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FIELD MANUAL

HEADQUARTERS

NO. 3-21.94

DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY

 

WASHINGTON, DC, 18 APRIL 2003


FM 3-21.94

THE STRYKER BRIGADE COMBAT TEAM INFANTRY BATTALION RECONNAISSANCE PLATOON

CONTENTS

COVER

PREFACE

CHAPTER 1. OVERVIEW OF THE SBCT INFANTRY BATTALION RECONNAISSANCE PLATOON

Section

I.   Capabilities, Limitations, Organization, and Responsibilities

 

1-1. Capabilities

 

1-2. Limitations

 

1-3. Organization

 

1-4. Reconnaissance Sections and Teams

 

1-5. Dismounted Organizations

 

1-6. Mounted Organizations

 

1-7. Responsibilities

Section

II.   Combat Power and Considerations for Employment and Training

 

1-8. Combat Power

 

1-9. Considerations for Employment

 

1-10. Training Considerations

CHAPTER 2. BATTLE COMMAND AND TROOP-LEADING PROCEDURES

Section

I.   Command and Control

 

2-1. Leadership

 

2-2. Mission-Oriented Command and Control

Section

II.   Plans and Orders

 

2-3. Mission Statement

 

2-4. Combat Orders

Section

III.   Troop-Leading Procedures and Techniques

 

2-5. Receive the Mission

 

2-6. Issue a Warning Order

 

2-7. Make a Tentative Plan

 

2-8. Initiate Movement

 

2-9. Conduct a Leader's Reconnaissance

 

2-10. Complete the Plan

 

2-11. Issue the Operations Order

 

2-12. Supervise and Refine

CHAPTER 3. MOVEMENT

 

3-1. Navigation and Route Planning

 

3-2. Movement Formations

 

3-3. Movement Techniques

 

3-4. Actions on Contact

 

3-5. Actions at Danger Areas

 

3-6. Infiltration

 

3-7. Exfiltration

CHAPTER 4. RECONNAISSANCE

Section

I.   Purpose and Fundamentals

 

4-1. Orient on the Reconnaissance Objective

 

4-2. Maintain Tempo and Focus

 

4-3. Report All Information Rapidly and Accurately

 

4-4. Retain Freedom to Maneuver

 

4-5. Establish and Maintain Enemy Contact

 

4-6. Develop Situation Rapidly

 

4-7. Acquire All Required Information

 

4-8. Avoid Detection

 

4-9. Employ Security Measures

 

4-10. Utilize Sensory Techniques

Section

II.   Planning

 

4-11. Planning, Methods, and Employment of Reconnaissance Forces

 

4-12. Reconnaissance Methods

 

4-13. Rehearsals

 

4-14. Essential Planning Considerations

Section

III.   Reconnaissance and Surveillance Handover

 

4-15. Reason for Surveillance Handover

 

4-16. Additional Missions

 

4-17. Digital Systems

Section

IV.   Area Reconnaissance

 

4-18. Tasks

 

4-19. Mounted Techniques

 

4-20. Dismounted Techniques

 

4-21. Objective Rally Point

 

4-22. Leader's Reconnaissance

 

4-23. Actions at the Objective

 

4-24. Withdrawal and Dissemination of Information

Section

V.   Zone Reconnaissance

 

4-25. Tasks

 

4-26. Mounted Reconnaissance Techniques

 

4-27. Dismounted Zone Reconnaissance Techniques

 

4-28. Dismounted Reconnaissance Methods

Section

VI.   Route Reconnaissance

 

4-29. Purpose

 

4-30. Organization

 

4-31. Stealth and Speed

 

4-32. Movement near Roads

 

4-33. Engineer Support

 

4-34. Route Reconnaissance Overlay

 

4-35. Employment Considerations

 

4-36. Key Tasks

 

4-37. Techniques

Section

VII.   Urban Reconnaissance

 

4-38. Employ Dismounted Surveillance Teams

 

4-39. Urban Patrolling

 

4-40. Assessment of the Area of Operations

 

4-41. End State

Section

VIII.   Reconnaissance of Obstacles and Restrictions

 

4-42. Types of Obstacles and Restrictions

 

4-43. Tasks

 

4-44. Elements of Obstacle Reconnaissance

CHAPTER 5. SECURITY OPERATIONS

Section

I.   Purpose and Fundamentals

 

5-1. Purpose

 

5-2. Fundamentals

 

5-3. Planning Considerations

Section

II.   Screening Missions

 

5-4. Fundamentals

 

5-5. Sequencing and Prioritization

 

5-6. Surveillance Techniques

 

5-7. Counterreconnaissance Techniques

Section

III.   Area Security Operations

 

5-8. High-Value Targets

 

5-9. Convoy and Route Security

Section

IV.   Observation Post Employment

 

5-10. Critical Tasks

 

5-11. Types of Observation Posts

 

5-12. Observation Post Positions

 

5-13. Observation Post Site Selection

 

5-14. Occupation of the Observation Post

 

5-15. Manning the Observation Post

 

5-16. Position Improvement

 

5-17. Communications

 

5-18. Observation Post Security

 

5-19. Active Patrolling

 

5-20. Extended Observation Posts

Section

V.   Construction Techniques

 

5-21. Dirt Removal

 

5-22. Natural Vegetation

 

5-23. Sidewall Support

 

5-24. Observation Post Kits

Section

VI.   Observation Post Employment in Operational Environments

 

5-25. Urban Environment

 

5-26. Mountainous Environment

 

5-27. Types of Ground Observation Posts

 

5-28. Checkpoints, Roadblocks, and Observations Posts

CHAPTER 6. URBAN ENVIRONMENT

Section

I.   Understanding the Urban Environment

 

6-1. Definitions

 

6-2. Characteristics of the Urban Environment

Section

II.   Planning

 

6-3. Collect and Analyze Existing Intelligence

 

6-4. Develop the Plan

Section

III.   Execution

 

6-5. Approach the Urban Area of Operations

 

6-6. Employ Dismounted Surveillance Teams

 

6-7. Conduct Reconnaissance

 

6-8. Assess the Area of Operations

 

6-9. End State

Section

IV.   Combat Multipliers

 

6-10. Armored Vehicles

 

6-11. Engineers

 

6-12. Attack Helicopters

 

6-13. Antiarmor Weapons

 

6-14. Sniper Employment Considerations

CHAPTER 7. TACTICAL ENABLING OPERATIONS

 

7-1. Linkup Operations

 

7-2. Passage of Lines

 

7-3. Relief in Place

 

7-4. Stay-Behind Operations

 

7-5. Air Assault Operations

 

7-6. Assembly Area Operations

CHAPTER 8. COMBAT SUPPORT

Section

I.   Fire Support

 

8-1. Fire Planning

 

8-2. Linking Fire Support Tasks and Maneuver Purpose

Section

II.   Indirect Fire Support

 

8-3. Fire-Planning Process

 

8-4. Call for Fire

 

8-5. Adjust Fire

 

8-6. Mortar Support

 

8-7. Field Artillery Support

 

8-8. Fire Direction Assets

 

8-9. Fire Request Channels

 

8-10. Close Air Support

 

8-11. Attack Helicopters

Section

III.   Combat Engineer Support

 

8-12. Medium Engineer Company

 

8-13. Engineer Missions

 

8-14. Mobility

 

8-15. Countermobility

 

8-16. Survivability

 

8-17. Reconnaissance Operations

Section

IV.   Air Defense

 

8-18. Systems, Organization, and Capabilities

 

8-19. Employment of Air Defense Systems

 

8-20. Weapons Control Status

 

8-21. Early Warning Procedures

 

8-22. Reaction Procedures

Section

V.   Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Support

 

8-23. Reconnaissance Support

 

8-24. Decontamination Support

CHAPTER 9. COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT

 

9-1. Organization

 

9-2. Individual Responsibilities

 

9-3. Planning Considerations

 

9-4. Resupply Operations

 

9-5. Aerial Sustainment

 

9-6. Soldier's Load

 

9-7. Combat Load and Basic Load

 

9-8. Maintenance

 

9-9. Recovery and Destruction

 

9-10. Evacuation Procedures

 

9-11. Administration

 

9-12. Medical Support

 

9-13. Prisoners of War

CHAPTER 10. PATROLLING

Section

I.   General

 

10-1. Organization

 

10-2. Initial Planning

 

10-3. Completion of the Plan

 

10-4. Depart from Friendly Lines

 

10-5. Patrol Bases

 

10-6. Rally Points

 

10-7. Leader's Reconnaissance

 

10-8. Reentry of Friendly Lines

 

10-9. Debrief

Section

II.   Types of Patrols

 

10-10. Reconnaissance Patrol

 

10-11. Combat Patrol

 

10-12. Presence Patrol


APPENDIX A.

RECONNAISSANCE OVERLAYS, SYMBOLS, AND FORMULAS
APPENDIX B. LIMITED VISIBILITY OPERATIONS
APPENDIX C. RISK MANAGEMENT
APPENDIX D. FRATRICIDE AVOIDANCE
APPENDIX E. NUCLEAR, BIOLOGICAL, OR CHEMICAL ENVIRONMENT OPERATIONS
APPENDIX F. JAVELIN EMPLOYMENT
APPENDIX G. M240B MACHINE GUN AND M249 SAW EMPLOYMENT
  
  GLOSSARY
  REFERENCES
  AUTHENTICATION



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