The Largest Security-Cleared Career Network for Defense and Intelligence Jobs - JOIN NOW

Military


136th Air Refueling Squadron [136th ARS]

The 136th Air Refueling Squadron is the flying unit of the 107th Air Refueling Wing.

The 136th ARS traces its origins to the 482nd BS (Dive), which was constituted and activated at Hunter Field in August 1943. Deployed on the European Front in England during World War II, the squadron was assigned to the 339th FG, as part of Eighth Air Force. The squadron inactivated upon its return to the United States in November 1945 at Drew Field, FL.

The squadron was reconstituted as the 136th Fighter Squadron and assigned to the New York NAtional Guard before being federally recognized at NAS Niagara Falls, NY, on December 8, 1948.

As a result of the Korean War, the squadron was called to active duty on March 1, 1951 and assigned to Air Defense Command. It returned to state control in december of 1952.

The squadron was again called to active duty as a result of the Berlin Crisis but did not deploy overseas, remaining stationed at its home base. The 136th was again called to active duty as a result of the Pueblo incident in 1968. The squadron deployed this time to Tuy Hoa AB, Vitenam in June 1968 before returning to the United States and to state control a year later.

Redesignated as the 136th Fighter Interceptor Squadron, the squadron was reassigned to Tactical Air COmmand in April 1980. The squadron converted to the F-16A/B in 1990, later upgrading to the ADF version.

The 136th was redesignated as the 136th Fighter Squadron on March 15, 1992, and came under the authority of Air Combat Command. Two years later, the squadron was reassigned to Air Mobility Command and transitioned to the KC-135R as part of change in the mission of the unit to an air refueling one.

The 136th ARS flies KC-135R modified with the Pacer CRAG, a glass cockpit which reduces the nunmber of crewmembers to three by eliminating the navigator position.



NEWSLETTER
Join the GlobalSecurity.org mailing list


One Billion Americans: The Case for Thinking Bigger - by Matthew Yglesias


 
Page last modified: 05-07-2011 02:09:27 ZULU