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Iran Press TV

China rejects allegations of meddling in Australia affairs

Iran Press TV

Monday, 25 November 2019 3:23 PM

China says it has never been interested in meddling in the internal affairs of other countries amid claims that the Chinese Communist party sought to infiltrate Australia's parliament.

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Geng Shuang said at a daily news briefing on Monday that some Australian media outlets had fabricated such allegations as China's interference.

Some Australian politicians, organizations, and media, the official added, had "become seized with imaginary fears" on issues related to China.

"They constantly fabricate cases of so-called Chinese spies infiltrating Australia."

"However bizarre the story, lies are still lies in the end, whatever new guise they wear."

The allegations, first aired by local network Nine, claim that a suspected Chinese espionage ring approached a Chinese-Australian man to run as a member of parliament.

The channel report alleged that Chinese operatives offered one million dollars to Liberal party member Nick Zhao to run for federal parliament in the Melbourne suburban seat of Chisholm, now held by Hong Kong-born Liberal lawmaker Gladys Liu.

Zhao was found dead in a Melbourne hotel room after he reportedly approached the Australian Security Intelligence Organization (ASIO) to discuss the plot.

On Sunday, Australia's 60 Minutes program and affiliated newspapers said a suspected Chinese espionage ring had offered money to pay for a Melbourne luxury car dealer to run for a seat in the federal parliament.

The ASIO said it was investigating an alleged plot by China to install an agent in the parliament.

Following the report on Sunday, the ASIO director general, Mike Burgess, said the domestic spy agency "was previously aware of matters that were reported today, and has been actively investigating them."

Describing the alleged plot as "deeply disturbing and troubling," Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison said the government was determined to protect Australians from foreign interference and had bolstered laws to strengthen the powers of intelligence agencies.

However, he said he would not draw conclusions on an alleged Chinese plot.

The episode involving China and Australia comes at a time of friction between the West and Beijing.

China's Foreign Minister Wang Yi recently minced no words when he lashed out at the United States over Washington's one-sided approach to world politics and its adversarial attitude towards Beijing.

"It (the US) has already become the world's biggest destabilizing factor," China's Foreign Ministry cited the top diplomat as saying on the sidelines of a Group of 20 ministerial meeting in the city of Nagoya in southern Japan on Saturday.



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