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Military

Field Manual
NO. 1-111
*FM 1-111

HEADQUARTERS
DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY
WASHINGTON, DC, 27 October 1997

 

AVIATION BRIGADES


CONTENTS

Preface

Chapter 1. Doctrine Fundamentals, Missions, and Organization

SECTION I. Army Aviation Operations Doctrine

1-1. Doctrine Fundamentals

1-2. Tenets of Army Aviation Doctrine

SECTION II. Aviation Brigade Missions

1-3. Missions

1-4. Capabilities

1-5. Limitations

SECTION III. Organizational Structures

1-6. Theater Aviation Brigades

1-7. Corps Aviation Brigade

1-8. Division Aviation Brigades

Chapter 2. Battle Command

SECTION I. General Principles

2-1. Concept of Battle Command

2-2. Organization of Battle Command

SECTION II. Facilities and Operations

2-3. Command and Control Facilities

2-4. Main Command Post

2-5. Tactical Command Post

2-6. Tactical Operations Center Operations

2-7. Brigade Rear Command Post

2-8. Alternate Tactical Operations Center

2-9. Brigade Support Area

SECTION III. Command Communications Systems

2-10. Command Responsibilities

2-11. Signal Support

2-12. Unit/Staff Responsibilities

2-13. Command Communications Systems Architecture

2-14. Transmission Limitations

2-15. Brigade Radio Nets

2-16. Additional Communication Means

2-17. Liaison Operations

SECTION IV. Command And Control Warfare

2-18. Operations Security

2-19. Countermeasures

2-20. Military Deception

2-21. Electronic Warfare

2-22. Physical Destruction

2-23. Psychological Operations

Chapter 3. Employment

SECTION I. Aviation Operation Principles

3-1. General Principles

3-2. Applying Operational Principles

SECTION II. Planning Considerations

3-3. Planning Aviation Operations

3-4. Higher Commander's Intent

3-5. Mission, Enemy, Terrain, Troops, and Time Available

SECTION III. Task Organization

3-6. Task-Organizing

3-7. Synchronization of Aviation Brigade Assets

3-8. Command and Support Relationships

SECTION IV. Employment Principles

3-9. Aviation Brigade Contributions

3-10. Employment of Aviation Assets

SECTION V. Employment Roles

3-11. Major Roles and Functions

3-12. Combat Operations

3-13. Combat Support Operations

3-14. Combat Service Support Operations

SECTION VI. Battlespace

3-15. Concept of Battlespace

3-16. Shaping the Battlespace

SECTION VII. Simultaneous Attack In Depth

3-17. Concept

3-18. Synchronization of Close, Deep, and Rear Operations

3-19. Close Operations

3-20. Deep Operations

3-21. Rear Operations

SECTION VIII. Planning And Executing Close, Deep, And Rear Operations

3-22. Battlefield Framework

3-23. Targeting Process

3-24. Task Organization

3-25. Battle Command

3-26. Close and Deep Planning Actions

3-27. Close and Deep Execution Actions

3-28. Rear Area Planning and Execution

SECTION IX. Corps Airfields Operations

3-29. Corps Airfield Participants

3-30. Corps Airfield Responsibilities

SECTION X. Covering Force Operations

3-31. Corps Covering Force

3-32. Division (Defense) Covering Force

3-33. Division (Offense) Covering Force

SECTION XI. OFFENSIVE OPERATIONS

3-34. Movement to Contact

3-35. Hasty Attack

3-36. Deliberate Attack

3-37. Exploitation

3-38. Pursuit

SECTION XII. Defensive Operations

3-39. Mobile Defense

3-40. Area Defense

SECTION XIII. Special-Purpose Operations

3-41. Reconnaissance-In-Force

3-42. Raids

3-43. Deception Operations

3-44. Search and Attack

SECTION XIV. Division Reserves

3-45. Division Reserve Mission

3-46. Nature of Reserve Forces

3-47. Aviation as a Reserve

3-48. Attack Helicopter Battalions

3-49. Assault Helicopter Battalions

Chapter 4. Joint and Combined Arms Operations

4-1. Fire Support

4-2. JSEAD Operations

4-3. Air Operations

4-4. Engineer Support

4-5. Air Defense

4-6. Intelligence and Electronic Warfare Support Operations

4-7. Joint Intelligence Gathering Assets

4-8. Corps and Division Aerial Intelligence and Electronic WarfareAssets

4-9. Additional Intelligence Gathering Assets

4-10. Air Traffic Services

4-11. Weather Support

4-12. Signal Support

4-13. Military Police Support

4-14. Chemical Support

Chapter 5. Combat Service Support

SECTION I. Logistics Principles

5-1. CSS Planning

5-2. CSS Organization

SECTION II. Army Logistics SupportGroups, Elements, And Commands

5-3. Logistics Support Group

5-4. Logistics Support Element

5-5. Corps Support Command

5-6. Division Support Command

SECTION III. Supply Operations

5-7. Classes of Supply

5-8. Categories of Supply

5-9. Methods of Distribution

5-10. Requisition and Distribution of Supplies

5-11. Support by Host Nation

SECTION IV. Maintenance Operations

5-12.Maintenance Principles

5-13. Vehicle and Equipment Maintenance and Recovery

5-14. Vehicle and Equipment Recovery Procedures

5-15. Aviation Maintenance

5-16. Support System Structure

5-17. Aviation Unit Maintenance

5-18. Aircraft Recovery Operations

5-19. Aviation Unit Maintenance Mobility

5-20. Aviation Intermediate Maintenance

5-21. Aviation Intermediate Maintenance Mobility

5-22. Night Aircraft Maintenance

5-23. Maintenance in Unusual Environments

5-24. Transportation Principles

5-25. Unit Movements and Transportation

SECTION V. Personnel Service Support

5-26. Personnel Service Support Principles

5-27. Field Services

Appendix A. AVIATION-GROUND TASK FORCES

Appendix B. RISK MANAGEMENT

Appendix C. NUCLEAR, BIOLOGICAL, AND CHEMICAL OPERATIONS

Appendix D. COMBAT SEARCH AND RESCUE

Appendix E. SELF-DEPLOYMENT

Appendix F. STABILITY AND SUPPORT OPERATIONS

Appendix G. DEEP OPERATIONS

Appendix H. ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERNS AND COMPLIANCE

Appendix I. SHIPBOARD OPERATIONS

Appendix J. FORWARD ARMING AND REFUELING POINTS

Appendix K. ARMY SPECIAL OPERATIONS AVIATION

Appendix L. MINE WARFARE AWARENESS

GLOSSARY

REFERENCES

AUTHORIZATION


Unless otherwise stated, when the masculine gender is used, both men and women are included.

This publication has been reviewed for OPSEC considerations.


DISTRIBUTION RESTRICTION: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.

*This publication supersedes FM 1-111, Aviation Brigades, 27 August 1990; and FM 1-104, Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures for Forward Arming and Refueling Points, 12 September 1994.



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