Military

[ Navy Training System Plans ]




 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NAVY TRAINING SYSTEM PLAN

FOR THE

AIRBORNE EXPENDABLE

COUNTERMEASURES

N878-NTSP-A-XX50-0109XXXX/D

OCTOBER NOVDECEMBER 2000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Enclosure (1)

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

This Draft Navy Training System Plan (NTSP) has been developed by the Naval Air Systems Command to identify Manpower, Personnel, and Training requirements associated with Airborne Expendable Countermeasures. Airborne Expendable Countermeasures addressed in this NTSP are currently in the Production, Fielding, Deployment, and Operational Support phase of the Weapons System Acquisition Process. No previous NTSP exists for Airborne Expendable Countermeasures.

Airborne Expendable Countermeasures are electronic warfare devices used for preemptive or terminal protection of aircraft from Radio Frequency (RF) or Infrared (IR) guided missile attack. Countermeasures are grouped into threat categories of RF passive, RF active, or IR, and include decoy flares, chaff, and expendable RF jamming devices. Decoy flares act as decoys for diverting heat seeking missiles, chaff provides a passive jamming action against enemy radar, while expendable jamming devices transmit RF power to counter airborne and land based semi-active radar guided missiles. Countermeasure devices are deployed from fixed or rotary wing aircraft equipped with countermeasure dispensers.

There are no preventive maintenance requirements for Airborne Expendable Countermeasures devices, at organizational, intermediate, or depot maintenance levels. Limited upkeep maintenance consisting of visual inspections, loading and unloading, packaging and unpackaging, and compliance with pertinent technical directives is performed at organizational and intermediate maintenance levels. Preventative maintenance requirements for Airborne Expendable Countermeasure Systems are addressed the applicable aircraft NTSP's. These functions are within the capability of existing aircraft and ordnance Navy Enlisted Classifications and Marine Corps Military Occupational Specialties.

Airborne Expendable Countermeasures do not have any impact on existing manpower requirements for officers, flight crews, or ground crews for squadrons, weapons departments (ashore or afloat), or training activities. All existing manpower is adequate to support Airborne Expendable Countermeasures.

Training for Airborne Expendable Countermeasures is included in formal aviation ordnance training courses or is accomplished as on-the-job training. A Countermeasures and Associated Cartridges safety lesson has been incorporated into the ordnance training track to present hazards associated with handling and storage of Airborne Expendable Countermeasures. This training will beis conducted at Maintenance Training Units, Fleet Replacement Enlisted Skills Training activities, and specific aircraft tactical weapons training schools. Specific training on countermeasure devices applicable to a particular aircraft type is conducted at the squadron level. At this time no new training courses are required.

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page

Executive Summary i

List of Acronyms iii

Preface v

PART I - TECHNICAL PROGRAM DATA

A. Title-Nomenclature-Program I-1

B. Security Classification I-1

C. Manpower, Personnel, and Training Principals I-1

D. System Description I-2

E. Developmental Test and Operational Test I-2

F. Aircraft and/or Equipment/System/Subsystem Replaced I-3

G. Description of New Development I-3

H. Concepts I-11

I. On-Board (In-Service) Training I-16

J. Logistics Support I-17

K. Schedules I-18

L. Government Furnished Equipment and Contractor Furnished Equipment Training Requirements I-19

M. Related NTSPs and Other Applicable Documents I-19

PART II - BILLET AND PERSONNEL REQUIREMENTS II-1

PART III - TRAINING REQUIREMENTS III-1

PART IV - TRAINING LOGISTICS SUPPORT REQUIREMENTS IV-1

PART V - MPT MILESTONES V-1

PART VI - DECISION ITEMS/ACTION REQUIRED VI-1

PART VII - POINTS OF CONTACT VII-1

LIST OF ACRONYMS

AMD

Activated Metal Decoy

AMTCS

Aviation Maintenance Training Continuum System

AO

Aviation Ordnanceman

ASTE

Advanced Strategic and Tactical Expendable

   

CINCLANTFLT

Commander in Chief, Atlantic Fleet

CINCPACFLT

Commander in Chief, Pacific Fleet

CMDS

Countermeasures Dispenser System

CNET

Chief Naval Education and Training

CNO

Chief of Naval Operations

   

DT

Developmental Test

   

ECP

Engineering Change Proposal

   

FREST

Fleet Replacement Enlist Skills Training

FOT&E

Follow-On Test and Evaluation

FY

Fiscal Year

   

GEN-X

Generic Expendable Decoy

   

HERO

Hazards of Electromagnetic Radiation To Ordnance

   

ILSP

Integrated Logistics Support Plan

IPO

International Program Office

IR

Infrared

IRCM

Infrared Countermeasure

   

MATMEP

Marine Training Management Evaluation Program

MCCDC

Marine Corps Combat Development Command

MOS

Military Occupational Specialty

MTIP

Maintenance Training Improvement Program

MTU

Maintenance Training Unit

   

NA

Not Applicable

NALC

Naval Ammunition Logistics Code

NAMTRAU

Naval Air Maintenance Training Unit

NAVAIR

Naval Air Systems Command

NAVAIRSYSCOM

Naval Air Systems Command

NAVPERSCOM

Naval Personnel Command

NEC

Navy Enlisted Classification

NOMMP

Naval Ordnance Maintenance Management Program

NSWC

Naval Surface Warfare Center

NTSP

Navy Training System Plan

   

OPNAV

Office of the Chief of Naval Operations

OPNAVINST

Office of the Chief of Naval Operations Instruction

OPO

Office of the Chief of Naval Operations Principal Official

OSD

Office of the Secretary of Defense

OT

Operational Test

   

PEO(T)

Program Executive Officer (Tactical Aircraft Programs)

PIP

Product Improvement Program

PMA

Program Manager, Air

POET

Primed Oscillator Expendable Transponder

   

RF

Radio Frequency

   

TFS

Total Force Structure

TTE

Technical Training Equipment

TTSARB

Technology Transfer Security Assistance Review Board

   

USAF

United States Air Force

USN

United States Navy

   

WSESRB

Weapons System Explosive Safety Review Board

 

PREFACE

This Draft Navy Training System Plan (NTSP) is a new publication. There is no existing NTSP. This document has been developed by the Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIRSYSCOM), in accordance with Office of the Chief of Naval Operations (OPNAV) Publication P-751-1-9-97 to identify Manpower, Personnel, and Training requirements associated with airborne expendable countermeasures. It reflects current logistics support requirements for training activities that provide instruction on maintenance and safety while using Airborne Expendable Countermeasures. It identifies training courses and training tracks affected by the Airborne Expendable Countermeasures. It identifies training course equipment, curricula materials, and technical manuals. It also identifies the points of contact.

N878-NTSP-A-XX50-0109XXXX/D

January 1998OctoberNovDecember 2000

PART I - TECHNICAL PROGRAM DATA

A. TITLE-NOMENCLATURE-PROGRAM

1. Nomenclature-Title-Acronym. Airborne Expendable Countermeasures

2. Program Element. 0204162N and 0206138M

B. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION

1. System Characteristics Unclassified

2. Capabilities Unclassified

3. Functions Unclassified

C. MANPOWER, PERSONNEL, AND TRAINING PRINCIPALS

OPNAV Principal Official (OPO) Program Sponsor CNO (N8780)

OPO Resource Sponsor CNO (N8780C4)

Developing Agency (DA) PEO(T) (PMA272)

Training Agency (TA) CINCLANTFLT

CINCPACFLT

CNET

MCCDC

Training Support Agency (TSA) NAVAIRSYSCOM (PMA205)

Manpower and Personnel (M&P) Mission Sponsor CNO (N12)

NAVPERSCOM (PERS-4, PERS-404)

Director of Naval Training CNO (N79)

Marine Corps Force Structure MCCDC (C53)

Marine Corps Combat Development Command

Manpower Management...............................................................................TFS Division

D. SYSTEM DESCRIPTION

1. Operational Uses. Airborne Expendable Countermeasures are electronic warfare devices used for preemptive or terminal protection of aircraft from Radio Frequency (RF) or Infrared (IR) guided missile attack. Countermeasures are grouped into threat categories of RF passive, RF active, or IR, and include devices such as decoy flares, chaff, and expendable RF jammers. Countermeasure devices are launched from sonobuoy pods, LAU-10 rocket launcher pods, LAU-138A/A guided missile launcher sets, and AN/ALE-29/A, AN/ALE-37/A, AN/ALE-39, AN/ALE-41, AN/ALE-43, or AN/ALE-47 countermeasure dispensers. Airborne Expendable Countermeasures may be deployed from both fixed wing and rotary wing aircraft.

2. Foreign Military Sales. Airborne Expendable Countermeasures (ABN EXP C/M) release and sales to foreign countries is controlled by the policy defined in Navy Technology Ttransfer Security Assistance Review Board (TTSARB) 97-09. No transfer or sales of Airborne Expendable Countermeasures is are authorized except through the Navy international International Program Office (IPO)

E. DEVELOPMENTAL TEST AND OPERATIONAL TEST. Developmental Tests (DT) and Operational Tests (OT) have been completed on all Airborne Expendable Countermeasures now in use except for the Advanced Strategic and Tactical Expendable (ASTE). The ASTE DT was completed in December 1999. ASTE OT is expected to begin in July 2001, and be completed in December 2002.

F. AIRCRAFT AND/OR EQUIPMENT/SYSTEM/SUBSYSTEM REPLACED. Certain specific Airborne Expendable Countermeasure devices will be replaced by attrition as shown in the following table:

EXISTING DEVICE

REPLACEMENT DEVICE

MK46 MOD 1C Decoy Flare

MJU-32/D Decoy Flare

MJU-8/B Decoy Flare

MJU 8A/B Decoy Flare

MJU-8A/B Decoy Flare

MJU-38/B Decoy Flare

CCU-41/B

CCU-136/A

CCU-63/B

CCU-136/A

MJU-27/B

MJU-27A/B

SM-875/ALE

SM-875A/ALE

G. DESCRIPTION OF NEW DEVELOPMENT

1. Functional Description. Airborne Expendable Countermeasures are electronic warfare devices used for preemptive or terminal protection of aircraft from RF or IR guided missile attack. Countermeasures are grouped into threat categories of RF passive, RF active, or IR, and include decoy flares, chaff, and expendable RF jamming devices. Decoy flares act as decoys for diverting heat seeking missiles, chaff provides a passive jamming action against enemy radar, while expendable jamming devices transmit RF power to counter airborne and land based semi-active radar guided missiles. Countermeasure devices are deployed from fixed or rotary wing aircraft equipped with countermeasure dispensers.

a. InfraredInfrared Devices

(1) MK46 MOD 1C Decoy Flare. The MK46 MOD 1C Decoy Flare is a magnesium fueled device which provides self-protection against IR missiles for the A/UH-1, H-46, SH-60, C-130, and P-3C Aircraft. This decoy is ejected from AN/ALE-39 or AN/ALE-47 Countermeasure Dispensers with either a CCU-63/B or CCU-136/A Impulse Cartridge. The MK46 MOD 1C Decoy Flare is being replaced by the MJU-32/B through attrition.

(2) MJU-8/B Decoy Flare. The MJU-8B Decoy Flare was specifically designed to provide self-protection against IR missiles for Naval tactical aircraft. This decoy is ejected from the AN/ALE-39 or AN/ALE-47 Countermeasures Dispensers with either a CCU-63/B or CCU-136/A Impulse Cartridge. The MJU-8/B was replaced by the MJU-8A/B as an approved operational decoy in 1988. Current inventory assets have been restricted to training use only until depleted.

(3) MJU-8A/B Decoy Flare. This decoy was fielded in 1988 as a product improvement to the MJU-8B Decoy Flare. The MJU-8A/B provides self-protection against IR missiles for Naval tactical aircraft and H-53 Helicopters. This decoy is ejected from the AN/ALE-39 or AN/ALE-47 Countermeasure Dispenser with either a CCU-63/B or CCU-136/A Impulse Cartridge. The MJU-8A/B is being replaced by the MJU-38/B through attrition.

(4) MJU-22/B Decoy Flare. The MJU-22/B Decoy Flare is a product improvement to the MJU-8A/B Decoy Device fielded in 1988, and is similar to that flare with the exception of increased length. The MJU-22/B is used by the EA-6B aircraft and provides a greater degree of protection against IR missiles than the MJU-8A/B Decoy. The MJU-22/B is ejected from the AN/ALE-39 D-47 Extended Magazine (Ten Inch) Countermeasures Dispenser using either a CCU-63/B or CCU-136/A Impulse Cartridge.

(5) MJU-27/B Decoy Flare. The MJU-27/B Decoy Device is dispensed from an AN/ALE-39 or AN/ALE-47 Dispenser using either a CCU-63/B or CCU-136/A Impulse Cartridge. The MJU-27/B is still in active inventory and is being replaced by the MJU-27A/B through attrition.

(6) Advanced Strategic and tactical Tactical Expendable):. The ASTE solution program is a multiservice project involving the efforts of the United States Air Force (USAF) and United States Navy (USN) Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIRNAVAIRSYSCOM) with the USAF having cognizant responsibility for the expendable. ASTE is comprised of three infrared IR decoy configurations. The flares are configured into two groups, the Fighter Group and the Covert Group. Either the Fighter or the Covert Group is dispensed from an AV-8B or F/A-18E/F aircraft utilizing the hybrid AN/ALE-47 dispensing system, under development by the F/A-18E/F program. An MJU-47/B (Kinematic), and MJU-48/B (Companion) flare combination comprises the Fighter Group. The Covert Group is an arrangement of MJU-51/B flares. The MJU-47/B (Kinematic) is a self-propelled infrared IR flare assembly consisting of an outer case, a flare housing with fins and nozzle component and safe and interrupt assembly packaged in a MJU-10 form factor. The MJU-48/B (companion) consists of an outer case, impulse cartridge cup, a mid-spacer with hydrogen and water vapor absorber, a special material payload and an end cap. The sole purpose of the ASTE solution is to redirect incoming missile threats away from the aircraft. The ASTE solution is composed of Non-Developmental Items as well as a redesign effort for the housing and magazines. The redesign modifies the flare casing size and changes the dispenser housing to accommodate the smaller flares. ASTE decoy flares are deployed then actuated by BBU-35/B and BBU-36/B impulse cartridges.

The ASTE solution is capable of deploying a Fighter Group and a Covert Group flare configuration. The group deployed is contingent upon the aircraft platform mission. ASTE is a flare development, not an avionics system. Current planning is for tNAVAIRhe F/A-18E/F and the AV-8B to be equipped with the ASTE solution.

Functionally the ASTE solution will be launched from an AV-8B or F/A-18E/F aircraft using a hybrid AN//ALE-47 Countermeasures Dispensing System (CMDS). When installed in the proper chamber, a corresponding impulse cartridge is installed in a cavity on the breech end of the outer case. Once the impulse cartridge has been initiated from the firing pulse, in the Fighter Group a frangible membrane ruptures and gas pressurizes the outer case. The flare housing and end cap are ejected from the outer case by gas pressure. The slider interrupter prevents the hot gas from igniting the flare assembly prior to clearing the outer case. When clear of the outer case, the slider interrupter allows ignition of the flare assembly. Following ejection, the flare assembly is stabilized by fins, and, upon exposure to the air stream, causes the nose of the flare to point into the wind on a trajectory which approximately parallels that of the aircraft. The burning pellet produces hot gases, which generate radiant infraredIR energy (used to decoy the threat seeker), and thrust, which powers the flare on the desired trajectory. The Covert Group flare functions when the impulse cartridge is initiated by the firing pulse, a frangible membrane ruptures; and the pressure inside the canister increases. A piston drives the special material payload the length of the canister. The force of the payload pushing on the closure disk breaks the seal and propels the payload into the atmosphere where the payload reacts with the air to emit infraredIR radiation.

(7) MJU-49/B Decoy Device. The MJU-49/B decoy device is an IR decoy, providing aircraft survivability and protection against IR guided threats. It was designed to increase the survivability of helicopters and low/slow fixed wing aircraft. It is intended as an improvement over the performance of the MJU-27A/B decoy when used either singly or in combination with other Infrared Countermeasure (IRCM) on helicopters and low/slow fixed wing aircraft. The MJU-49/B decoy device consists of a cylindrical cartridge approximately 1.4 inches in diameter and 5.8 inches in length. The decoy is used in either the ASN/ALE-39 or the AN/ALE-47 CMDS, the payload being dispensed by either a CCU-63/B or CCU-136/A impulse Cartridge. The IR payload produces significant amounts of energy to decoy threats that operate within the 2-5 micrometer wavelength portion of the spectrum. The decoy consists of an appropriate amount of a special type of IR material which, when expelled from the sealed container, performs similarly to the MJU-27A/B decoy by generating heat through a pyrophoric process.

(8) MJU-47/B Kinematic Decoy Flare:.. Prototype development of the Kinematic Decoy Flare began in January 1989. Currently, a joint Navy USN and Air ForceUSAF Program, Advanced Strategic and Tactical Infrared ExpendablesASTE is underway for commercial development and production of a comparable item. The MJU-48 and MJU-51 Decoy Flares are companion devices to the MJU-47/B.

(9) MJU-49/B Decoy Device. The MJU-49/B decoy device is an IR decoy, providing aircraft survivability and protection against IR guided threats. It was designed to increase the survivability of helicopters and low/slow fixed wing aircraft. It is intended as an improvement over the performance of the MJU-27A/B decoy when used either singly or in combination with other IRCM on helicopters and low/slow fixed wing aircraft. The MJU-49/B decoy device consists of a cylindrical cartridge approximately 1.4 inches in diameter and 5.8 inches in length. The decoy is used in either the ASN/ALE-39 or the AN/ALE-47 CMDS, the payload being dispensed by either a CCU-63/B or CCU-136/A impulse Cartridge. The IR payload produces significant amounts of energy to decoy threats that operate within the 2-5 micrometer wavelength portion of the spectrum. The decoy consists of an appropriate amount of a special type of IR material which, when expelled from the sealed container, performs similarly to the MJU-27A/B decoy by generating heat through a pyrophoric process.

(10) MJU-35/B Decoy Flare. MJU-35/B decoy device is an extended length infrared IR decoy product improvement to the MJU-27/B decoy. The decoy provides improved IR output and better protection for high IR signature aircraft. The MJU-35/B contains the same proprietary material as the MJU-27/B and is dimensionally the same except for its extended length. The MJU-35/B has a hazard classification of 4.2G (spontaneously combustible) versus a standard conventional infrared IR decoy, which is 1.3. G. The flare consists of a cylindrical aluminum case approximately 1.42 inches in diameter, 8.1 Iinches long (versus 5.8 InchesInches for the MJU-27/B). The MJU-35/B is designed for the 8.1 inch length AN/ALE-47 CMDS. The only difference between the MJU-35/B and the MJU-27A/B is the length. Based on Direction from the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD)/N78 all future IR countermeasures developments for all future aircraft will require joint Air Force/Navy utilization. Therefore, the MJU-35/B is being replaced with an MJU-7A/B form factor (1x2x8.1"inches).

(11) MJU-36/B Decoy Device. The MJU-36/B infraredIR decoy is an extended length infraredIR decoy product improvement to the MJU-8A/B decoy. The MJU-36/B provides improved safety features and takes advantage of the extended length available to provide better protection for high IR signature aircraft. The only difference between the MJU-38/B and the MJU-36/B is the length. The MJU-36/B is designed for the 8.1"inches Length AM/ALE-47 CMDS used on the F/A-18E/F during Operational Evaluation (OPEVAL). Based on direction from OSD/N78 all future IR countermeasure developments for future aircraft will require joint Air Force/Navy utilization. Therefore, the F/A-18E/F the MJU-36/B is being replaced with an MJU-7A/B form factor (1x2x8.1"inches) magnesium based flare. The basic design and functional sequence of the MJU-36/B is similar to that of the MJU-32/B and MJU-38/B, using the sympathetically ignited, boreriding slider/initiator. The MJU-36/B was initially presented to the Weapons System Explosive Safety Review Board (WSESRB) on 23 May 1996. WSESRB approved the system Safety Plan and provided criteria for development plan approval.

(12) . MJU-52/B Decoy Device. The MJU-52/B (BOL-IR) decoy is an IR decoy, providing enhanced aircraft survivability and protection against IR guided Threats. It was designed to increase the survivability of aircraft capable of carrying the LAU-138A/A Guided Missile Launcher Set BOL dispenser (or its derivatives). The dispenser's currently loaded with 160 chaff cassettes that are dispensed from the BOL by an electro-mechanical gear movement. It is intended the MJU-52/B serve as an improvement over the existing BOL-ALE-39 combination of dispensers by allowing the aircraft commander greater flexibility in optimizing his countermeasure load-out to defeat specific mission threats. The decoy consists of a modified BOL chaff plastic cartridge that houses an IR payload. The IR payload produces a specific amount of IR energy in the 2-5 micrometerwavelength portion of the spectrum. The decoy consists of an appropriate amount of a special IR material, which when expelled from the sealed container, performs similarly to the MJU-27A/B decoy flare by generating heat through a pyrophoric process. The MJU-52/B utilizes the same flatpacks as the BOL chaff to facilitate operational use of the BOL dispenser. The difference between the RF and IR packages revolves around the different payload of the decoy devices. The BOL IR payload is pyrophoric metal (Special Material) which must be contained within an air-tight, sealed package. The operation of the dispenser and the release of the package is the same as with BOL chaff. The BOL IR payload packet seal contains an integral tear strip which is attached to the encapsulating flatback. When released into the air stream the flatpack acts as a parachute due to the relative drag between the payload packet and the flat pack. This drag force, tears open the seal of the payload packet and the pyrophoric payload is released to the air stream, dispensing aerodynamically in the same manner as the chaff.

b. Radio adio Frequencyrequency Devices

(l) AN/ALQ-190(V)1 Chaff Countermeasures Set. The AN/ALQ-190(V)1 is usable as a decoy target for hostile missiles, a confusion target against hostile search radars, target masking coverage, or corridor protection screening to any radar operating in the frequency bands of the AN/ALQ-190(V)1. This countermeasure set is an A-size sonobuoy chaff cartridge designed to be deployed from the SH-3 and SH-60 rotary wing aircraft, and S-3B and P-3C fixed wing aircraft using the A-size sonobuoy launch system.

(2) RR-129/AL Chaff Countermeasure (Operational). The RR-129/AL Chaff Countermeasure (Operational) is a passive countermeasure that provides self-protection against RF search track radars, RF guided missiles, and anti-aircraft batteries. This device can be used on all Naval airframes. The RR-129/AL is being replaced by the RR-129A/AL through attrition.

(3) RR-144/AL Chaff Countermeasure (Training). The RR-144/AL Chaff Countermeasure (Training) Cartridge is used for training against I-band radars. These devices are used on all Naval airframes. Chaff is dispensed from the AN/ALE-29A, AN/ALE-37A, AN/ALE-39, or AN/ALE-47 Dispenser Sets. The RR-144/AL is being replaced by the RR-144A/AL through attrition

(4) RR-171/-172 Chaff Rolls. The RR-171/-172 Chaff Rolls are used with the AN/ALE-41 Chaff Dispenser Pod. The chaff countermeasure is prepackaged (wrapped between mylar) and the only difference in the rolls is resonant frequency.

(5) RR-179/AL Chaff Roving Bundle. The RR-179/AL Chaff Roving Bundle is used with the AN/ALE-43 Chaff Dispenser Pod. The AN/ALE-43 is equipped with a cutter head and the desired frequency(s) can be dialed in prior to flight. The AN/ALE-43 is tentatively scheduled as the replacement for the AN/ALE-41 system.

(6) RR-181/AL Chaff Countermeasure. The RR-181/AL Chaff Countermeasure is a chaff payload associated with the AN/ALQ-190(V)1 Chaff Countermeasure Set. It is launched from a LAU-133/A container on P-3C, S-3B, SH-60, and EA-6B aircraft, using a JAU-22/B Cartridge. RR-181/AL can be used as a decoy target for hostile missiles, a confusion target for unfriendly search radars, or can provide target coverage (masking), and corridor protection screening.

(7) RR-182/AL Zuni Chaff Warhead. The RR-182/AL Zuni Chaff Warhead is explosively dispersed from a LAU-10 rocket launcher pod. The RR-182/AL can be launched from P-3C, S-3B, , SH-60, and F/A-18E/F aircraft. The inventory objective has been met and the RR-182/AL is no longer in production.

(8) RR-184/AL Chaff Cartridge (Tactical). The RR-184/AL Chaff Cartridge (Tactical) is a passive countermeasure that provides self protection against RF search and track radars, and RF guided missiles and anti-aircraft batteries. The RR-184/AL is a unique chaff countermeasure used with the LAU-138/A Guided Missile Launcher Set. A total of 160 chaff packets are loaded into each LAU-138/A dispenser. Currently, the RR-184/AL is being procured in support of F-14 Aircraft.

(9) RR-189/AL Chaff Cartridge (Training). The RR-189/AL Chaff Cartridge (Training) is a training countermeasure (I band only) used with the LAU-138A/A Guided Missile Launcher Set. Currently the RR-189/AL is used in support of F-14 Aircraft.

c. Radio Frequency Active Countermeasures

(1) AM 6988 Primed Oscillator Expendable Transponder. The AM 6988 Primed Oscillator Expendable Transponder (POET) provides terminal self-defense against a specific threat. POET is no longer in production and will be used as a training device once the RT-1489/ALE Generic Expendable Decoy (GEN-X) inventory requirement is satisfied. The POET is ejected from the AN/ALE-39 or AN/ALE-47 Dispenser with a CCU-63/B or CCU-136/A Impulse Cartridge.

(2) RT-1489/ALE Generic Expendable Decoy. The GEN-X decoy is a small, one shot, expendable terminal RF threat countermeasure which receives an RF signal from a recognized threat such as airborne or land-based semi-active radar guided missiles, then transmits RF power to counter that threat. The GEN-X decoy can be launched from the AN/ALE-39 or AN/ALE-47 Countermeasure Dispensers using a CCU-63/B or CCU-136/A Impulse Cartridge. GEN-X has been designed and cleared for flight on all Navy tactical aircraft.

d. Impulse Cartridges

(1) CCU-41/B Impulse Cartridge. The CCU-41/B Impulse Cartridge provides a power source for the ejection of chaff countermeasures.

(2) CCU-63/B Impulse Cartridge. The CCU-63/B Impulse Cartridge provides a power source for the ejection of IR countermeasures, POET, and GEN-X.

(3) CCU-136/A Impulse Cartridge. The CCU-136/A Impulse Cartridge provides a power source for the ejection of countermeasures in the AN/ALE-47 and AN/ALE-39 dispensers.

(4) CCU-136A/A Hazards of Electromagnetic Radiation To Ordnance Safe Impulse Cartridge. In recognition of the safety problems associated with Hazards of Electromagnetic Radiation to Ordnance (HERO), Program Manager, Air (PMA) 272 tasked Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC) Indian Head with the development of a HERO-safe CCU-136/A impulse cartridge. The performance required of this impulse was, that it shall be HERO-safe, in all potential operating, handling, transporting and storage conditions, and regardless of the intensity of the defined electromagnetic radiation environment onboard ship. This Product Improvement Program (PIP) was built upon the basic design of the CCU-136/A, and is designated as the CCU-136A/A. This impulse cartridge has the same form/fit/function characteristics of the CCU-136/A impulse cartridge and is applicable to AN/ALE-39, AN/ALE-47, and An/ALE-50 CMDS. Initial production of the CCU-136A/A began in Fiscal Year (FY) 99, with Fleet introduction and availability in FY00.

(5) JAU-22/B Impulse Cartridge. The JAU-22/B Impulse Cartridge provides a power source for ejection of countermeasures in the LAU-133/A container.

e. Dispensers

(1) AN/ALE-29A Countermeasure Dispenser Set. The AN/ALE-29A Countermeasure Dispensing Set is an internally mounted dispensing system for use with self-protection countermeasure decoys. Flexibility is provided in selection of system components to permit installation in a large number of different aircraft. The AN/ALE-29A Countermeasure Dispensing Set interfaces with and accepts command signals from the different aircraft cockpit controllers to permit dispensing countermeasures decoys at selectable intervals and quantities.

(2) AN/ALE-37A Chaff Dispensing Pod. The AN/ALE-37A is an externally mounted lightweight unit designed for use on aircraft operating from land or carrier bases. The AN/ALE-37A contains two lightweight chaff modules and has a capacity of 240 individual chaff loads. The AN/ALE-37A is designed for quick reloading using two spare loaded modules with squib boards installed. The chaff is contained in cylindrical shaped containers which are inserted into the pod modules. Each module is loaded with 120 chaff containers and each container is fired by a separate squib. The cockpit control indicator or pod control indicator is used to select the burst rate and firing sequence. All chaff can be dispensed in 30 seconds (at the 1/4 second firing in doubles setting) or spread over eight minutes (at two second firing in singles setting).

(3) AN/ALE-39 Dispenser. The AN/ALE-39 Dispenser has the capability of dispensing up to 60 chaff, flare, or jammer payloads. Payloads may be all one type or a combination of types, but all payloads loaded in each dispenser section must be the same type. All three payload types can be dispensed in either single (manual) or programmed (automatic) mode, independently or concurrently. The payloads can be ejected individually or in preset patterns. The dispenser has the capacity for 30 units in each dispenser.

(4) AN/ALE-41 Chaff Dispenser (Pod). The AN/ALE-41 is a roll type dispenser for chaff corridor seeding and has dipoles rolled between two layers of mylar film into a sandwich approximately 0.2 inches thick, twelve inches wide and 100 feet long. The rolls are unwound in a ram air pressurized external store with the two mylar films separated over a slot in a tube extending out the aft end of the store. The released dipoles are instantly drawn into the tube and continuously ejected from the tube into the boundary layer. No pyrotechnics are involved.

(5) AN/ALE-43(V) Chaff Dispenser (Pod). The AN/ALE-43(V) is a bulk chaff dispenser, which cuts chaff dipoles from fiberglass roving. This dispenser is a pod configuration and has an eight package capacity. The cutting mechanism contains a rubber platen roller and three cutter rollers which yield three in-flight selectable combinations of dipole lengths. The chaff is dispensed when the rovings are drawn simultaneously from each roving package, cut to length and discharged into the wind stream. No pyrotechnics are involved.

(6) AN/ALE-47 Dispenser. The AN/ALE-47 Dispenser is an upgrade to and eventual replacement for the AN/ALE-39 Dispenser. The AN/ALE-47 has the capability of dispensing flares, chaff, non-programmable expendable jammers, and programmable jammers. The system consists of a Cockpit Control Unit, Programmer, Sequencer Switch, and Dispenser Assembly, which will program and eject specific expendable countermeasures in response to various threats.

2. Physical Description

IR COUNTERMEASURE

LENGTH

DIAMETER

BASE FLANGE

MK 46 MOD1C Decoy Flare

5.80 in

1.42 in

1.495 in

MJU-8/B Decoy Flare

5.80 in

1.42 in

1.495 in

MJU-8A/B Decoy Flare

5.80 in

1.42 in

1.495 in

MJU-22/B Decoy Flare

10.50 in

1.42 in

1.495 in

MJU-27/B Decoy Flare

5.80 in

1.42 in

1.495 in

MJU-27A/B Decoy Device

5.80 in

1.42 in

1.495 in

MJU-32/B Decoy Flare

5.80 in

1.42 in

1.495 in

MJU-35/B Decoy Flare

8.10 in

1.42 in

1.495 in

MJU-36/B Decoy Flare

8.10 in

1.42 in

1.495 in

MJU-38/B Decoy Flare

5.80 in

1.42 in

1.495 in

SM-875/ALE Simulator Flare

5.80 in

1.42 in

1.495 in

RF COUNTERMEASURES

LENGTH

DIAMETER

WEIGHT

AN/ALQ-190(V) Chaff Countermeasure Set

39.7 in

5.40 in

34 lbs

RR-129/AL Chaff Cartridge

5.81 in

1.42 in

5.8 oz

RR-144/AL Chaff Cartridge

5.81 in

1.42 in

6.0 oz

RR-171/ -2/ Chaff Rolls

NA

6.32 in

46 lbs

RR-179/AL Roving Chaff Bundle

12.25 in

10.44 in

40 lbs

RR-181/AL Chaff Cartridge

36 in

4.9 in

32 lbs

RR-182/AL Zuni Chaff Warhead

32.25 in

5.13 in

47 lbs

RF COUNTERMEASURES

LENGTH

WIDTH

HEIGHT

WEIGHT

RR-184/AL LAU-138A/A Chaff Cartridge (Tactical)

0.38 in

2.75 in

3.16 in

38.6 g

RR-189/AL LAU-138/A/A Chaff Cartridge (Training)

0.38 in

2.75 in

3.16 in

38.6 g

RF ACTIVE COUNTERMEASURE

LENGTH

DIAMETER

WEIGHT

AM-6988/A Primed Oscillator Expendable Transponder

5.83 in

1.43 in

1.10 lbs

RT-1489 GEN-X

5.80 in

1.35 in

1.10 lbs

IMPULSE CARTRIDGES

LENGTH

DIAMETER

WEIGHT

CCI-41-/B

0.77 in

0.63 in

9.0 g

CCU-63/B

0.73 in

0.63 in

9.0 g

CCU-136/A

0.77 in

0.63 in

9.0 g

JAU-22/B

3.40 in

2.00 in

0.77 lbs

CHAFF DISPENSER

LENGTH

DIAMETER

HEIGHT

AN/ALE-29A

9.75 in

8.25 in

6.35 in

AN/ALE-37/A

86.90 in

7.75 in

5.83 in

AN/ALE/39

8.5 in

6.70 in

10.6 in

AN/ALE-41

131.6 in

19.60 in

5.25 in

AN/ALE-43

166.2 in

19.58 in

19.2 in

AN/ALE-47

9.27 in

7.75 in

5.83 in

3. New Development Introduction

a. MJU-32/B Decoy Flare. A PIP associated with the MK 46 MOD 1C was initiated to improve the integrity of the outer case and provide a safer ignition system. The Engineering Change Proposal (ECP) was signed in June 1996 and production began in fourth quarter FY96. The MK 46 MOD1C will be replaced through attrition by the MJU-32/B.

b. MJU-38/B Decoy Flare. A PIP was initiated on the MJU-8/A Decoy Flare to reduce production costs and enhance safety. The grain configuration was changed for more efficient production while maintaining the existing IR time and intensity profile. The outer case, end cap, and igniter were all modified to enhance safety. The ECP was signed in June 1995 and procurement implemented in FY96. The MJU-8/A Decoy Flare will be replaced through attrition by the MJU-38/B Decoy Flare.

c. SM-875A/ALE Flare Simulator. The SM-875/ALE Flare Simulator, was reconfigured to reduce the number of internal components, enhance flare ignition, and was increased in length to make it the same as all other decoys, ( for better/safe3r visual inspection by ordnance personnel during turnaround operations. This new device, nomenclature SM-875A/ALE is beingwas procured in FY98 for replacement of the current SM-875/ALE simulator Flares.

d. MJU-35/B Decoy Flare. The MJU-35/B Decoy Flare is the nomenclature assigned to a product improvement associated with the MJU-27/B Decoy Flare. The ECP provides for additional payload material to increase the IR output and to allow compatibility with an 8.1 inch dispenser being fitted for the F/A 18 E/F Aircraft. Procurement began in FY98.

e. MJU-36/B Decoy Flare. A product improvement associated with the MJU-8A/B was initiated to provide a higher intensity decoy for the F/A 18E/F Aircraft. The flare uses conventional composition and is 8.1 inches long and 1.42 inches in diameter. Qualification tests were initiated in the fourth quarter FY95 and were completed in the second quarter FY96. Production began the third quarter FY98.

f. MJU-27A/B Decoy Device. The MJU-27A/B Decoy Device is a PIP to the MJU-27/B. This decoy is dispensed from either an AN/ALE-39 or AN/ALE-47 Dispenser using a CCU-63/B or CCU-136/A Impulse Cartridge. The MJU-27A/B is being procured and will replace the MJU-27/B through attrition.

4. Significant Interfaces. Airborne Expendable Countermeasures are launched from AN/ALE-29A, AN/ALE-37A, AN/ALE-39, AN/ALE-41, AN/ALE-43, and AN/ALE-47 Countermeasure Dispensers. With the exception of the LAU-10 and LAU-138/BOL, dispensing is initiated by the firing of an impulse cartridge. These devices are usable with fixed and rotary wing aircraft capable of employing Airborne Expendable Countermeasures. The following shows individual countermeasure devices and associated dispensers, Naval Ammunition Logistic Codes (NALCs), impulse cartridges, and aircraft applications.

INTERFACE MATRIX

COUNTERMEASURE

DISPENSER

NALC

IMPULSE CARTRIDGE

AIRCRAFT APPLICATION

INFRAREDInfrared:

MK46 MOD 1C

AN/ALE-29A

AN/ALE-37A

AN/ALE-39

AN/ALE-47

LW60

CCU-63/B,

CCU-136/A

A/UH-1, , H-46, SH-60, C-130,

P-3C

MJU-8/B

AN/ALE-29A

AN/ALE-37A

AN/ALE-39

AN/ALE-47

LW62

CCU-63/B,

CCU-136/A

Training Asset For Tactical Aircraft

MJU-8A/B

AN/ALE-29A

AN/ALE-37A

AN/ALE-39

AN/ALE-47

2W89

CCU-63B,

CCU-136/A

Training Asset for Tactical Aircraft and H-53

MJU-22/B

AN/ALE-39

LW16

CCU-63/B,

CCU-136/A

EA-6B

MJU-27/B

AN/ALE-29A

AN/ALE-37A

AN/ALE-39

AN/ALE-47

2W11

CCU-63/B,

CCU-136/A

H-46, SH-60, AV-8B, F/A-18D/E/F

MJU-32/B

AN/ALE-39

LA01

CCU-63/B

CCU-136A

A/UH-1, H-46,

H-53, SH-60, P-3C, C-130

MJU-38/B

AN/ALE-39

LA02

CCU-63/B

CCU-136/A

AV-8B, EA-6B,

F-14A/B/D,

F/A-18D/E/F,

S-3B

SM-875/ALE

AN/ALE-29A

AN/ALE-37A

AN/ALE-39

AN/ALE-47

L540

CCU-63/B,

CCU-136/A,

CCU-41/B

All Naval Airframes

Radio ADIO FrequencyREQUENCY::

AN/ALQ-190(V)1

LAU-133

4W60

JAU-1/B, JAU-22/B

SH-60,

P-3C, S-3B

RR-129/AL

AN/ALE-29A

AN/ALE-37A

AN/ALE-39

AN/ALE-47

NW20

CCU-41/B

CCU-136/A

All Naval Airframes

RR-129A/AL

AN/ALE-29A

AN/ALE-37A

AN/ALE-39

AN/ALE-47

DWCF

CCU-41/B

CCU-136/A

All Naval Airframes

RR-144/AL

AN/ALE-29A

AN/ALE-37A

AN/ALE-39

AN/ALE-47

NW-33

CCU-41/B,

CCU-136/A

All Naval Airframes

RR-144A/AL

AN/ALE-29A

AN/ALE-37A

AN/ALE-39

AN/ALE-47

DWCB

CCU-41/B

CCU-136/A

All Naval Airframes

RR-181/AL

LAU-133

4W60

JAU-22/B

P-3C, S-3B, SH-60, EA-6B

RR-182/AL

LAU-10

HW96

NA

SH-60,

P-3C, S-3B,

F/A-18E/F

RR-184/AL

LAU-138A/A

CWCK

NA

F-14A/B/D

RR-189/AL

LAU-138A/A

CWCM

NA

F-14A/B/D

Radio FrequencyREQUENCY Active:

AM-6988

AN/ALE-39

AN/ALE-47

MW94

CCU-63B,

CCU-136/A

Tactical Aircraft

RT-1489/ALE

AN/ALE-39

AN/ALE-47

CWCG

CCU-63B,

CCU-136/A

Tactical Aircraft

5. New Features, Configurations, or Material

a. MJU-32/B Decoy Flare. The MJU-32/B Decoy Flare has an improved outer case integrity and safer ignition system.

b. MJU-38/B Decoy Flare. The MJU-38/B grain configuration was changed for easier productivity while maintaining the existing IR time and intensity profile. The outer case, end cap, and igniter were modified to enhance safety.

c. SM-875/ALE Flare Simulator. The SM-875/ALE Flare Simulator was reconfigured to reduce the number of internal components and enhance flare ignition by modification of the flare ignition material.

H. CONCEPTS

1. Operational Concept. Airborne Expendable Countermeasures are employed by aircrews in various tactical and training applications to protect aircraft from RF or IR guided missile attack.

2. Maintenance Concept. Airborne Expendable Countermeasures and the associated impulse cartridges are, by definition, expendable, having no preventive or corrective maintenance procedures or requirements. However, there are requirements for inspection prior to use, loading, handling, and repackaging at the organizational and intermediate levels of maintenance. Maintenance tasks are identified and assigned by the Naval Ordnance Maintenance Management Program (NOMMP) OPNAVINST 8000.16 Volume 2 Section 2 Procedures and inspection criteria for particular configurations are added to appropriate Weapons Assembly Manuals prior to fleet introduction of decoys and devices.

a. Organizational. Organizational maintenance on countermeasure devices involves inspecting, loading, arming, de-arming, downloading, and reporting discrepancies. Organizational Work Center 230 is manned by Navy Aviation Ordnanceman (AO) personnel with Navy Enlisted Classifications (NEC) 8319, 8819, 8332, 8335, 8342, 8842, 8345, 8845, 8347, 8847, 8377, 8378, or by Marine Corps personnel with Military Occupational Specialties (MOS) 6511 or 6531. Aviation Ordnancemen are not presently assigned to SH-60 LAMPS Detachments. In these Detachments all Group IX ratings holding NEC 8378 and assigned to LAMPS Detachments may be required to perform airborne expendable countermeasures organizational level maintenance tasks. Preflight and postflight inspections consist of performing visual examination of device cases for dents, cracks, corrosion, illegible or incorrect markings, compliance with pertinent Notices of Ammunition Reclassifications, and technical directives. Any devices failing these inspections are forwarded to the intermediate maintenance level for action.

(1) Preventive Maintenance. Not Applicable (NA.)

(2) Corrective Maintenance. There are no corrective maintenance actions performed on Airborne Expendable Countermeasures at the organizational maintenance level.Preflight and postflight inspections consist of performing visual examination of device cases for dents, cracks, corrosion, illegible or incorrect markings, compliance with pertinent Notices of Ammunition Reclassifications, and technical directives. Any devices failing these inspections are forwarded to the intermediate maintenance level for action.

b. Intermediate. There are no preventive maintenance requirements performed at the intermediate maintenance level. Intermediate Maintenance Activities' Weapons Departments (shipboard, Naval Air Station, and Marine Aviation Logistics Squadron) receive expendable countermeasure devices from the appropriate issuing activity. Maintenance is performed by Navy AO personnel with NEC 6802 and Marine Corps personnel with MOS 6541. Routine upkeep maintenance actions for intermediate level activities include:

    • Receipt, handling, storage, and issue
    • Packaging and unpackaging
    • Visual inspection for external damage to case
    • Inspection for illegible or incorrect markings
    • Minor cleaning and corrosion procedures
    • Compliance with pertinent technical directives

Devices requiring maintenance, which exceeds the capabilities of the fleet I-level will have the condition codes reclassified and disposed of in accordance with existing directives.

c. Depot. NA

d. Interim Maintenance. Interim maintenance is not required since the Airborne Expendable Countermeasures are fielded with full Navy organic support available.

e. Life-Cycle Maintenance Plan. Maintenance Plans are generated in support of Airborne Expendable Countermeasures. Shelf-life for Airborne Expendable Countermeasures differs depending upon the device. Chaff and countermeasure devices have an indefinite shelf-life, while RF Active devices and Impulse Cartridges have a five-year and nine-year shelf-life respectively.

3. Manning Concept. Manning concepts for Airborne Expendable Countermeasures are as follows:

a. Aircrew. Airborne Expendable Countermeasures are operated by aircraft pilots and countermeasure system operators. Airborne Expendable Countermeasure systems do not drive any change in aircrew manning.

b. Maintenance. Manpower requirements for Airborne Expendable Countermeasures are compatible with existing skill levels, therefore no new NECs or MOSs will be required. Airborne Expendable Countermeasures do not alter current manning requirements at organizational, intermediate or depot level maintenance activities.

4. Training Concept. The Airborne Expendable Countermeasure Training Program consists of training for maintenance personnel only. No new training courses are required at this time. An Airborne Countermeasures and Associated Impulse Cartridges safety lesson has been developed and will be incorporated into certain existing courses. This lesson will have no impact on course length or student throughput.

a. Initial Training. No initial training for Airborne Expendable Countermeasures is required for this NTSP.

b. Follow-on Training. An Airborne Countermeasures and Associated Impulse Cartridges safety lesson has been developed and will be incorporated into the following courses with minimal impact:

COURSE NUMBER

COURSE TITLE

TRACK NUMBER

C-646-9962

F-14A/B Armament Systems Initial Organizational Maintenance

D-646-1647

C-646-4109

Air Launched Weapons Ordnance General

D/E-646-7007

C-646-9571

P-3C Armament/Ordnance Systems Initial Organizational Maintenance

D-646-1042

C-646-3105

Aviation Ordnance Intermediate Maintenance Technician

M-646-7026

C-646-3106

Rotary Wing Armament Organizational Level Differences

NA

C-646-9361

H-1 Armament Repair Integrated Organizational Maintenance

M-646-2044

C-102-9404

SH-3H Communications/Navigation Systems Initial Organizational Maintenance

D-102-0521

Q-4E-0010

Aviation Ordnance Officer Career Progression Level 1

NA

E-646-0640

F/A-18 Conventional Weapons

D/E-646-0653

C-646-3680

S-3B Conventional Weapons Release Checks and Loading

NA

D-646-1644

F-14A/B Conventional Weapons Loading Team

NA

D-646-1646

F-14D Conventional Weapons Release Checks and Loading

NA

C-646-9409

H-60 Conventional Weapons Loading Course

NA

D-646-1143

P3C Conventional Weapons Loading and Release and Control

NA

E-646-1842

EA-6B Aircraft AGM-88 (HARM) Loading and System

NA

A-431-0012

Explosive Ordnance Phase 2

NA

c. Student Profiles

SKILL IDENTIFIER

PREREQUISITE

SKILL AND KNOWLEDGE REQUIREMENTS

MOS 6531

  • C-646-2011, Aviation Ordnanceman Class A1
  • C-646-2012, Aviation Ordnanceman Navy Difference Training

MOS 6541

  • C-646-2011, Aviation Ordnanceman Class A1
  • C-646-2012, Aviation Ordnanceman Navy Difference Training

AO

  • C-646-2011, Aviation Ordnanceman Class A1
  • C-646-2012, Aviation Ordnanceman Navy Difference Training
  • C-646-2013, Aviation Ordnanceman Ships Company Strand Class A1

AO 8319

  • C-646-2011, Aviation Ordnanceman Class A1
  • C-646-2012, Aviation Ordnanceman Navy Difference Training
  • D-646-1042, P-3 Initial Armament Systems Organizational Maintenance

AO 8819

  • C-646-2011, Aviation Ordnanceman Class A1
  • C-646-2012, Aviation Ordnanceman Navy Difference Training

AO 8332

  • C-646-2011, Aviation Ordnanceman Class A1
  • C-646-2012, Aviation Ordnanceman Navy Difference Training

AO 8335

  • C-646-2011, Aviation Ordnanceman Class A1
  • C-646-2012, Aviation Ordnanceman Navy Difference Training
  • D-646-1647, F-14 Armament Systems Initial Organizational Maintenance

AO 8342

  • C-646-2011, Aviation Ordnanceman Class A1
  • C-646-2012, Aviation Ordnanceman Navy Difference Training
  • E-646-9973, F/A-18 Armament Systems Initial Organizational Maintenance

AO 8842

  • C-646-2011, Aviation Ordnanceman Class A1
  • C-646-2012, Aviation Ordnanceman Navy Difference Training

AO 8345

  • C-646-2011, Aviation Ordnanceman Class A1
  • C-646-2012, Aviation Ordnanceman Navy Difference Training
  • D-646-1647, F-14 Armament Systems Initial Organizational Maintenance

AO 8845

  • C-646-2011, Aviation Ordnanceman Class A1
  • C-646-2012, Aviation Ordnanceman Navy Difference Training

AO 8347

  • C-646-2011, Aviation Ordnanceman Class A1
  • C-646-2012, Aviation Ordnanceman Navy Difference Training
  • D-646-1746, S-3B Initial Armament Systems Organizational Maintenance

AO 8847

  • C-646-2011, Aviation Ordnanceman Class A1
  • C-646-2012, Aviation Ordnanceman Navy Difference Training

AO 8377

  • C-646-2011, Aviation Ordnanceman Class A1
  • C-646-2012, Aviation Ordnanceman Navy Difference Training

AO 8378

  • C-646-2011, Aviation Ordnanceman Class A1
  • C-646-2012, Aviation Ordnanceman Navy Difference Training

d. Training Pipelines. There are no new training pipelines or tracks associated with Airborne Expendable Countermeasures.

I. ON-BOARD (IN-SERVICE) TRAINING

1. Proficiency or Other Training Organic to the New Development. Airborne Expendable Countermeasures proficiency training is conducted during loading and downloading drills, and on-the-job training to maintain proficiency.

a. Maintenance Training Improvement Program. The Maintenance Training Improvement Program (MTIP) is used to establish an effective and efficient training system responsive to fleet training requirements. MTIP is a training management tool that, through diagnostic testing, identifies individual training deficiencies at the organizational and intermediate levels of maintenance. MTIP was implemented per OPNAVINST 4790.2 series. MTIP will be replaced by the Aviation Maintenance Training Continuum System (AMTCS). Current planning is for AMTCS to begin full implementation for fleet deployment in March 2001.

b. Aviation Maintenance Training Continuum System. AMTCS will provide career path training to the Sailor or Marine from their initial service entry to the end of their military career. AMTCS is planned to be an integrated system that will satisfy the training and administrative requirements of both the individual and the organization. The benefits will be manifested in the increased effectiveness of the technicians and the increased efficiencies of the management of the training business process. By capitalizing on technological advances and integrating systems and processes where appropriate, the right amount of training can be provided at the right time, thus meeting the CNO's mandated "just-in-time" training approach.

Technology investments enable the development of several state-of-the-art training and administrative tools: Interactive Multimedia Instruction (IMI) for the technicians in the Fleet in the form of Interactive Courseware (ICW) with Computer Managed Instruction (CMI) and Computer Aided Instruction (CAI) for the schoolhouse.

Included in the AMTCS development effort is the Aviation Maintenance Training Continuum System - Software Module (ASM) which provides testing [Test and Evaluation (TEV)], recording [Electronic Training Jacket (ETJ)], and a Feedback system. The core functionality of these AMTCS tools are based and designed around the actual maintenance-related tasks the technicians perform, and the tasks are stored and maintained in a Master Task List (MTL) data bank. These tools are procured and fielded with appropriate Commercial Off The Shelf hardware and software, i.e., Fleet Training Devices (FTD) - Laptops, Personal Computers, Electronic Classrooms (ECR), Learning Resource Centers (LRC), operating software, and network software and hardware.

Upon receipt of direction from OPNAV (N789H), AMTCS is to be implemented and the new tools integrated into the daily training environment of all participating aviation activities and supporting elements. AMTCS will serve as the standard training system for aviation maintenance training within the Navy and Marine Corps, and is planned to supersede the existing MTIP and Maintenance Training Management and Evaluation Program (MATMEP) programs. AMTCS implementation will begin with the F-14, E-2C, and all models F/A-18 aircraft. For more information on AMTCS refer to PMA205-3D3.

a. Maintenance Training Improvement Program. The Maintenance Training Improvement Program (MTIP) may be used to establish an effective and efficient training system that is responsive to fleet training requirements. MTIP is a training management tool that, through diagnostic testing, identifies individual training deficiencies at both the organizational and intermediate levels of maintenance. MTIP is the comprehensive testing of one's knowledge. It consists of a bank of test questions that are managed through automated data processing. The Deputy Chief of Staff for Training will assist in the development of MTIP by providing those question banks (software) already developed by the Navy. MTIP will be implemented per OPNAVINST 4790.2G. MTIP will allow increased effectiveness in the application of training resources through identification of skills and knowledge deficiencies at the activity, work center, or individual technician level. Remedial training will be concentrated where needed to combat identified skill and knowledge shortfalls.

b. Aviation Maintenance In-Service Training. Aviation Maintenance In-Service Training (AMIST) is intended to support the Fleet training requirements now satisfied by MTIP, and in that sense is the planned replacement. However, it is structured very differently, and will function as an integral part of the new Aviation Maintenance Training Continuum System (AMTCS) that will replace the existing aviation maintenance training structure. AMIST will provide standardized instruction to bridge the training gaps between initial and career training. With the implementation of AMIST, the technician will be provided the training required to maintain a level of proficiency necessary to effectively perform the required tasks to reflect career progression.

AMTCS redesigns the aviation training process (training continuum), and introduces Computer-Based Training (CBT) throughout the Navy technical training process. The application and adoption of recent advances in computer hardware and software technology have enabled CBT with its basic elements of Computer Managed Instruction, Computer Aided Instruction, and Interactive Courseware to be integrated into the training continuum and provide essential support for standardizing technical training.

2. Personnel Qualification Standards. NA

3. Other On-Board or In-service Training Packages. Marine Corps onboard training is based on the current series of MCO P4790.12, Individual Training Standards System and Maintenance Training MATMEP. This program is designed to meet Marine Corps, as well as Navy OPNAVINST 4790.2 series, maintenance training requirements. It is a performance-based, standardized, level-progressive, documentable, training management and evaluation program. It identifies and prioritizes task inventories by MOS through a front-end analysis process that identifies task, skill, and knowledge requirements of each MOS. MTIP questions coupled to MATMEP tasks will help identify training deficiencies that can be enhanced with refresher training. (MATMEP is planned to be replaced by AMTCS.) Marine Corps on-board training is based on the current series of MCO P4790.12, Individual Training Standards System and Marine Training Management Evaluation Program (MATMEP). This program is designed to meet Marine Corps, as well as Navy OPNAVINST 4790.2G, maintenance training requirements. It is a performance-based, standardized, level-progressive, documentable, training management and evaluation program. It identifies and prioritizes task inventories by MOS through a front-end analysis process that identifies task, skill, and knowledge requirements of each MOS. MTIP questions coupled to MATMEP tasks will help identify training deficiencies that can be addressed with remedial training.

 

J. LOGISTICS SUPPORT

1. Manufacturer and Contract Numbers. Airborne Expendable Countermeasures are competitively procured from a variety of manufacturers. For a complete list of contractors, contact Program Executive Officer (Tactical Aircraft Programs) (PEO(T)) PMA 272J3.

2. Program Documentation

NOMENCLATURE

PLAN NUMBER

DATE

Flare, Decoy, MK 46 MOD 1C

ARMP - 0118

Apr 88

Flare, Decoy, MJU-8A/B

ARMP - 0124

Apr 92

Flare, Decoy, MJU-8/B

ARMP - 0120

Apr 88

Flare, Decoy, MJU-22/B

ARMP - 0121

Apr 92

Flare, Decoy, MJU-27/B

ARMP - 0403

Aug 94

Flare, Decoy, MJU-32/B

ARMP - 0406

Aug 95

Flare, Decoy, MJU-38/B

ARMP - 0405

Aug 95

Decoy, XPNDR, RT1489/ALE

ARMP - 0232

Oct 95

Simulator, Flare, SM-875/ALE

ARMP - 0166

Apr 92

Decoy, Transponder, Countermeasures,

RT-1489/ALE

ARM - 101 Revision E

Aug 96

Integrated Logistic Support Plan (ILSP) for D-46/ALE39 Dispenser, Countermeasures Chaff (RR-184/RR189)

ARM-ILSP-203

Aug 97

ILSP for Generic Expendable (GEN-X)

ARM-ILSP 101

Aug 96

InfraredIR Expendable Countermeasures

CM-ILSP-346

Sep 95

Chaff Countermeasures Set,

AN/ALQ-190(V)1

ARM - 079 Revision B

Jan 90

3. Technical Data Plan. The responsibility for quality assurance of technical manuals resides at the Naval Air Technical Data and Engineering Service Command and is exercised through their Quality Assurance department Code 04. Routine technical manual changes are issued through normal update procedures

4. Test Sets, Tools, and Test Equipment. NA

5. Repair Parts. NA

6. Human Systems Integration. NA

K. SCHEDULES. Airborne Expendable Countermeasures have been delivered to all user activities.

1. Installation and Delivery Schedules. NAAirborne Expendable Countermeasures are already in the fleet.

2. Ready For Operational Use Schedule. All Airborne Expendable Countermeasures are considered Ready For Operational Use upon installation on the aircraft.

3. Time Required to Install at Operational Sites. Airborne Expendable Countermeasures are installed in aircraft by weapons loading teams/team-members in a matter of minutes.

4. Foreign Military Sales and Other Source Delivery Schedule. Information regarding Foreign Military Sales of Airborne Expendable Countermeasures should be directed to PEO(T) PMA272-J3.

5. Training Device and Technical Training Equipment Delivery Schedule. Technical Training Equipment (TTE) consisting of an Airborne Countermeasures Display Case and a Chaff Countermeasures Set, Inert, AN/ALQ-190(V)1, as shown in Part IV.A.1 of this NTSP, has been delivered to various training activities and is on board. This TTE supports the Countermeasures and Associated Impulse Cartridges safety lesson being incorporated in specific ordnance training courses. No Training Devices are required for this lesson.

TECHNICAL TRAINING EQUIPMENT DELIVERY SCHEDULE

EQUIPMENT

ACTIVITY / LOCATION

Airborne Countermeasure Display Case

Maintenance Training Unit (MTU) 1007, Naval Air Maintenance Training Unit (NAMTRAU) Oceana

Airborne Countermeasure Display Case Inert Chaff Countermeasure Set, AN/ALQ-190(V)1

MTU-4030, NAMTRAU Mayport

Airborne Countermeasure Display Case

MTU-1012, NAMTRAU Whidbey Island

Airborne Countermeasure Display Case

FREST VMAT-203, MCAS Cherry Point

Airborne Countermeasure Display Case

FREST VMAT-303, MCAS Camp Pendleton

Airborne Countermeasure Display Case Inert Chaff Countermeasure Set, AN/ALQ-190(V)1

MTU-1005, NAMTRAU Jacksonville

Airborne Countermeasure Display Case

MTU-4032, NAMTRAU Norfolk

Airborne Countermeasure Display Case Inert Chaff Countermeasure Set, AN/ALQ-190(V)1

MTU-4033, NAMTRAU North Island

Airborne Countermeasure Display Case

Aviation Ordnance Officer Career Progression, NAS Pensacola

Airborne Countermeasure Display Case

Strike Fighter Weapons School, NAS Lemoore

Airborne Countermeasure Display Case Inert Chaff Countermeasure Set, AN/ALQ-190(V)

Strike Fighter Weapons School, NAS Oceana

Airborne Countermeasure Display Case

Strike Weapon Attack Training School Atlantic, NAS Oceana

Airborne Countermeasure Display Case

Electronic Combat Weapons School, NAS Whidbey Island

Airborne Countermeasure Display Case

NAVSCOLEOD, NSWC Indian Head

L. GOVERNMENT FURNISHED EQUIPMENT AND CONTRACTOR FURNISHED EQUIPMENT TRAINING REQUIREMENTS. NA

M. RELATED NTSPs AND OTHER APPLICABLE DOCUMENTS

DOCUMENT OR NTSP TITLE

DOCUMENT OR NTSP NUMBER

PDA CODE

STATUS

Pyrotechnic Screening, Marking and Countermeasure Devices

NAVAIR 11-15-7 / NAVSEA SW050-AB-MMA-10

NSWC Crane Code 40

Updated

Oct 96

Decoy Flare Descriptive and Operational Instructions

NAVAIR 11-15-4 (C)

NSWC Crane Code 40

Updated

Oct 97

Ordnance Data for Toxic Hazards Associated with Pyrotechnic Items

NAVAIR 11-5-8 / NAVSEA SW050-AC-ORD-010

NSWC Crane Code 40

Updated

Sep 96

Expendable Countermeasure Directory

NAVAIR 16-1-539 (S)

PMA272-J3

Updated

Sep 94

Airborne Weapons Assembly Manual Pyrotechnics

NAVAIR 11-140-7

PMA272-J3

Updated

Dec 97

Ship Weapons Installation Manual Airborne Pyrotechnics

NAVAIR 11-120-20

NSWC Crane Code 40

Draft 1999

Technical Manual for Cartridge and Propellant Actuated Devices

NAVAIR 11-100-1.1-CD

NSWC Indian Head

Code 5320G

1Mar 1999

Airborne Weapons/Stores Publications Index

NAVAIR 01-700

NAWC China Lake

Code C26303

Updated

Apr 00

Launcher Test Set, Guided Missile LAU-138/A/A

NAVAIR 11-75-84

PMA272-J3

Updated

Jul 97

Hazards of Electromagnetic Radiation to Ordnance (HERO)

NAVAIR 16-1-529 /NAVSEA OP3565

NAVSEA Code 665

Updated

Jan 92

Test Set LAU-138

NAVAIR 16-30-ULM 5-1

PMA272-J3

Updated

Apr 96

Countermeasures Chaff Dispensing Set, AN/ALE-29A

NAVAIR 16-30 ALE29-3

PMA272-J1

Approved Apr 79

Countermeasures Chaff Dispensing Set, AN/ALE-37-1

NAVAIR 16-30 ALE37-1

PMA272-J1

Approved Mar 75

Countermeasures Dispensing System, AN/ALE-39

NAVAIR 16-30 ALE39-1

PMA272-J1

Approved May 94

Countermeasures Chaff Dispensing Set, AN/ALE-47-1

NAVAIR 16-30 ALE47-1

PMA272-J1

Approved

ILSP for InfraredIR Expendable Countermeasures (Revision C)

CM-ILSP-346

PMA272-J

Approved Sep 97

ILSP for Generic Expendable (GEN-X)

ARM-ILSP-101

PMA222

Approved Aug 96

ILSP for D-46/ALE39 Dispenser, Countermeasures Chaff

(RR-184/RR189)

ARM-ILSP-203

PMA272-J3

Approved Oct 97

AN/ALQ-190 (V)

NAVAIR 11-120-63

PMA272-J1

Updated

Jul 91

Generic Expendable (GEN-X)

NAVAIR 11-120-69

PMA272-J1

Issued

Dec 95



NEWSLETTER
Join the GlobalSecurity.org mailing list