Military


Naval Communications Station, Guam
NCTAMS WESTPAC (Guam)

The mission of the Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station [NCTS] is to provide continuous global and universal communications services to fleet units, shore activites, and joint forces. Base level communications include all facilities and services required to support electromagnetic dissemination, transmission or reception of voice, data, video, integrated telecommunications within the confines of a post, camp, station, base, installation, headquarters, or metropolitan area to include local interconnect trunks to the first serving commercial central office or military long-haul or tactical gateway.

The Common User Digital Information Exchange System [CUDIXS] is a shore-based, computer controlled, message store and forward system that automates the message exchange between ship/shore/ship. CUDIXS uses the Ultra-High Frequency (UHF) satellite link resources of the Fleet Satellite Communications (FLTSATCOM) system, and provides full network control for the message transfers between the CUDIXS shore station and network shipboard subscribers operating in its area of responsibility. A single CUDIXS can support a maximum of 60 subscribers. Currently there are four CUDIXS sites around the world. NCTS Guam is used as a fallback contingency site and becomes operational when NCTAMS EURCENT and NCTAMS PAC experience high-tempo operations or a NAVCOMPARS failure. In Guam, the AUTOVON switch at Finegayan Bay was replaced with an Stand Alone (SA) digital switch in 1985.

NAVSOC remote TT&C facilities include Laguna Peak near Point Mugu; CA, Detachment ALFA at Prospect Harbor, Maine; and Detachment CHARLIE at Finegayan, Guam. The Navy also conducts TT&C operations from Blossom Point, MD, and Quantico, VA.

State Department antennas are located at Barrigada and Finegayan,

Andersen personnel have been authorized access to excess Navy housing in the South Finegayan housing community, which is controlled by Naval Communications and Telecommunications Center near Andersen. It is approximately a 15 minute drive to Andersen AFB and is easy to commute. The South Finegayan community is mixed Naval officers and enlisted personnel from various disciplines, including Naval Hospital personnel. All personnel assigned to Andersen will be offered the opportunity to accept South Finegayan housing when Andersen housing is unavailable.

Navy shortwave transmitter locations are at Key West, FL; Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico; Sigonella, Sicily; Guam (Barrigada); Diego Garcia; Keflavik, Iceland; and Pearl Harbor, HI. AFRTS shortwave radio transmissions have historically existed to provide AFRTS radio service to U.S. Navy vessels and outlying military posts receiving limited American radio or television through other means. The signals will be in existence for a limited time until a new technology, which is currently being tested, allows for reception of AFRTS via satellite.

In 1988, AFRTS discontinued its use of leased shortwave transmitters for overseas programme distribution. Since then, AFRTS affiliate stations around the world received programming from Washington mostly by satellite. On 31 July 2000 AFRTS terminated all use of the International Maritime Satellite system (INMARSAT). This meant that some ships at sea were left without any means of receiving AFRTS except on high frequencies.

National Public Radio [NPR] Worldwide, which transmits NPR programs to overseas audiences via FM radio rebroadcast, cable and satellite, further extended its global reach and visibility with new, shortwave transmissions and an international ad campaign. The shortwave broadcasts bring NPR Worldwide to listeners who cannot access NPR programs via FM rebroadcasts, cable or satellite, such as yachtsmen on the open sea, pilots, and outdoor adventurers in remote areas. Listeners with single side band shortwave receivers can pick up NPR Worldwide via the Armed Forces Radio and Television Service's global broadcasts.



NEWSLETTER
Join the GlobalSecurity.org mailing list