Military


DDG 52 Barry

The Barry is the second ship in the Arleigh Burke class. The fourth Barry (DDG 52) was launched on 10 May 1991 by Ingalls Shipbuilding Inc. and was commissioned into the U.S. Atlantic Fleet on 12 December 1992, being placed under the command of Commander Gary Roughead. The Commissioning ceremony took place at Naval Station Pascagoula in Mississippi. On 21 October 1993, Captain Gary Roughead, Barry's first commanding officer was relieved by Commander James G. Stavridis.

In November 1993, Barry received orders to proceed to Haiti to take part in Operation Support Democracy. On 20 May 1994, Barry departed Norfolk, Virginia on her first Mediterranean deployment. During Barry's maiden deployment, she served alongside the USS George Washington as the backdrop for the 50th anniversary of D-Day. Barry also sailed the Mediterranean and Adriatic Seas as "Red Crown" in support of the No-Fly Zone over Bosnia-Herzegovina.

On 7 October 1994, Barry received orders to proceed to the Persian Gulf in response to Iraq's massing of troops on the Kuwaiti border. In what would become known as Operation Vigilant Warrior, Barry's participation included escort of both the George Washington and an amphibious assault group to anchorage off Kuwait City. Barry also served as alternate Persian Gulf Anti-Air Warfare Coordinator (AAWC), and principal Tomahawk strike platform during the crisis. Barry received a Meritorious Unit Commendation, the Southwest Asia Service Medal, the Armed Forces Service Medal, and the NATO Medal for her actions during the deployment and returned home to Norfolk, Virginia on 17 November 1994. She deployed to the Arabian Gulf to serve in the Middle East Force in November 1997.

In October of 2004, Barry departed for the Persian Gulf in support of Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom as part of the USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Carrier Strike Group. This deployment was part of Summer Pulse 2004, the simultaneous deployment of seven aircraft carrier strike groups (CSGs) which demonstrated the ability of the Navy to provide credible combat power across the globe within five theaters and with other U.S., allied, and coalition military forces. Summer Pulse was the Navy's first deployment under its new Fleet Response Plan (FRP). During this deployment, Barry also participated in Somalia Operations in the Horn of Africa (HOA). Barry returned from this deployment in March of 2005.

In May of 2006, Barry deployed to West Africa and the Mediterranean Sea as an independently steaming unit. She participated in a port visit in Nigeria, as well as Joint Task Force Lebanon. Barry returned from this cruise in November of 2006.

During April and May of 2008, Barry participated in Exercise Joint Warrior 08-01 in the North Atlantic. This was a multi-lateral NATO exercise involving ships from over eight countries. Barry departed for a Mediterranean Sea/Persian Gulf deployment as part of Standing NATO Maritime Group Two (SNMG2) in August of 2008.

Barry has received many awards, including the Battenberg Cup for the years 1994, 1996, and 1998, earning her the nickname "Battenberg Barry" in the late 1990s. She has also been awarded the Battle E award 4 times, and received the Golden Anchor and Silver Anchor Awards for retention. More recently, in 2004 the Barry received the Arleigh Burke Fleet Trophy for being the most improved ship in the Atlantic Fleet.

John Barry

Born in County Wexford, Ireland, in 1745, John Barry was appointed a Captain in the Continental Navy 7 December 1775. He commanded Lexington and Alliance. He was seriously wounded 29 May 1781 while in command of Alliance during her capture of HMS Atalanta and Trepassy. Appointed senior captain upon the establishment of the U.S. Navy, he commanded the frigate United States in the Quasi-War with France. Commodore Barry died at Strawberry Hill, near Philadelphia, 13 September 1803 and was buried in St. Mary's Cemetery, Philadelphia.

Few Americans are well-acquainted with the gallantry and heroic exploits of Philadelphia's Irish-born naval commander, Commodore John Barry. Obscured by his contemporary, naval commander John Paul Jones, Barry remains to this day an unsung hero of the young American Republic. As most naval historians note, Barry can be classed on a par with Jones for nautical skill and daring, but he exceeds him in the length of service (17 years) to his adopted country and his fidelity to the nurturing of a permanent American Navy. Indeed, Barry deserves the proud epithet, "Father of the American Navy," a title bestowed on him not by current generations of admirers, but by his contemporaries, who were in the best position to judge.

In the space of 58 years, this son of a poor Irish farmer rose from humble cabin boy to senior commander of the entire United States fleet. Intrepid In battle, he was humane to his men as well as adversaries and prisoners. Barry's war contributions are unparalleled: he was the first to capture a British war vessel on the high seas; he captured two British ships after being severely wounded in a ferocious sea battle; he quelled three mutinies; he fought on land at the Battles of Trenton and Princeton; he captured over 20 ships including an armed British schooner in the lower Delaware; he authored a Signal Book which established a set of signals used for effective communication between ships; and he fought the last naval battle of the American Revolution aboard the frigate Alliance in 1783.

Barry's contributions to the nascent navy were singular. He authored a Signal Book in 1780, which established a set of signals to be used for effective communication between ships voyaging in squadron formation. Barry also suggested the creation of a Department of the Navy with separate cabinet status from the Secretary of War. This was finally realized with the formation of the United States Department of the Navy in 1798. Barry's suggestions about establishing government-operated navy yards were also realized. So many of the heroes of the War of 1812 were trained under Barry's tutelage that he earned the sobriquet, "Father of the Navy."

The esteem in which Barry was held by his contemporaries can best be summarized by the words of his close friend and eulogist, Signer of the Declaration, Doctor Benjamin Rush, who wrote: He fought often and once bled in the cause of freedom, but his habits of War did not lessen in him the peaceful virtues which adorn private life."

In placing Barry at the head of the Navy, George Washington stated he had special trust and confidence "in [Commodore Barry's] patriotism, valor, fidelity and abilities." Neither Washington, Barry's old friend, nor the Nation ever had reason to regret the selection of Barry as head of the Navy. Barry played a vital role in establishing the earliest traditions of the Navy: faithful devotion to duty, honoring the flag, and vigilant protection of the rights of the sovereign United States.

Barry's last day of active duty came on March 6, 1801, when he brought the USS United States into port. He remained head of the Navy until his death on September 12, 1803, from the complications of asthma. On September 14, 1803, John Barry received his country's salute in a full military burial in Philadelphia's Old St. Mary's Churchyard. Such was the man, John Barry, a gallant mariner who served his Nation well and stood tall in the annals of American naval history.




NEWSLETTER
Join the GlobalSecurity.org mailing list