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State Dept: US Will Require Chinese Diplomats to Report Contacts With American Officials, Educators

Sputnik News

22:13 16.10.2019(updated 22:45 16.10.2019)

US State Department officials stated on Wednesday that moving forward, Chinese diplomats will have to give advance notice of any meetings with state, local and municipal officials, including those with research and educational institutions.

Reuters reported that the change was made in an effort to "add reciprocity" to the manner in which American diplomats are required to do business in China.

​Additionally, the measure will cover all staff involved in Chinese missions within the US and Chinese officials traveling through the country on official business.

Citing State Department officials, AP reported that unlike China's requirements for American diplomats, the US' rules are "less onerous than China's because the Chinese must approve such contacts." The Trump administration will not be requiring Chinese diplomats to receive prior approval ahead of planned meetings.

Department officials have reportedly already received one notice from Chinese officials.

The latest development comes days after the Trump administration issued visa restrictions on Chinese officials, citing ongoing abuses of Muslim minorities in China's Xinjiang region. That move was promptly followed by Beijing stating it would mirror the US' stance in turn.

Both China and the US have been engaged in a months-long tit-for-tat, mostly regarding the pair's ongoing trade disputes, in which the Trump administration seeks to obtain a so-called level playing field. Recently, US President Donald Trump announced that the US and China had reached a "very substantial phase one" trade deal. Per POTUS, the fresh agreement indicates Beijing will "start buying very large quantities of our Agricultural Product."

Sputnik



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