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Forward Based X-Band Transportable (FBX-T) Radar
AN/TPY-2 / TPS-X / Forward Deployable Radar (FDR)

The National Team brought to the program several major improvements, including: system-level integration of our command and control network; adoption of an integrated architecture approach to deal with countermeasures; development of a capability-requirement for forward-based sensors, such as the Forward Deployable Radar and the Sea-Based X-Band Radar; and identification of initial architecture trades for the boost/ascent phase intercept mission.

The BMDS Radars Project will significantly enhance BMDS effectiveness by expanding the battlespace. The project includes the Forward Based X-Band Radar-Transportable (FBX-T) a land based component, but will have potential for a sea based configuration. The FBX-T Radar will provide early detection, tracking, and discrimination of threat missiles, providing data to the BMDS sensor network. The Forward Based Radar project will evaluate advanced algorithms and prototype the interfaces to the BMDS C2BMC using the TPS-X radar.

As of early 2005 plans called for the initial FBX-T Radar to be available in CY 2005. Contract options for two additional FBX-T radars will be exercised in FY 2005. These additional radars will be integrated into the BMDS as Block 2006 and Block 2008 assets. Evolving radar configurations will use additional algorithms and provide enhanced capabilities to support the BMDS. Beginning in FY 2006 the Forward Based Radar initiative will provide for continued sensor evolution to improve the capabilities for a BMDS configuration(s) for Block 2008 and beyond.

Acquisition of one FBX-T #1 radar was initiated in FY 2003 for delivery in FY 2005 with search and track functionality. On 07 April 2003 the US Missile Defense Agency awarded Raytheon Company a $350 million sole source contract to engineer, construct, integrate and test a forward deployable Ballistic Missile Defense System (BMDS) radar. This award results from President Bush's direction to begin fielding initial missile defense capabilities in 2004-2005. The BMDS radar will be a transportable, X-band, phased array radar with sufficient sensitivity to detect, track and discriminate threat missiles.

Raytheon will leverage existing technology from its open architecture-based family of radars which includes the Theater High Altitude Area Defense radar, the Ground Based Radar-Prototype, the Sea Based X-band radar, and the sea based High Power Discrimination radar. The design, development, manufacturing and integration work on the BMDS radar is one of IDS's key competencies. IDS provides the cutting-edge systems integration solutions that make missile defense a reality. Work on the new forward deployable radar will be performed at Raytheon facilities in Andover, Bedford, Sudbury and Tewksbury, Mass.

The Ballistic Missile Defense System will deploy forward based radars (both land and sea-based) to enhance the system's capability by adding robustness against a wide range of threats and providing support for increased protection. The radars will be capable of detecting ballistic missiles early in their flight and will provide precise tracking information for use by the missile defense system. This approach provides overlapping sensor coverage, the potential to extend the Ballistic Missile Defense System battle space, and the ability to complicate an enemy's ability to penetrate the defense system.

The FBX-T is a high-resolution, X-band, phased array radar based upon the Terminal High Altitude Area Defense Radar (THAAD) hardware and software design. This commonality allowed for the accelerated procurement and development of a forward based capability. FBX-T will include modified software algorithms for tracking and discrimination from a forward-based perspective. The radar will have a direct interface with the BMDS command and control system. The radar will perform surveillance autonomously or as cued by other sensors, and it will acquire, track and discriminate threat missiles and missile components, and pass this information to other BMDS tracking, discrimination, and fire control radars downstream.

These high-resolution, X-band class, phased array radars will acquire, track, discriminate, classify, identify, and estimate the trajectory parameters of threat missiles and missile components, and pass this information to other Ballistic Missile Defense System tracking, discrimination, and fire control radars downstream.

The land-based FBX-T is designed to be air transportable, roll-on/roll-off ship transportable, and rail transportable. The radar consists of a solid-state, phased-array antenna supported by an electronics unit and a cooling unit. Acquire generators, a radar support trailer, and two supply containers also are part of the deployable radar. They are transportable by air, ship and rail. They also deployed with command and control interface, a radar support trailer, two to three generators, and two supply containers. Host command or host nation will provide Force Protection.

The forward based radars, coupled with layered sensors, give the Ballistic Missile Defense System a continuous tracking and discrimination capability with more shot opportunities to engage the target, resulting in a greater probability for a successful hit. The radars will pass target data to the command and control system for use by the midcourse and terminal sensors. It performs autonomously or as cued by other sensors.

The BMDS is deploying forward based radars that support a layered sensor architecture. The Forward Based X-Band Radar-Transportable (FBX-T) will provide a capability to detect ballistic missiles early in their flight and provide precise tracking information for use by the BMDS. This approach provides overlapping sensor coverage and the potential for BMDS weapons to extend their effective range beyond local sensors by using more sophisticated engagement strategies. This will enhance the capability of the BMDS to defend the United States and allies, friends, and deployed forces from ballistic missiles of all ranges in all phases of flight.

Three forward deployed radars will be developed and deployed to protect the United States from Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles and medium range threats. The forward deployed radars will deliver an initial search and track capability at the beginning of fiscal year 2006. Discrimination enhancements will be added in late 2006.

On May 13, 2004 the House Armed Services Committee recommended $536 million ($56 million less than the Administration's request) for sensors. The reduction reflected the committee's concerns with the projected costs of the Forward Deployable Radar (FDR) since the FDR program uses radar technology already developed for the Terminal High Altitude Area Defense system.

The Missile Defense Agency has a requirement for Contractor Logistics Support (CLS) for the operation and maintenance of up to four Forward Deployable Radars (FDR) in support of the Ballistic Missile Defense System (BMDS). Under this effort, the contractor shall provide all operations and sustainment support that will include: radar operation, site survey and engineering services, preventative and corrective maintenance, administrative and physical security, spare parts, and personnel. The period of performance of this contract consists of a five-year base period. Operational sites had not been determined, but will consist of OCONUS locations.

On 08 June 2005 Raytheon Company was awarded a contract by the Missile Defense Agency (MDA) for Contractor Logistics Support (CLS) of the Ballistic Missile Defense System (BMDS) radars. The contract has a potential value of $260 million over the five-year period of performance.

Under the innovative contract, Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems (IDS) will be responsible for operating and maintaining Forward Based X-Band Transportable (FBX-T) radars as part of the Missile Defense Agency's BMDS. The CLS contract covers all operations and sustainment of the forward based radars, including site surveys and site preparation; operational readiness certification; site operation and maintenance; mission preparation and support; radar performance reporting and analysis; depot support; and administrative and physical security. Under this contract, Raytheon will provide the warfighter with "no doubt" reliability, ensuring that these radars work.

The BMDS Radar CLS contract award underscored Raytheon's role as a mission systems integrator providing solutions in missile defense. Raytheon IDS was awarded a BMDS Radar contract by the MDA in April 2003 and delivered the first FBX-T radar under budget and ahead of schedule in November 2004. The FBX-T is a high-power, transportable X-Band radar designed to track ballistic missiles in the boost and post-boost phases of flight.

The deployment and networking of additional sensors supports the MDA goal of using a layered sensor architecture to provide a more robust BMDS. Target tracking and eventually discrimination will be performed by upgrades to an existing Large X-Band Dish radar and procurement of two smaller X-Band Dish Radars to be used in conjunction with FBX-T radars. Pairing the FBX-T radars with X-Band Dish Radars (depending on the region being covered) significantly increases the amount of time available for tracking and eventually discrimination. This strategy along with upgrading an existing Large X-Band Dish Radar will eliminate discrimination gaps for most missile trajectories emanating from specific rogue nations, and thereby increasing BMDS effectiveness.

The FBX-T's will provide BMDS precise acquisition and tracking information on ballistic missiles from boost into midcourse, providing the potential for BMDS weapons to extend their effective range beyond local sensors by using more sophisticated engagement strategies. The extended coverage provided by the adjunct dish radars will further enhance the capability of the BMDS to defend the United States and our allies, friends, and deployed forces from ballistic missiles of all ranges in all phases of flight.

The AN/TPY-2 radar and system components typically require approximately 0.8 hectare (2 acres) of graded compacted hardstand surface and approximately 5 hectares (12 acres) of "clear zone" to allow unobstructed, low-elevation radiation. Contained within the clear zone is a "hazard clear zone" of approximately 2.5 hectares (6 acres).

As of 2007 the prime contractor for this program, Raytheon IDS had delivered the first two of five planned AN/TPY-2 radars to the Missile Defense Agency. The first radar, delivered in November 2004, was deployed in Japan. It was the first new Missile Defense Agency system to be developed and deployed as an operational asset outside the U.S. The second AN/TPY-2 radar completed acceptance testing at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. Raytheon is also responsible for whole-life engineering support for AN/TPY-2 radars under a contract awarded in June 2005.

A U.S. military mobile BMD radar (AN/TPY-2, i.e., "X-Band Radar") was deployed in June 2006 to the. ASDF Shariki Sub-base in Aomori Prefecture, Japan. A new detachment, consisting of a small team of military service members and contractors who will operate and maintain the Forward Based X-Band Radar Transportable (FBX-T) system, was honored during an activation ceremony 26 September 2006 at Camp Shariki in Aomori Pref., hosted by Brig. Gen. John E. Seward, commanding general of 94th Army Air and Missile Defense Command of the U.S. Army Pacific Command. The FBX-T radar is designed to provide early detection and tracking of ballistic missile threats while providing a key element to the layered defense strategy. The radar is a defensive system with no offensive capability and will fall under the command and control of the 94th AAMDC, which is based at Fort Shafter, Hi. The command officially joined USARPAC in Oct. 2005.

Fiscal Year 2008 project MDA 591 constructs an OCONUS site that supports the Forward Based X-Band Radar, Transportable (FBX-T) now designated AN/TPY -2. The MDA intends to use authority provided by the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2007, Public Law 109-364, Subtitle C- Missile Defense Programs, SEC.221. Fielding of Ballistic Missile Defense Capabilities to spend approximately $28.6M for this construction and incrementally fund the work in FY 08 ($24.4M). The MDA plans to incrementally fund the remaining work in FY 09 ($4.2M). It constructs hardstand for the AN/TPY-2 components, Antenna Equipment Unit, Electronic Equipment Unit, and Cooling Equipment Unit along with a Power Distribution System, communications network, UHF/SATCOM interface, shelters for security, administration, maintenance and storage, radar support, power generators, frequency converters and switchgear, fuel storage, commercial connection, road access, and security/lighting (classified storage and equipment security). Additionally, nodes at Fort Greely, Alaska, Wahiawa, Hawaii and Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, will be enhanced for the purpose of command, control and communications. Supporting facilities include: water, sewer, gas and electric service; paving, walks, curbs and gutters; storm drainage; fire protection and alarm systems; site improvements; physical security; and telecommunications systems. Access for the handicapped will be provided.

Fiscal Year 2008 project MDA 592 constructs two OCONUS sites that support the Mid-Course Radar (M-CR) and the Forward Based X-Band Radar, Transportable (FBX-T) now designated AN/TPY-2, respectively. The MDA has used special authority in Public Law to use Research Development Test and Engineering funding for Fielding of Ballistic Missile Defense Capabilities and anticipates similar authorization in the future. Based on this authority, the MDA intends to spend approximately $312.5 M in total cost for this project with a funding profile of $115.0 M in FY09, $151.9 M in FY10 and $45.4 M in FY11. It constructs hardstand for the AN/TPY-2 components, Antenna Equipment Unit, Electronic Equipment Unit, and Cooling Equipment Unit along with a Power Distribution System, communications network, UHF/SATCOM interface, shelters for security, administration, maintenance and storage, radar support, power generators, frequency converters and switchgear, fuel storage, commercial connection, road access, and security/lighting (classified storage and equipment security). The M-CR requires a more robust effort for fixed site radar, operations/maintenance/storage facility, BMDS Communications Support Complex (BCSC), security/entry control, power plant, fuel storage, and all supporting infrastructure including security/lighting (classified storage and equipment security). Supporting facilities include: water, sewer, gas and electric service; paving, walks, curbs and gutters; storm drainage; fire protection and alarm systems; site improvements; physical security; and telecommunications systems. Access for the handicapped will be provided.



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