Military


UN Storage Compatibility Groupings

Under the UNO system, there are 13 storage compatibility groupings, which further categorize Class 1 explosives by their form or composition, ease of ignition, and sensitivity to detonation.

  • SCG A--Bulk-initiating explosives that have the necessary sensitivity to friction, heat, or percussion (shock) to make them suitable for use as initiating elements in an explosive train. A distinction is made between primary initiating explosives and nonprimary initiating explosives. Examples of primary initiating explosives are lead azide, lead styphnate, mercury fulminate, and tetracene. Examples of nonprimary initiating explosives are dry forms of cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX), cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX), and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN).

  • SCG B--Detonators and similar initiating devices that do not contain two or more independent safety features. This group also consists of items that contain initiating explosives designed to initiate or continue the functioning of an explosives train. Examples are blasting caps, small arms primers, fuzes, and detonators of all types.
  • SCG C--Bulk propellants, propelling charges, and devices containing propellant with or without their own means of initiation. Upon initiation, these items will deflagrate, explode, or detonate. Examples are single-, double-, and triple-base propellants; composite propellants; rocket motors (solid propellant); and ammunition with inert projectiles.

  • SCG D--High explosives (HE) and devices containing HE without their own means of initiation and without a propelling charge. This group includes explosives and ammunition that can be expected to explode or detonate when any given item or component thereof is initiated. This group does not include devices containing initiating explosives with independent safety features. Examples are wet HMX, plastic-bonded explosives (explosives formulated with a desensitizing plastic binder), trinitrotoluene (TNT), and black powder.

  • SCG E--Explosives devices that lack their own means of initiation but contain or have a propelling charge (other than one containing a flammable or hypergolic liquid). Examples are artillery ammunition, rockets, and guided missiles.

  • SCG F--Explosives devices that have their own means of initiation and with or without propelling charge. Examples are grenades, sounding devices, and similar items with an in-line explosive train in the initiator.

  • SCG G--Pyrotechnic materials and devices containing pyrotechnic materials. Examples are devices that, when functioning, result in illumination, smoke, or an incendiary, lachrymatory, or sound effect.

  • SCG H--Ammunition containing both explosives and white phosphorus (WP) or other pyrophoric material. Ammunition in this group contains fillers that are spontaneously flammable when exposed to the atmosphere. Examples are WP, plasticized white phosphorus (PWP), or other ammunition containing pyrophoric material.

  • SCG J--Ammunition containing both explosives and flammable liquids or gels. Ammunition in this group contains flammable liquids or gels other than those that are spontaneously flammable when exposed to water or the atmosphere. Examples are liquid- or gel-filled incendiary ammunition, fuel-air explosive (FAE) devices, flammable liquid-fueled missiles, and torpedoes.

  • SCG K--Ammunition containing both explosives and toxic chemical agents. Ammunition in this group contains chemicals specifically designed for incapacitating effects more severe than lachrymation. Examples are artillery or mortar ammunition (fuzed or unfuzed), grenades, and rockets or bombs filled with a lethal or incapacitating chemical agent.

  • SCG L--Explosives or ammunition not included in other SC/HC groups. This group includes explosives or ammunition with characteristics that do not permit storage with other similar or dissimilar materials. Examples are damaged or suspect explosives devices or containers, explosives that have undergone severe testing, fuel-air explosive devices, and water-activated devices. Also included are experimental explosives, explosives of temporary interest, newly synthesized compounds, new mixtures, and salvaged explosives, unless established asbeing compatible with the original materials. Types of explosives in this group presenting similar hazards may be stored together.

  • SCG N--Hazard Division 1.6 ammunition containing only extremely insensitive detonating substances (IEDS). Examples are bombs and warheads. If dissimilar Group N munitions, such as MK 82 and MK 84 bombs, are mixed together and have not been tested to assure nonpropagation, the mixed munitions are considered to be Hazard Division 1.2, Storage and Compatibility Group D, for purposes of transportation and storage.

  • SCG S--Explosives, explosives devices, or ammunition presenting no significant hazard. Explosives ammunition, so designated or packed that, when in storage, all hazardous explosives effects are confined and self-contained within the item or package. Materials in this group are such that an incident that destroys all items in a single pack will not be communicated to other packs. Examples are thermal batteries, cable cutters, explosive actuators, and other ammunition items packaged to meet the criteria of this group.

Group A--Initiating explosives (* indicates primary initiating explosives)

CL-20 (Hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane; dry)

CP (5-Cyanotetrazolpentaamine Cobalt III perchlorate)

HMX (Cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine; dry)

*Lead azide

*Lead styphnate

*Mercury fulminate

*Nitrocellulose (dry)

PETN (Pentaerythritol tetranitrate; dry)

RDX (Cyclotrimethylene trinitramine; dry)

*TATNB (Triazidotrinitrobenzene)

*Tetracene

Group B--Detonators and similar initiating devices

Blasting caps

Detonators (excluding EBW and slapper)

Explosive bolts

Fragmenting actuators

Ignitors

Low-energy initiators (LEIs)

MDF (mild detonating fuze) detonator assemblies

Pressure cartridges

Primers

Squibs

Group C--Bulk propellant, propellant charges, and devices containing propellants with or without their own means of initiation

Smokeless powder

Pistol and rifle powder

Rocket-motor solid propellants

Group D--High explosives and devices containing explosives without their own means of initiation
(* indicates that classification may change depending on nitrogen and moisture content. Contact Hazards Control Department explosives safety personnel for additional guidance.)

Ammonium picrate

Baratol

Black Powder

Boracitol

Chemical lenses

CL-20 (Hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane; wet)

Compositions A, B, and C (all types)

Cyclotols (< 85% RDX)

DATB (Diaminotrinitrobenzene)

Detasheet

Detonating cord (primacord or mild detonating fuze)

bis-Dinitropropyl adipate

bis-Dinitropropyl glutarate

bis-Dinitropropyl maleate

Dinitropropane

Dinitropropanol

Dinitropropyl acrylate monomer (DNPA)

Dinitroproply acrylate polymer (PDNPA)

EBW and slapper detonators

Elastomeric plastic bonded explosives

Explosive D

GAP (Glyceryl azide polymer)

HMX (Cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine; wet)

HMX/wax (formulated with at least 1% wax)

HNS (Hexanitrostilbene; wet or dry)

Linear-shaped charge

Methyl dinitropentanoate

Mild detonating fuze (MDF)

NG/TA (Nitroglycerine-triacetine)

*Nitrocellulose (wet)

Nitroguanidine (NQ)

Octol (< 75% HMX)

Pentolite

PETN (Pentaerythritol tetranitrate; wet)

PETN/extrudable binder

PGN (Polyglycidyl nitrate)

Plane wave lenses (composed of SC/HC Group D explosives)

Plastic-bonded explosive, PBX (a SC/HC Group D formulated with a desensitizing binder)

Potassium picrate

Primacord

RDX (Cyclotrimethylene trinitramine; wet)

Shaped charges (composed of SC/HC Group D explosives)

TATB (Triamino trinitrobenzene)

TATB/DATB mixtures

TEGDN (Triethylene glycol dinitrate)

Tetryl

TMETN (Trimethylolethane trinitrate)

TNAZ (Trinitoazetidine)

TNT (Trinitrotoluene)

Group E--Explosives devices without their own means of initiation and with propelling charge

Artillery ammunition

Rockets (e.g., M66 LAW)

Group F--Explosives devices with detonators and detonating trains assembled to the devices and with propelling charge

Grenades

Sounding devices

Group G--Pyrotechnic material and devices that produce an incendiary, illumination, lachrymatory, smoke, or sound effect

Smoke pots/grenades

Flares

Incendiary ammunition

Group H--Ammunition containing both explosives and white phosphorus (WP) or other pyrophoric material

White phosphorus

Plasticized white phosphorus

Group J--Ammunition containing both explosives and flammable liquids or gels.

Liquid- or gel-filled incendiary ammunition

Fuel-air explosive (FAE) devices

Flammable liquid-fueled missiles

Torpedoes

Group K--Ammunition containing both explosives and toxic chemicals

Artillery or mortar ammunition (fuzed or unfuzed), grenades, rockets, or bombs filled with a lethal or incapacitating agent

Group L--Explosives or other ammunition not included in other storage compatibility groups

Damaged or suspect explosives devices or containers

Explosives that have undergone severe testing

Experimental explosives, explosives of temporary interest, newly synthesized compounds, new mixtures, and some salvaged explosives

Group N--Hazard Class/Division 1.6 ammunition containing only extremely insensitive detonating substances (EIDS)

Bombs

Warheads

Group S--Explosives, explosives devices, or ammunition presenting no significant hazard

Propellant cartridge-actuated devices (which yield a nonfragmenting, nonflame-producing controlled reaction). Examples include cable cutters, cartridge-actuated valves, and linear actuators (e.g., dimple, piston, or bellows motors)

Safety fuse

Most small arms ammunition below 50 caliber

Thermal batteries



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