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FM 34-2-1: TTPs For Reconnaissance And Surveillance And Intelligence Support To Counterreconnaissance

CHAPTER 8

AUGMENTING OR TASK ORGANIZING RECONNAISSANCE AND SURVEILLANCE MISSIONS

Data gathered from different training exercises and the training centers indicate maneuver battalions typically overuse the scouts. Very often the scout platoon is the only R&S asset actively collecting on the battlefield. This usually results in a dead scout platoon, and many unanswered PIR. To increase the effectiveness of the scout platoon, other R&S assets, and the overall collection capability, you should augment or task organize as many R&S missions as possible.

Augmenting and task organizing are two different concepts that strive for the same end result. In this field manual, the term "augmenting" is used to describe using numerous assets at the same time to support the R&S plan. You task with independent or dual R&S missions to augment the R&S effort; units are not augmented.

There are circumstances in which you do not want to place R&S assets under C2 of some of your subordinate units; you or the S3 want to maintain control of these assets to task or move them quickly without disrupting the other units.

There may be times when you or the S3 want R&S assets under the C2 of subordinate units. Both of these concepts--augmenting and task organizing--can be used to implement productive R&S plans. The following examples provide augmented or task organized R&S missions and what each accomplishes.

TASK ORGANIZED WITH ENGINEERS AND ARTILLERY FORWARD OBSERVERS ATTACHED TO RECONNAISSANCE PATROL

In this example you want to deny or confirm enemy activity at NAI 1 and to check on obstacles and booby traps along the road. You also want to see if the enemy has begun to prepare a possible fording site at NAI 2. Based on key intelligence you have provided, the S3 decides to send a mounted patrol for this mission. To increase mission effectiveness, the S3 also attaches some engineers and artillery FOs. Figure 8-1 is a sample R&S task organization with engineers and artillery FOs attached to reconnaissance patrol.

The engineers will be able to inform you of tampered-with obstacles and adjusted roadside booby traps. The FOs will be able to call for indirect fire if the patrol finds any prepared fording or bridging sites along the river. In this example you have three elements, each complementing the overall effectiveness of the reconnaissance mission. The reconnaissance element must receive instructions to clear, mark, breach, and/or bypass instructions before mission execution.

TASK ORGANIZED WITH SIGNAL ASSETS, OBSERVATION POST, AND FORWARD OBSERVERS ATTACHED TO EXTENDED RECONNAISSANCE PATROL

Figure 8-2 is a sample task organization with signal assets, OPs, and FOs attached to extended reconnaissance patrol. In this example you have a reconnaissance patrol conducting a zone reconnaissance in Zone Buck. Due to the extended range of the patrol and the terrain, radio communications will not reach from Zone Buck to the TOC. You also have two NAI, 4 and 7, needing surveillance during a particular time window. NAI 4 is a high speed avenue of approach exiting the battalion to the north. AI and NAI 7 is a road intersection. To augment this patrol you have a signal retransmission element, OP, and artillery FOs attached to the patrol.

The retransmission element enables the reconnaissance patrol to report what is in Zone Buck; the OP and FO enable you to have surveillance of the NAI; and the FO allows you to interdict any targets moving along the NAI or the roads.

SCOUTS WITH INFANTRY

In this example your battalion is preparing to conduct a raid on Objective Bear. The terrain along the river consists of thick forests. You only have two hours to reconnoiter from the LD to the objective and to mark infiltration routes. You and the S3 decide to task organize this mission with the scout platoon and two infantry platoons. Figure 8-3 is a sample of R&S task organization with scout and infantry platoons.

The scout platoon leader is the reconnaissance commander for this particular mission. The battalion has cross-trained one of the infantry platoons as the backup scout platoon. The scout platoon and the backup platoon mark crossing sites and infiltration routes while the other infantry platoon provides security. Once the scout platoon has marked the routes, they dismount and reconnoiter Objective Bear while the two infantry platoons provide security.

D COMPANY, SCOUT PLATOON, AND GROUND SURVEILLANCE RADAR EFFORT AUGMENTED

Figure 8-4 is a sample of an augmented R&S platoon mission. In this example your battalion is in the defense and has tasked Company D to conduct a route reconnaissance and provide surveillance of NAI 3 for four hours. The scout platoon is conducting a screen in the north. Two GSRs are providing surveillance of the flanks. Each asset is conducting an independent R&S effort. This particular mission concept allows you or the S3 to move or assign additional missions to these assets with minimal disruption to the entire battalion.



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