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Deadly Nerve Agent Novichok Is A Decades-Old Cold War Foe

March 12, 2018

Novichok, the powerful nerve agent that British Prime Minister Theresa May says was used in the attack on former Russian spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter, Yulia, means "newcomer" in Russian. But the military grade chemical is anything but.

Developed in the former Soviet Union in the 1970s and 1980s, novichoks are a group of advanced nerve agents designed to circumvent chemical weapons treaties and penetrate protective gear used by NATO forces.

They are made of two non-toxic components that become lethal only when mixed together, making them difficult to detect and relatively safe and easy to transport and store. Once mixed, however, they are believed to be 5 to 8 times more potent than the notorious nerve agent VX.

Dan Kaszeta, a London-based expert in chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear defense (CBRN) said on Twitter that novichoks were "specifically developed to evade the West/NATO's detection capabilities and foil intelligence collection efforts."

While Russia has vehemently denied any connection to the attack, which has left the 66-year-old Skripal and his 33-year-old daughter in a "critical but stable condition" at a Salisbury hospital after being exposed to the chemical on March 4.

'Enough To Kill Tens Of Millions'

Novichoks gained notoriety in the early 1990s when Soviet scientist Vil Mirzayanov revealed that the country had secretly developed the powerful binary nerve gas that is believed to take effect rapidly by penetrating through the skin and respiratory system.

Mirzayanov, a chemist, told The New York Times in 1994 that the Russian stockpile of chemical weapons, some 60,000 tons, "would be enough to kill tens of millions."

Colonel Hamish de Bretton-Gordon, the former head of Britain's Chemical, Biological, Radiation, and Nuclear regiment told the Daily Express that novichoks are "designed to be undetectable for any standard chemical security testing."

"Skripal would only have needed to touch it, as he opened a parcel, for it to be absorbed into his bloodstream," he said.

Since novichoks were not developed in large quantities, de Bretton-Gordon said the Russians may have only enough of them to kill several hundred thousand people.

He also warned that there could be hidden costs as well for those who come into contact with it such as "mutations in the next generation or future generations."

The effects of novichoks are similar to other nerve agents.

It is believed that they attack muscles, especially around the heart and lungs, causing the collapse of body functions, including respiratory and cardiac arrest.

With reporting by The Independent, , Daily Express, Daily Mirror, and The New York Times

Source: https://www.rferl.org/a/novichok-skripal- poisoning-explainer/29095012.html

Copyright (c) 2018. RFE/RL, Inc. Reprinted with the permission of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, 1201 Connecticut Ave., N.W. Washington DC 20036.



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