual recurring savings to the Department after implementation would be $2.9M with payback expected in 3 years. The net present value of the costs and savings to the Department over 20 years would be a saving of $28.0 M. Assuming no economic recovery, this recommendation could result in a maximum potential reduction of 376 jobs (177 direct jobs and 199 indirect jobs) over the 2006-2011 period in the San Antonio, TX, Metropolitan Statistical Area (less than 0.1 percent). This recommendation would require spending approximately $0.4M for environmental compliance activities.

This seventh recommendation would support depot maintenance function elimination at Lackland AFB and would follow the strategy of minimizing sites using maximum capacity at 1.5 shifts. This recommendation would eliminate over 36,200 square feet of depot maintenance production space with annual facility sustainment and recapitalization savings of $0.1M. Required capacity to support workloads and Core requirements for the Department of Defense (DoD) would be relocated to other DoD Centers of Industrial and Technical Excellence, thereby increasing the military value of depot maintenance performed at these sites. This recommendation would decrease the cost of depot maintenance operations across DoD by consolidation and elimination of 30 percent of duplicate overhead structures required to operate multiple depot maintenance activities. Additionally, this recommendation would support transformation of the Department's depot maintenance operations by increasing the utilization of existing capacity by 150 percent while maintaining capability to support future force structure. Another benefit of this recommendation included utilization of DoD capacity to facilitate performance of interservice workload.

The eighth recommendation would reduce the number of technical facilities engaged in Air & Space Sensors, Electronic Warfare, and Electronics and Information Systems RDAT&E from 6 to 2. Through this consolidation, the Department would increase efficiency of RDAT&E operations resulting, in a multi-functional center of excellence in the rapidly changing technology area of C4ISR. Assuming no economic recovery, this recommendation could result in a maximum potential reduction of 212 jobs (110 direct jobs and 102 indirect jobs) over the 2006-2011 period in the San Antonio, TX, Metropolitan Statistical Area (less than 0.1 percent).

The ninth recommendation would eliminate redundancy by consolidating like schools while preserving service-unique culture. Although Lackland Air Force Base, TX, has a higher military value than Fort Lee, VA, it is the military judgment of the JCSG that consolidation at the location with the largest amount of transportation training produces the greatest overall military value to the Department. Uses Inter-service Training Review Organization (ITRO) as the baseline.

Community Concerns: There were no formal expressions from the community.

Commission Findings: The Commission found that the military construction costs to realign the Standard Air Munitions Package (STAMP) and Standard Tank, Rack, Adaptor, and Pylon Package (STRAPP) at McConnell Air Force Base, KS were understated. Given this oversight, some critical military construction requirements might not be identified; and associated funding not programmed sufficiently to accommodate the storage of munitions at McConnell Air Force Base. The Commission also found an oversight in the recommendation that identified the departure of munitions personnel at Lackland Medina Annex in fiscal year 2007, yet the munitions stockpile is scheduled to be transported in fiscal year 2008. These concerns were identified to DoD who assured the Commission that adequate personnel would remain at Lackland Medina Annex until the mission was transferred. DoD also assured the Commission that any military construction shortfalls not identified would be resolved during site surveys at McConnell Air Force Base. Based on these assurances and the need to resolve the safety and security issues of transporting munitions over local and interstate highways at Lackland Medina as quickly as possible, the Commission concurred with this recommendation.

For the sixth recommendation the Commission's review and analysis confirmed the Secretary's recommendation and justification. The Commission's approval of this recommendation endorses the concept of centers of excellence as a means of enhancing jointness and promoting transformation. The Commission found, however, that the ultimate cost of this recommendation is still unclear. The Commission also found that after many years of previous consolidation with the Air Force, the Navy had begun making plans, prior to BRAC, to move its culinary training program from Lackland Air Force Base to Great Lakes Naval Base. The Navy cited differences in service-unique and cultural issues as the reason for de-consolidating culinary training. While the Commission's approval of DoD's recommendation will move the Navy's program to Fort Lee, the Commission cautions DoD to carefully implement the program to accommodate service-specific needs.

The Commission found no reason to disagree with the Secretary's ninth recommendation and justification. The Commission believes that locating all transportation management training at one location will provide significant joint benefits, enhance intra-service procedures, and reduce training duplication. The Commission also believes that course curriculums can be developed to provide service-unique training where necessary. In sum, the proposal was found to increase military value without posing undue risks of mission disruption.

Commission Recommendations: The Commission found the Secretary's first recommendation consistent with the final selection criteria and the Force Structure Plan. Therefore, the Commission approves the recommendation of the Secretary.

The Commission finds the Secretary's sixth recommendation consistent with the final selection criteria and the Force Structure Plan. Therefore, the Commission approves the recommendation of the Secretary.



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