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Iran Press TV

Rogue agents behind Argentine prosecutor's death: Buenos Aires

Iran Press TV

Sat Jan 24, 2015 4:44PM

Argentina says rogue agents from its own intelligence services were behind the death of the prosecutor of the 1994 AMIA bombing case.

Alberto Nisman, the lead investigator into the 1994 attack on a Jewish center in Argentina in 1994, was found dead in his apartment late on January 18.

The initial police report said Nisman had died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound.

President Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, however, said in a statement posted on her Facebook page on Thursday that the prosecutor's death was not a suicide.

Nisman's death happened hours before he was to testify before Congress on Monday about his allegation that President Fernandez conspired to derail his investigation of the attack.

The government claims the prosecutor's allegations and his death were linked to a power struggle at the Latin American country's intelligence agency and agents who had recently been fired.

"When he was alive they needed him to present the charges against the president. Then, undoubtedly, it was useful to have him dead," the president's chief of staff, Anibal Fernandez, said Friday.

Under intense political pressure imposed by Israel, Argentina formerly accused Iran of having carried out the 1994 bombing attack on the AMIA building. AMIA stands for the Asociacion Mutual Israelita Argentina or the Argentine Israelite Mutual Association.

Iran has categorically and consistently denied any involvement in the terrorist bombing.

In January 2013, Tehran and Buenos Aires signed a memorandum of understanding to jointly probe the 1994 bombing.

AR/HMV/SS



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