Military


Atlantic City ANGB
Air Station Atlantic City
3927'45"N 7434'63"W

Atlantic City International (ACY) is located nine 9 miles northwest of Atlantic City. The Airport, which covers approximately 5,000 acres, is located near the Delilah Road exit, Interchange 9, of the Expressway. The national United States Sky Marshal program is headquartered near Atlantic City International Airport at the FAA William J. Hughes Technical Center as well as the US Coast Guard Station and New Jersey Air National Guard. The Airport's aviation services include scheduled air service and charter service as well as ground handling of aircraft, fueling, aircraft maintenance, parking, registration and collection of landing and parking fees through fixed-based operators.

The FAA's William J. Hughes Technical Center is the agency's key research, development, test and evaluation facility. The aviation research activities conducted at the Technical Center focus on air traffic management, communications, navigation and surveillance, airports, aircraft safety and aviation security. At any one time, over 100 projects are under way. The Center's unique facilities include: air traffic control laboratories and an air traffic simulation facility; a human factors laboratory; weather laboratories; a fleet of specially instrumented aircraft, or "Flying laboratories," ranging in size from small planes to helicopters and large transports; the world's largest full-scale aviation fire test facility; a chemistry laboratory; an impact test facility; radar test laboratories; the National Airport Pavement Test Facility; an aviation security laboratory and much more.

Atlantic City is located on Absecon Island in Atlantic County. It is approximately 60 miles southeast of Philadelphia and about 100 miles south, southwest of New York. Located in the heart of the northeast and within easy driving distance of a third of the population of the United States, Atlantic City is convenient to get to and convenient to get around in. The resort is readily accessible by air through two nearby International Airports or by car and bus along three major highways. The Atlantic City International Airport is located just minutes from the city and offers shuttle, taxi and rental car transportation.

With more than 33 million people visiting every year, Atlantic City, New Jersey has become one of America's most popular destination. "America's Favorite Playground" has 12 casinos offering 24-hour non-stop action, world-class headline entertainers, bright sandy beaches, a 4 1/2 mile amusement-filled Boardwalk, championship golf courses, tennis, charter boat fishing, sailing, restaurants to please any dining choice, historic sites, the Miss America Pageant, natural attractions, shopping and beach resort recreation.

Air Station Atlantic City provides search and rescue service to the Atlantic coastal regions from Connecticut to Virginia. Air Station Cape May's and Air Station Brooklyn's operational responsibilities overlapped in that region, and the Coast Guard decided the same level of coverage would be maintained by consolidating the two air stations into one facility.

Group-Air Station Atlantic City in its present form is the result of a Coast Guard aviation streamlining initiative to realign unit location with the capabilities of today's modern aircraft. Air Station Brooklyn, New York and Group-Air Station Cape May, New Jersey resources were combined at the newly constructed $13 million facility at Atlantic City International Airport, which opened June 8, 1998.

Group-Air Station Atlantic City became operational 18 May, 1998. The Group is located at the William J. Hughes Federal Aviation Administration Technical Center at the Atlantic City International Airport, New Jersey. The station coordinates operations, including over 2000 search and rescue cases annually.

One of Air Station Atlantic City's seven HH-65s maintains a Coast Guard presence in the Brooklyn area, operating out of Air Facility Long Island, N.Y., at the Frances S. Gabreski Airport.

Located at the Atlantic City International Airport, adjacent to the Federal Aviation Administration's William J. Hughes Technical Center, 10 miles west of the famous boardwalk, Coast Guard Group/Air Station Atlantic City began operations May 18 and was formally unveiled at a grand opening ceremony 08 June 1998. Steel framing and initial block work began to take shape at the new air station in September 1997. Construction of the $12.3 million, 63,000-square-foot facility started after the official groundbreaking ceremony Oct. 21, 1996. The project, designed by Lev Zetlin Associates of New York and constructed by C-Pyramid Enterprises of Robinsville, N.J., was directed by the Coast Guard Facilities Design and Construction Center in Norfolk, Va.

The L-shaped floor plan is designed with the air station's operations and maintenance control centers centrally located between the ready hangar and maintenance hangar for convenient access to each. A space-saving feature of Air Station Atlantic City is the hangar doors. Three collapsible doors enclose each of the hangars' 142-foot openings. Most of your traditional hangars have huge sliding doors that take up a lot of the square footage of the building. With this facility, the door is stored overhead and out of the way. The hangar door supports swing up and you end up with a wide-open hangar bay. Included in the hangar construction is a 2-ton overhead crane rail on the maintenance side used for servicing helicopters and four, 2,000-gallon Aqueous Film-Forming Foam tanks with the capacity to douse both hangars twice in the event of a fire.

The first lifesaving stations along the New Jersey coastline were built in 1849 in response to a rash of deadly shipping accidents. The term "Group" was first coined in reference to this string of lifesaving stations from Barnegat to Cape May, New Jersey. In 1969, Cape May became a Group-Air Station when three helicopters were stationed there under the command of the Group Commander. Originally, organized into two separate group offices based in Atlantic City and Cape May, these command structures were combined in 1982.

BRAC 2005

Secretary of Defense Recommendation: Realign Lambert-St. Louis International Airport Air Guard Station, St. Louis, MO. The 131st Fighter Wing's F-15s (15 aircraft) will distribute to the 57th Fighter Wing, Nellis Air Force Base, NV (nine aircraft), and 177th Fighter Wing, Atlantic City International Airport Air Guard Station, NJ (six aircraft). Realign Atlantic City International Airport Air Guard Station, NJ. The 177th Fighter Wing's F-16s will be distributed to the 158th Fighter Wing, Burlington International Airport Air Guard Station, VT (three aircraft), and retire (12 aircraft). The wing's expeditionary combat support (ECS) elements will remain in place. Firefighter positions move to Scott Air Force Base, IL. The 157 Air Operations Group (AOG) and the 218th Engineering Installation Group (EIG) will relocate from Jefferson Barracks geographically separated unit (GSU) into
space at Lambert International. Jefferson Barracks real property accountability will transfer to the Army.

In another recommendation, DoD recommended to realign Portland IAP AGS, OR. It would realign the 142d Fighter Wing (ANG) by distributing the wing's F-15 aircraft to the 177th Fighter Wing (ANG), Atlantic City, NJ (six aircraft) and another installation. This recommendation would realign Portland's F-15 fighter aircraft to an installation of higher military value. Atlantic City (61) ranked higher than Portland (77) for the fighter mission, and realigning Portland's F-15 aircraft to Atlantic City would help to create an optimum-sized fighter squadron (24 Primary Aircraft Assigned). Although the ANG would continue to support an alert commitment at Portland, the Air Force determined it was also a priority to support North American Defense Command (NORAD) and United States Northern Command (USNORTHCOM) air sovereignty alert requirements at Atlantic City and New Orleans. Creating effective sized squadrons at these reserve component locations would ensure the Air Force could maintain trained, experienced pilots and maintenance technicians, and would be able to fulfill its Homeland Defense alert requirements.

Secretary of Defense Justification: The Air Force distributed reserve component F-15C force structure to bases with higher military value than Otis (88) and Lambert-St. Louis (127). The F-15C aircraft are realigned to Nellis (13), Jacksonville Air Guard Station (24), and Atlantic City Air Guard Station (61). The Nellis bound aircraft will help form an enhanced aggressor squadron for Operation RED FLAG, and the Atlantic City bound aircraft will provide expanded capability for the homeland defense mission.

Community Concerns: The Atlantic City New Jersey community supported DoD's proposal to expand and convert the 177th Fighter Wing, claiming its strategic location permits unparalleled air superiority coverage over five major US cities. New York City, in particular, can be reached within seven minutes of takeoff. The community was confident it could transfer to a new aircraft type, citing its 98.9 percent endstrength, very high Fully Mission Capable Rates, nearby training ranges, and modern infrastructure. Last, it expressed concern about retiring and relocating existing aircraft without first receiving new replacement aircraft from Otis and St. Louis.

Commission Findings: The Commission found that the Department of Defense recommendation to close Otis Air National Guard Base, and realign Lambert St. Louis International Airport Air Guard Station and Atlantic City Air Guard Station should be supported in concept, but with modifications for homeland defense reasons. Despite community concerns related to Otis and Lambert, the Commission agreed with the removal of F-15 aircraft from both locations. The Commission urges the Secretary of Defense to consult with the Secretary of the Department of homeland security and the Commandant, United States Coast Guard to minimize any impact of Otis' closure on the operations of the Coast Guard. The Commission establishes an F-15 wing at Jacksonville, FL, an F-16 wing at Atlantic City, NJ, and an F-16 wing at Burlington, VT, consistent with the Commission's Air National Guard and Reserve Laydown.

This recommendation directing aircraft movement and personnel actions in connection with Air National Guard installations and organizations is designed to support the Future Total Force. The Commission expects that the Air Force will find new missions where needed, provide retraining opportunities, and take appropriate measures to limit possible adverse personnel impact. The Commission's intent is that the Air Force will act to assign sufficient aircrew and maintenance personnel to units gaining aircraft in accordance with current, established procedures. However, the Commission expects that all decisions with regard to manpower authorizations will be made in consultation with the governor of the state in which the affected Air National Guard unit is located. Any manpower changes must be made under existing authorities, and must be made consistent with existing limitations. Some reclassification of existing positions may be necessary, but should not be executed until the Air Force and the state have determined the future mission of the unit to preclude unnecessary personnel turbulence. This recommendation is consistent with the Commission's Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve Laydown Plan.

Commission Recommendations: The Commission found that the Secretary of Defense deviated substantially from final selection criterion 1, as well as from the Force Structure Plan. Therefore, the Commission recommends the following:

Realign Otis ANGB, MA. Distribute the fifteen F-15 aircraft assigned to the 102d Fighter Wing's (ANG) to meet the Primary Aircraft Authorizations (PAA) requirements established by the Base Closure and Realignment recommendations of the Secretary of Defense, as amended by the Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commission. The 253d Combat Communications Group, and 267th Communications Squadron will remain in place at Otis, with 104th Fighter Wing at Barnes providing administrative support as the parent wing. An air sovereignty alert (ASA) facility will be constructed at Barnes Municipal Airport Air Guard Station, MA. Firefighter positions from Otis will move to Barnes Municipal Airport Air Guard Station, MA.

If the Commonwealth of Massachusetts decides to change the organization, composition and location of the 102d Fighter Wing (ANG) to integrate the unit into the Future Total Force, all other personnel allotted to the 102d Fighter Wing (ANG) will remain in place and assume a mission relevant to the security interests of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and consistent with the integration of the unit into the Future Total Force, including but not limited to air mobility, C4ISR, Information Operations, engineering, flight training or unmanned aerial vehicles. Where appropriate, unit personnel will be retrained in skills relevant to the emerging mission.

This recommendation does not effect a change to the authorized end-strength of the Massachusetts Air National Guard. The distribution of aircraft currently assigned to the 102d Fighter Wing (ANG) is based upon a resource-constrained determination by the Department of Defense that the aircraft concerned will better support national security requirements in other locations and is not conditioned upon the agreement of the commonwealth.

Realign Lambert-St. Louis International Airport Air Guard Station, St. Louis, MO. Distribute the fifteen F-15 aircraft assigned to the 131st Fighter Wing to meet the Primary Aircraft Authorizations (PAA) requirements established by the Base Closure and Realignment recommendations of the Secretary of Defense, as amended by the Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commission. The 157th Air Operations Group (AOG) and the 218th Engineering Installation Group (EIG) will relocate from Jefferson Barracks geographically separated unit (GSU) into space at Lambert International. Jefferson Barracks real property accountability will transfer to the Army.

If the State of Missouri decides to change the organization, composition and location of the 131st Fighter Wing (ANG) to integrate the unit into the Future Total Force, all other personnel allotted to the 131st Fighter Wing (ANG) will remain in place and assume a mission relevant to the security interests of the State of Missouri and consistent with the integration of the unit into the Future Total Force, including but not limited to air mobility, C4ISR, Information Operations, engineering, flight training or unmanned aerial vehicles. Where appropriate, unit personnel will be retrained in skills relevant to the emerging mission.

This recommendation does not effect a change to the authorized end-strength of the Missouri Air National Guard. The distribution of aircraft currently assigned to the 131st Fighter Wing (ANG) is based upon a resource-constrained determination by the Department of Defense that the aircraft concerned will better support national security requirements in other locations and is not conditioned upon the agreement of the state.

Establish 18 PAA F-15 aircraft at the 125th Fighter Wing, Jacksonville International Airport Air Guard Station, Florida (ANG);

Establish 18 PAA F-16 aircraft at the 177th Fighter Wing, Atlantic City International Airport Air Guard Station, New Jersey (ANG);

Establish 18 PAA F-16 aircraft at the 158th Fighter Wing, Burlington International Airport Air Guard Station, Vermont (ANG).

The Commission found that this change and the recommendation as amended are consistent with the final selection criteria and the Force Structure Plan. The full text of this and all Commission recommendations can be found in Appendix Q.



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