Military


Operation Northern Watch
1999 Events

  • 16 March 1999  Between approximately 11:45 p.m. and 12:15 p.m. Iraqi time today, Operation Northern Watch (ONW) aircraft detected Iraqi radar posing a threat to coalition aircraft. Responding in self-defense, U.S. Air Force F-15E Strike Eagles dropped GBU-12 laser guided bombs on several anti-aircraft artillery sites northwest of Mosul.
  • 15 March 1999  Between approximately 12:15 p.m. and 1:00 p.m. Iraqi time today, Operation Northern Watch (ONW) aircraft detected Iraqi radar posing a threat to coalition aircraft. Responding in self-defense, U.S. Air Force F-15E Strike Eagles dropped GBU-12 laser guided bombs on several anti-aircraft artillery sites northwest of Mosul.
  • 14 March 1999  Between approximately 12:45 p.m. and 1:20 p.m. Iraqi time today, Operation Northern Watch aircraft observed Iraqi anti-aircraft artillery fire and detected Iraqi radar posing a threat to coalition aircraft. Responding in self-defense, U.S. Air Force F-15E Strike Eagles dropped GBU-12 laser guided bombs on several anti-aircraft artillery sites northwest and west of Mosul.
  • 12 March 1999  Between 10:30 a.m. and noon Iraqi time today, Operation Northern Watch aircraft detected several active Iraqi radars posing a threat to coalition aircraft. Responding in self-defense, U.S. Air Force F-15E Strike Eagles dropped GBU-12 laser guided bombs and a U.S. Marine Corps EA-6B Prowler fired a High-speed Anti-Radiation Missile on several Iraqi anti-aircraft artillery sites north and northwest of Mosul.
  • 9 March 1999  Between approximately 12:35 and 1 p.m. Iraqi time, Operation Northern Watch coalition aircraft detected several active Iraqi radars posing a threat to coalition forces. Responding in self defense, U.S. Air Force F-15E Strike Eagles dropped GBU-12 laser-guided bombs on several Iraqi anti-aircraft artillery sites west and south of Mosul.
  • 8 March 1999  Between approximately 12:35 p.m. and 1:35 p.m. Iraqi time, Operation Northern Watch coalition aircraft detected several active Iraqi radars posing a threat to coalition forces. Responding in self-defense, U.S. Air Force F-15E Strike Eagles dropped GBU-12 laser-guided bombs on several Iraqi anti-aircraft artillery sites around Saddam Lake.  Coalition aircraft have been enforcing the Northern no-fly zone nearly eight years. Since Dec. 28, 1998, Saddam Hussein has opted to challenge this enforcement by targeting coalition aircraft with radar, surface-to-air missile systems and anti-aircraft artillery. Operation Northern Watch coalition aircraft will respond in self defense to these threats while continuing to enforce the no-fly zone.
  • 6 March 1999  Between 12:20 and 2:20 p.m. Iraqi time, Operation Northern Watch coalition aircraft observed Iraqi anti-aircraft artillery fire while conducting routine enforcement of the northern no-fly zone.  Responding in self defense to this attack and to threats from Iraqi surface-to-air missile radar systems, U.S. Air Force F-15E Strike Eagles attacked five Iraqi anti-aircraft artillery sites located south of Saddam Lake with GBU-12 laser guided bombs.
  • 1 March 1999  Between 2:30 and 3:30 p.m. Iraqi time, while conducting routine enforcement of the northern no-fly zone, and in response to several incidents of Iraqi radar targeting coalition aircraft, U.S. F-15Es dropped more than thirty 2,000 pound and 500 pound laser guided bombs on Iraqi communications sites, radio relay sites, and anti-aircraft artillery sites. The incidents happened near Mosul, Iraq.
  • 28 February 1999  Between 1:55 and 2:15 p.m. Iraqi time, while conducting routine enforcement of the northern no-fly zone, and in response to anti-aircraft artillery fire, a flight of U.S. F-15Es launched AGM-130 air-to-ground guided missiles and dropped GBU-24 laser-guided bombs on an Iraqi air defense headquarters and radio relay site. Additonally, between 2:13 and 2:35 p.m. Iraqi time, F-15Es dropped GBU-12 and GBU-24 laser-guided bombs on the radio relay site, as well as on an Iraqi surface-to-air missile site. The Iraqi radio relay site was being used by the Iraqi government to pass targeting data from Iraqi's radars to Iraqi anti-aircraft artillery guns shooting at coalition aircraft. Coalition forces did not target nor was there damage to an Iraqi pipeline or an Iraqi oil pumping station. The incidents happened near Mosul,Iraq.
  • 23 February 1999  Between 1:45 and 2:00 p.m. Iraqi time, while conducting routine enforcement of the northern no-fly zone, and in response to anti-aircraft artillery fire, three U.S. F-15Es dropped GBU-24 precision guided bombs on an Iraqi command and control bunker.
  • 22 February 1999  Between 11:15 and 1:30 p.m. Iraqi time, while conducting routine enforcement of the northern no-fly zone, a flight of U.S. F-15Es dropped GBU-12 and GBU-10 precision guided bombs on multiple Iraqi anti-aircraft artillery and radar sites near Mosul after being fired upon and targeted by those sites.
  • 19 February 1999  Between 12:10 p.m. and 12:30 p.m. Iraqi time, while conducting routine enforcement of the northern no-fly zone, two U.S. F-16CJs launched AGM-88 high-speed antiradiation missiles (HARM) in self defense at a radar site near Mosul that had illuminated the aircraft.
  • 15 February 1999  At approximately 11:20 a.m. Iraqi time, a flight of F-15Es enforcing the Northern no-fly zone over Iraq today was fired upon by an anti-aircraft artillery site north of Mosul.  In response to this hostile act, one of the F-15Es dropped a GBU-12 on the AAA site.  Also, at approximately 12:26 p.m. Iraqi time, a Marine Corps EA-6B launched a high-speed antiradiation missile (HARM) in self defense at a radar site that had targeted the aircraft.
  • 12 February 1999  At approximately 1:30 p.m. Iraqi time, an F-15E enforcing the Northern no-fly zone over Iraq was fired upon by an anti-aircraft artillery site north of Mosul. The F-15E dropped a GBU-12 in response to this hostile act.
  • 11 February 1999  Between approximately 12:15 and 12:30 p.m. Iraqi time, a U.S. Air Force F-15E Strike Eagle flight observed Iraqi anti-aircraft artillery fire and was also illuminated by an Iraqi radar system near Mosul. Acting in self-defense, one F-15E dropped; GBU-12s on an Iraqi surface-to-air missile communications site.  Two F-15Es launched an AGM-130 and dropped GBU-12s on an Iraqi surface-to-air missile system.   At 1:32 p.m. Iraqi time, a U.S. Air Force F-15E Strike Eagle dropped GBU-12 precision- guided munitions on an Iraqi surface-to-air missile site west of Mosul.   Two minutes later, a U.S. Air Force F-16CJ Fighting Falcon launched an AGM-88 high-speed antiradiation missile at an Iraqi radar site northwest of Mosul. Close to 1:38 p.m. Iraqi time, a U.S. Air Force F-15E dropped GBU-12s on a surface-to-air missile communications site east of Mosul.
  • 2 February 1999  At 2:20 p.m. Iraqi time, two U.S. Air Force F-15E Strike Eagles dropped two GBU-12 precision-guided munitions on an anti-aircraft artillery battery in response to being targeted by Iraqi radar near Mosul. In a separate incident approximately 15 minutes later, two additional  F-15Es, also responding after being targeted by Iraqi radar, dropped GBU-12 precision-guided munitions on the same anti-aircraft artillery site.  In a third incident at approximately 3:15 p.m. Iraqi time, a U.S. Marine EA-6B launched a high-speed anti-radiation missile (HARM) at an SA-2 radar site.  In a fourth incident at approximately 3:20 p.m. Iraqi time, F-15Es dropped GBU-12 precision-guided munitions on an anti-aircraft artillery site.  Finally, in a fifth incident which occurred at approximately 3:30 p.m. Iraqi time, F-15Es dropped GBU-12s on another anti-aircraft artillery site. 
  • 31 January 1999  At approximately 3:20 p.m. Iraqi time today, a U.S. Air Force F-16CJ Fighting Falcon acting in self defense launched a high-speed antiradiation missile (HARM) at a radar system north of Mosul.
  • 30 January 1999 -- At approximately 3 p.m. Iraqi time, coalition aircraft were targeted by Iraqi radars near Mosul. A U.S. Air Force F-15E Strike Eagle responded in self defense by launching an AGM-130 at the radar site. A second incident occurred shortly after 3 p.m. Iraqi time. A group of U.S. Air Force F-15E Strike Eagles acting in self defense after being targeted, dropped two GBU-12 precision-guided munitions on an Iraqi Skyguard surface-to-air missile site. In a third incident at about the same time, F-15Es acting in self defense dropped two GBU-12 precision-guided munitions on an anti-aircraft artillery system and its associated radar which threatened coalition aircraft. The fourth incident occurred close to 3:30 p.m. Iraqi time, when F-15Es acting in self-defense dropped GBU-12s on another anti-aircraft artillery site. In a fifth incident at approximately 4:30 p.m. Iraqi time, a U.S. Marine EA-6B Prowler fired a high-speed antiradiation missile in response to being targeted by a radar-guided anti-aircraft artillery system. Finally in the sixth incident a minute later, F-15Es responded defensively by dropping GBU-12s on a separate anti-aircraft artillery site.
  • 28 January 1999 -- At approximately 3:45p.m. Iraqi time, two F-15Es observed fire by an anti-aircraft artillery site located north of Mosul. In self-defense, the two F-15Es dropped a total of three GBU-12s on the anti-aircraft artillery site.
  • 26 January 1999 -- Between 1:25 and 1:50 p.m. Iraqi time, coalition aircraft were targeted by Iraqi surface-to-air missile and anti-aircraft artillery systems in three separate incidents near Mosul. An EA-6B Prowler, acting in self defense after being targeted by Iraqi radar, launched a HARM at an Iraqi radar site. An F-15E dropped a GBU-12 500-pound precision-guided munition in response to an anti-aircraft artillery system which posed a threat to coalition aircraft. In another incident, two F-15Es fired one AGM-130 each at a radar site which had targeted coalition aircraft. In another incident between 3 and 3:30 p.m. Iraqi time, coalition aircraft were again targeted by anti-aircraft artillery systems near Mosul. Three F-15Es, acting in self defense after being targeted by Iraqi anti-aircraft artillery systems, dropped GBU-12 500-pound precision-guided munitions.
  • 25 January 1999 -- Between 1:57 and 2:30 p.m. Iraqi time, coalition aircraft were again illuminated and fired upon by Iraqi surface-to-air missile and anti-aircraft artillery systems in several incidents. An F-15E was fired upon by an anti-aircraft artillery system. Two F-15Es then dropped one GBU-12 each on the system. In another incident, an EA-6B launched a HARM at an SA-2 SAM site that posed a threat to coalition forces in the area. An F-16CJ launched a HARM at a different SA-2 SAM site that posed a threat to coalition forces in the area. Coalition forces observed an Iraqi SAM launch in the vicinity of coalition aircraft. Coalition aircraft departed the area and continued operations.
  • 24 January 1999 -- Between 2:30 and 3:30 p.m. Iraqi time, coalition aircraft were again targeted by Iraqi surface-to-air missile and anti-aircraft artillery systems near Mosul. An EA-6B Prowler and two F-16CJs fired HARMs in self defense. The aircraft responded to being targeted by Iraqi radars used to guide anti-aircraft artillery. Another F-16CJ fired a HARM at an Iraqi surface-to-air missile system. Earlier in the day, an F-15E Strike Eagle scored a direct hit on an Iraqi SA-3 SAM site with an AGM-130, which posed a threat to coalition forces in the region.
  • 14 January 1999 -- During the morning, an F-16CJ fired a HARM at an Iraqi surface-to-air missile and anti-aircraft artillery system that posed a threat to coalition aircraft over northern Iraq. In a separate incident, an F-15E launched an AGM-130 precision guided missile at a surface-to-air missile system that threatened coalition forces.
  • 13 January 1999 -- Iraqi SAM systems tracked and fired on coalition planes over northern Iraq. During the morning, coalition aircraft were illuminated by several Iraqi surface-to-air missile systems. The aircraft were fired upon by at least one surface-to-air missile. The aircrews acting in self-defense suppressed the ground-based missile launch sites because they posed a significant threat to coalition forces. A flight of four U.S. Air Force F-15Es fired two AGM-130s, and an F-16CJ and U.S. Marine Corps EA-6B each fired a HARM against a SAM radar. The incident occurred near Mosul. The two AGM-130s were direct hits on the Iraqi SAM sites.
  • 12 January 1999 -- At approximately 11:01 a.m. Iraqi time, coalition aircraft were illuminated by an Iraqi surface-to-air missile system. An F-16CJ acted in self-defense, firing a HARM at the Iraqi early warning radar in response to this hostile act. The incident occurred east of Mosul. Five Iraqi jets violated the southern no-fly zone and two entered the north, bringing the total violations in both zones since Desert Fox to more than 70, Pentagon officials said.
  • 11 January 1999 -- At approximately 10:45 a.m. Iraqi time, an Iraqi SAM radar began tracking Northern Watch aircraft and coalition aircraft were illuminated by multiple Iraqi surface-to-air missile systems. The aircrews acted in self-defense and suppressed one ground-based missile launch site because it posed a threat to coalition forces. A flight of two U.S. F-15Es launched two AGM-130s at an SA-6 site near Mosul and an U.S. F-16CJ fired a HARM at an Iraqi radar site a short while later.
  • 07 January 1999 -- At approximately 11:20 a.m. Iraqi time, Saddam Hussein’s regime locked a surface-to-air missile radar on to coalition forces. An Air Force F-16CJ acted in self defense, and fired a high-speed anti-radiation missile (HARM) at a Roland surface-to-missile site 15 miles northwest of Mosul after being targeted by the site’s radar to suppress the offensive site.



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