Find a Security Clearance Job!

Intelligence


Abu Ghurayb Prison Prisoner Abuse

Abu Ghurayb Abuse Chronology

  • 22 March 2006 - Sgt. Michael Smith was sentenced to 179 days in prison, a fine of $2,250, a demotion to private, and a bad conduct discharge from the Army for using his un-muzzled military work dog to intimidate detainees at Abu Ghraib prison.

  • 21 March 2006 - Sgt. Michael Smith was found guilty of two counts of prisoner maltreatment, one count of simple assault , one count of conspiracy to maltreat, one count of dereliction of duty and a final charge of an indecent act. These charges were related to Smith using his un-muzzled military work dog to intimidate detainees at Abu Ghraib prison.

  • 22 November 2005 - The Army released 3,500 pages of documents regarding detainee operations. Included in the pages were records of a trial of a soldier who was convicted of voluntary manslaughter of an Iraqi detainee, and a trail of a soldier who was convicted of conspiracy, commission of and failure to prevent acts of maltreatment, cruelty, assault and indecent acts with detainees. The release of these documents were pursuant to a Freedom of Information Act litigation with the American Civil Liberties Union.

  • 4 October 2005 - The Army released over 6,600 pages of documents regarding detainee operations. Included in these documents were the records of trial of Spec. Roman Krol. The release of these documents were pursuant to a Freedom of Information Act litigation with the American Civil Liberties Union.

  • 26 September 2005 - Pfc. Lynndie England was found guilty on four counts of maltreatment of detainees, one count of committing an indecent act and one count of conspiracy. She was acquitted on a second count of conspiracy. She was sentenced to three years in prison, reduction in rank to private, and a dishonorable discharge.

  • 26 September 2005 - 1000 detainees at Abu Ghraib were released after the Iraqi government asked the Multi-National Forces to set up a special release board.

  • 20 September 2005 - The Army released over 2,700 pages of documents regarding detainee operations. Included in the pages are reports of investigation from 2004 and 2005 from the U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Command. The release of these documents were pursuant to a Freedom of Information Act litigation with the American Civil Liberties Union.

  • 9 July 2005 - The Multi-National Forces released guidelines and rules for visitation of detainees at Abu Ghraib and Camp Bucca.

  • 19 May 2005 - Spc. Sabrina Harman was found guilty on charges of conspiracy, dereliction of duty and maltreatment of subordinates. She was sentenced to six months in prison, reduction in rank to private, forfeit all pay and allowances, and will receive a bad conduct discharge.

  • 13 May 2005 - Col. Thomas M. Pappas, commander of the 205th Military Intelligence Brigade, was relieved of his command after being administratively punished for two instances of dereliction of duty at Abu Ghraib Prison.

  • 5 May 2005 - The Army released findings in detainee abuse investigations of five senior officers. The officers were: Lt. Gen. Ricardo S. Sanchez, Maj. Gen. Walter Wojdakowski, Maj. Gen. Barbara G. Fast, Brig. Gen. Janis Karpinski, and Col. Marc Warren.

  • 4 May 2005 - The judge presiding over the trial of Pfc. Lynndie England threw out her guilty plea agreement which resulted in the declaration of a mistrial. The judge dismissed the guilty plea agreement after he threw out the charge of conspiracy due to testimony by Private Charles Graner which contradicted England's guilty plea.

  • 8 April 2005 - BG Karpinksi was formally relieved of her command of the 800th MP Brigade. Based on the Department of the Army Inspector General investigation, BG Karpinksi was also received a reduction in rank to colonel and a memorandum of reprimand.

  • 7 April 2005 - The Army released 5 trial records of individuals accused of detainee abuse, summaries of courts-martial documents, testimony before the Senate Armed Services Committee pertaining to detainee abuse, information papers pertaining to detainee operations, unit training packages, operating procedures, and other materials pertaining to the treatment, handling of detainees, and unit guidelines for the interrogation of prisoners. All of the cases cited in this release have been adjudicated, resulting in reductions in rank, forfeiture of pay, confinement, and other adverse administrative action. The release of these documents were pursuant to a Freedom of Information Act litigation with the American Civil Liberties Union.

  • 30 March 2005 - The Army released 1 report of investigation (maltreatment), 6 military police records of previously released cases, 6 criminal investigation division policy documents, and 8 executive summaries of previously released cases. The release of these documents were pursuant to a Freedom of Information Act litigation with the American Civil Liberties Union.

  • 25 March 2005 - The Army released 1235 pages of documents concerning detainee operations pursuant to a Freedom of Information Act litigation with the American Civil Liberties Union.

  • 3 March 2005 - The Army released 1,199 pages of criminal investigations pursuant to a Freedom of Information Act litigation with the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU). The facts included in the documents were 1 undetermined manner of death, 3 justifiable homicides, 1 alleged rape, 1 alleged larceny, 7 alleged assaults or cruelty and maltreatment. The allegations and circumstances in each of these 13 cases were investigated and the cases were closed. The investigations failed to support any criminal charges.

  • 1 March 2005 - The Defense Department disputes ACLU and Human Rights First Lawsuit that the Defense Department approved of, sanctioned, or condoned as a matter of policy detainee abuse.

  • 24 February 2005 - The United States Army announced that they have implemented new detainee procedures to ensure that detainees are not abused, like those at Abu Ghraib.

  • 18 February 2005 - The Army, concerning detainee operations, released 988 pages of criminal investigations pursuant to a Freedom of Information Act litigation with the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU).

  • 4 February 2005 - Sgt. Javal Davis pled guilty to dereliction of duty, making false official statements and battery. He was sentenced to six months in prison, a reduction in rank to private, and a bad conduct discharge.

  • 1 February 2005 - Spc. Roman Krol pled guilty to conspiracy and maltreatment of detainees at Abu Ghraib. He was sentenced to ten months confinement, reduction in rank to private, and a bad conduct discharge.

  • 15 January 2005 - Spc. Charles Graner was found guilty of nine of the ten counts against him. He was sentenced to ten years in prison, along with being reduced in rank to private and dishonorably discharged from the army.

  • 7 January 2005 - The trial of Spc. Charles Graner began at Fort Hood, Texas. He is charged with physically and sexually abusing prisoners at Abu Ghraib.

  • 11 November 2004 - The General Court-Martial Convening Authority elected to relocate the trials of United States vs. Sgt. Javal Davis, United States vs. Spc. Charles Graner, and United States vs. Spc. Sabrina Harman to Fort Hood, Texas. These three cases involve allegations of detainee abuse at the Baghdad Central Confinement Facility located in Abu Ghraib, Iraq.

  • 21 October 2004 - Staff Sgt. Fredrick, after sentencing evidence was presented by both government and defense attorneys, the military judge sentenced Staff Sgt. Fredrick to be reduced to a private, forfeit of all pay and allowances, to be dishonorably discharged and to be confined for 10 years. As a result of the pre-trial agreement Staff Sgt. Fredrick's confinement will be reduced to eight years.

  • 20 October 2004 - Staff Sgt. Ivan L. Fredrick II pled guilty to and was found guilty of one specification of conspiracy to maltreat detainees, one specification of dereliction of duty for failure to protect detainees from maltreatment, four specifications of maltreatment of detainees, one specification of assaulting a detainee and one specification of committing an indecent act.

  • 11 September 2004 - Specialist Armin J. Cruz plead guilty to and was found guilty of Article 81 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice, conspiracy to maltreat detainees in Abu Ghraib and Article 93, maltreatment of detainees. He has been sentenced to reduction to Private (E-1), confinement for eight months, and a Bad Conduct Discharge.

  • 25 August 2004 - Article 39a hearings begin for Specialists Megan Ambuhl, Charles Graner, Sgt. Ivan Frederick, and Sgt. Javal Davis. Judge Pohl gave the U.S. Government until Sept. 10 to provide the defense with the requested reports and documents, which included the Fay/Jones and Church reports. Specialist Ambuhl had three additional charges dismissed without prejudice: one count of conspiracy and two counts of maltreatment of detainees. The prosecution may have these charges reinvestigated and added back into the original charges.

  • 24 August 2004 - The members of the Independent Panel to Review DoD Detention Operations briefed Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld as they delivered their final report. The four members of the panel included Former Secretary Of Defense Harold Brown; Former U.S. Representative Tillie Fowler (R-Fl); General Charles A. Horner, USAF (Retired); Former Secretary Of Defense James R. Schlesinger.

  • 11 August 2004 - Specialist Megan Ambuhl was arraigned on charges related to prisoner abuse at the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq. Charges against Specialist Ambuhl include Maltreatment of Subordinates, Dereliction of Duties, and Committing Indecent Acts with Detainees. At Ambuhl's arraignment, her attorney deferred entering a plea or forum choice, which is choosing to be tried by a jury or solely by a judge or panel of judges.

  • 10 August 2004 - Pre-trial hearing are scheduled to begin for the four cases against Corporal Charles Grainer, Specialist Megan Ambuhl, Staff Sgt. Ivan Frederick, and Specialist Javal Davis in Mannheim Germany on August 23-24. All future proceedings are expected to be held in Baghdad.

  • 24 June 2004 - SPC Harman receives an Article 32 hearing to determine if their are enough facts to warrant a court martial.

  • 24 June 2004 - The U.S. Defense Department released hundreds of pages of memos in order to reject criticism the Bush administration allowed the use of highly questionable interrogation techniques on prisoners held in the war on terror. The documents include a directive from Bush arguing that American values demand that detainees be treated humanely.

  • 22 June 2004 - US CENTCOM confirmed the death on June 10 of a 52-year-old male detained by coalition forces. Autopsies showed the cause of death as due to a heart attack during treatment for heart-related problems.

  • 21 June 2004 - Two pre-trial hearings were held in the cases of U.S. vs. Davis and U.S. vs. Graner.

  • 10 June 2004 - The Department of Defense announced that the secretary of defense issued new guidance on procedures for investigations into deaths of any person held as a detainee in the custody of the U.S. Armed Forces.

  • 10 June 2004 - The New York Times writes that during this week CENTCOM Commander Gen. John Abizaid requested that an officer more senior than current Investigating Officer MG George Fay lead the military's investigation into the prison abuse scandal. A higher-ranking officer would be able to interview senior officers which Army regulations prevent MG Fay from doing.

  • 9 June 2004 - The Washington Post alleges that Rumsfeld instructed interrogators to "take the gloves off" in their search for information from American Taliban recruit John Walker Lindh. This article implies that questionable interrogation techniques may have been employed by US soldiers since September 11, 2001.

  • 3 June 2004 - The International Committee of the Red Cross said that it had repeatedly warned the US to take "corrective action" over alleged prisoner abuses at the Abu Ghraib jail in Iraq.

  • 24 May 2004 - 24 detainees are released from Abu Ghraib prison.

  • 23 May 2004 - Brig. Gen. Janis L. Karpinski is suspended from her command of the 800th Military Police Brigade.

  • 21 May 2004 - 454 detainees are released from the Abu Ghraib prison

  • 19 May 2004 - In the first court-martial related to the prison abuse scandal, Spc. Jeremy Sivits receives the maximum penalty; one year in prison, reduction in rank and a bad conduct discharge.

  • 18 May 2004 - Spc. Charles Graner, Staff Sgt. Ivan L. Frederick II and Sgt. Javal S. Davis are arraigned on charges of abusing detainees at Abu Ghraib.

  • 15 May 2004 - The New Yorker's Seymour Hersch alleges that Rumsfeld authorized the use of questionable interrogation tactics to facilitate the accumulation of actionable intelligence through the use of a Special Access Program.

  • 14 May 2004 - The US Military announces that Spc. Charles Graner will be court-martialed in connection with the abuse of detainees.

  • 13 May 2004 - DoD Secretary Rumsfeld visits Abu Ghraib prison.

  • 11 May 2004 - MG Taguba testifies before Congress, detailing the findings of his report.

  • 11 May 2004 - Defense Secretary Rumsfeld tells Senate Appropriations Defense subcommittee that authorized methods had been confirmed by Pentagon lawyers as complying with the Geneva Conventions on treatment of detainees.

  • 7 May 2004 - Rumsfeld testifies before Congress.

  • 7 May 2004 - The Wall Street Journal publishes the report by the International Committee of the Red Cross detailing widespread incidents of abuse.

  • 5 May 2004 - President Bush pledges on Arab television that the soldiers responsible will be punished.

  • 3 May 2004 - The US military reprimands the six MP officers.

  • 1 May 2004 - CJTF-7 approves MG Taguba recommendations.

  • 1 May 2004 - President Bush declares an end to major combat operations in Iraq.

  • 1 May 2004 - A New Yorker article includes portions of the Taguba Report's investigation of abuses at Abu Ghraib.

  • 28 April 2004 - "60 Minutes II" broadcasts photos of abuses at Abu Ghraib, taken in late 2003.

  • 28 April 2004 - Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld briefs Congress on the Taguba Report.

  • 28 April 2004 - BG Kimmitt updates public on status of investigation.

  • 15 April 2004 - MG Fay MI investigation initiated.

  • Mid April 2004 - General Richard Myers asks CBS to delay airing its photographs of Iraqi prisoner abuse, which CBS does for two weeks.

  • 6 April 2004 - CG CFLCC approves MG Taguba investigation.

  • 20 March 2004 - Charges are lodged against the six accused MP NCOs. BG Kimmit gives a press conference.

  • 15 March 2004 - The 530th MP Battalion, 800th MP Brigade ceased command of detainee operations and FOB Operations at the MEK holding facility.

  • 3 March 2004 - The Taguba team presented their out-brief to the appointing authority, LTG McKiernan.

  • 26 February 2004 - The 310th MP Battalion, 800th MP Brigade was tasked with detainee operations and Forward Operating Base (FOB) Operations at the Camp Bucca Detention Facility until TOA.

  • 24 February 2004 - The International Committee on the Red Cross provides the Coalition Authority with a confidential report on prison abuse in Iraq.

  • 23 February 2004 - Seventeen US soldiers are suspended pending outcome of the investigation.

  • 17 February 2004 - The Taguba team returned to Camp Bucca, Iraq to complete interviews of witnesses at that location.

  • 14 and 15 February 2004 - The Taguba team interviewed a number of witnesses from the 800th MP Brigade.

  • 10 February 2004 - LTG Mikolashek begins Department of the Army Inspector General (DAIG) assessment.

  • 8 February to 28 February 2004 - The Taguba team collected documents, compiled references, conducted follow-up interviews, and completed a detailed analysis of the volumes of materials accumulated throughout their investigation.

  • 8 February 2004 - The Taguba team moves to Baghdad.

  • 6 and 7 February 2004 - At Camp Doha, Kuwait, MG Taguba and his team conducted extensive training sessions on approved detention practices.

  • 7 February 2004 - The team visited the Camp Bucca Detention Facility to familiarize itself with the facility and operating structure.

  • 2 February 2004 - MG Antonio M. Taguba took his team to Baghdad for a one-day inspection of the Abu Ghraib Prison (BCCF) and the High Value Detainee (HVD) Complex in order to become familiar with those facilities.

  • 31 January 2004 - Commander of CFLCC, LTG McKiernan appointed MG Antonio M. Taguba, Deputy Commanding General Support, CFLCC, to conduct an informal investigation under AR 15-6 into the 800th MP Brigade's detention and internment operations.

  • 28 January 2004 - CID Report on criminal abuses at Abu Ghraib.

  • 24 January 2004 - Chief of Staff of US Central Command (CENTCOM), MG R. Steven Whitcomb, on behalf of the CENTCOM Commander, directed that the Commander, CFLCC, LTG David D. McKiernan, conduct an investigation into the 800th MP Brigade's detention and internment operations from 1 November 2003 to present surrounding recent reports of suspected detainee abuse in Iraq.

  • 19 January 2004 - LTG Sanchez requested that the Commander, US Central Command, appoint an Investigating Officer to investigate the conduct of operations within the 800th Military Police Brigade from 1 November 2003 to the present. This report is separate from the other investigation which is an investigation into the specifically alleged crimes.

  • 17 January 2004 - Phillabaum was suspended from his duties as commander of the 320th MP Battalion by LTG Sanchez, CJTF-7 Commander.

  • 17 January 2004 - BG Janis Karpinski, Commander, 800th MP Brigade receives a Memorandum of Admonishment by LTG Sanchez, Commander, CJTF-7.

  • 17 January 2004 - CPT Donald Reese ceased command of the 372nd MP Company.

  • 16 January 2004 - BG Kimmit notifies reporters that an investigation had been opened into alleged abuse at an unspecified prison in Iraq.

  • 14 to 25 January 2004 - The Criminal Investigation Division (CID) conducts interviews.

  • 13 January 2004 - Abu Ghraib detainee abuse reported by Army Spc. Joseph M. Darby, an MP with the 800 MP Brigade.

  • 24 December 2003 - BG Karpinski sends a letter to the International Committee on the Red Cross, arguing that the isolation of specific detainees was a military necessity.

  • 13 December 2003 - Saddam Hussein is captured alive outside of Tikrit.

  • 24 November 2003 - AR 15-6 Investigation on Riot and Shootings. Riot and shootings of 12 detainees (three died) at Camp Ganci, at Abu Ghraib. Nine MPs of the 320th MP Battalion are wounded.

  • 19 November 2003 - CJTF-7 Fragmentary Order 1108 gave the commander of the 205th MI brigade, Col. Thomas M. Pappas, control of Forward Operating Base Abu Ghraib until Transfer of Authority on 6 February 2004.

  • 10 November 2003 - TC Jerry Phillabaum, Commander, 320th MP Battalion is given a General Officer Memorandum of Reprimand from BG Karpinski, Commander 800th MP Brigade, for lack of leadership.

  • 6 November 2003 - MG Ryder's Report is submitted.

  • 15 October 2003 - 372nd MP Company of the 320th MP Battalion takes over Tiers 1A and 1B at Abu Ghraib.

  • October to December 2003 - Numerous photographed incidents of "sadistic, blatant, and wanton criminal abuses" were inflicted on several detainees at Abu Ghraib Confinement Facility.

  • 31 August to 9 September 2003 - MG Miller led a team of personnel experienced in strategic interrogation to HQ, CJTF-7 and the Iraqi Survey Group (ISG) to review current Iraqi Theater ability to rapidly exploit internees for actionable intelligence.

  • 11 August 2003 - CJTF-7 requests assessment team; MG Ryder is appointed.

  • 4 August 2003 - Abu Ghraib Prison is reopened by coalition forces. It is renamed Baghdad Central Detention Center.

  • 1 July 2003 - Amnesty International criticizes the U.S. military for subjecting Iraqi detainees to degrading conditions.

  • 30 June of 2003 to 23 May 2004 - BG Janis L. Karpinski served as the Commander of the 800th MP Brigade.

  • 9 June 2004 - Riot and shootings of five detainees at Camp Cropper by 115th MP Battalion.

  • 8 June 2003 - CID Report on abuse of detainees at Camp Bucca.

  • 12 May 2003 - Four soldiers from the 320th MP Battalion abused detainees at the Theater Internment Facility (TIF) at Camp Bucca, Iraq following a transport mission from Talil Air Base.

  • 22 April 2003 - US forces take over Abu Ghraib.

  • 16 April 2003 - A memo by Secretary Rumsfeld to General James Hill outlined 24 permitted interrogation techniques, four of which require Rumsfeld's imprimatur.

  • 19 March 2003 - The Iraqi War begins with a "decapitation attack" aimed at the leadership of Saddam Hussein's government.

  • 6 March 2003 - Lawyers from the White House and the Departments of Justice and Defense draft recommendations on detainee interrogations, echoing previous memos which state that the President is exempt from laws prohibiting torture.

  • March 2003 - The Washington Post alleges that a team of Bush administration lawyers concluded in a March 2003 legal memorandum that President Bush was not bound by either an international treaty prohibiting torture or by a federal anti torture law because he had the authority as commander in chief to approve any technique needed to protect the nation's security.

  • February 2003 to 17 January 2004 - LTC Jerry Phillabaum served as the Battalion Commander of the 320th MP Battalion.

  • December 2002 to 7 January 2004 - CPT Donald Reese served as the Company Commander of the 372nd MP Company, which was in charge of guarding detainees at FOB Abu Ghraib.

  • August 2002 - The Washington Post alleges that in an August 2002 memo, the Justice Department advised the White House that torturing al Qaeda terrorists in captivity abroad "may be justified," and that international laws against torture "may be unconstitutional if applied to interrogations" conducted as part of the Global War on Terrorism.

  • 1 August 2002 - US Department of Justice lawyers tell the CIA that only severe physical injury and/or long-term psychological trauma constitute trauma.

  • 25 January 2002 - White House legal counsel Alberto Gonzales sends a memo to President Bush, advising him to declare the Taliban and Al Qaeda outside of the Geneva conventions.

  • 9 January 2002 - US Department of Justice lawyers send a memo to the Pentagon arguing that the Geneva conventions do not apply to the war in Afghanistan, nor to captured members of Al-Qaeda or the Taliban.




NEWSLETTER
Join the GlobalSecurity.org mailing list