Public Eye


World Trade Center - New York City
9-11 Terrorist Attacks


The World Trade Center
Manhattan, New York (World Trade Center - Aftermath Image-#2), Sept. 15, 2001
This one-meter resolution satellite image of Manhattan, New York was collected at 11:54 a.m. EDT on Sept. 15, 2001 by Space Imaging's IKONOS satellite. The image shows the remains of the 1,350-foot towers of the World Trade Center, and the debris and dust that has settled throughout the area. Also visible are the many emergency and rescue vehicles in the streets in the vicinity of the disaster. IKONOS is the world's first high-resolution commercial Earth imaging satellite. It travels 423 miles above the Earth's surface at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour. Mandatory photo credit: "GeoEye"

Manhattan, New York (World Trade Center - Aftermath Image), Sept. 12, 2001

This one-meter resolution satellite image of Manhattan, New York was collected at 11:43 a.m. EDT on Sept. 12, 2001 by Space Imaging's IKONOS satellite. The image shows an area of white dust and smoke at the location where the 1,350-foot towers of the World Trade Center once stood. IKONOS travels 423 miles above the Earth's surface at a speed of 17,500 miles per hour.

Mandatory photo credit: "GeoEye"

SPOT Satellite Images of World Trade Center Fires
SPOT satellite image of Manhattan, acquired on September 11 at 11:55 AM EST, 3 hours after two planes crashed into the World Trade Center. The colors result from the use of infrared bands to identify the actual fire hot spots (see red spots near the base of the smoke plume). The SPOT satellites orbit at an altitude of 822 km. [This copyrighted image may be used free of charge, with the appropriate copyright attribution, as follows: (c) CNES/SPOT Image 2001)
Images from NASA's Terra Satellite show the fire plume from Manhattan after the terrorist attack on the World Trade Center. These images were put together from Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. They were taken from an altitude between 620 and 876 nautical miles above the Earth's surface.


NASA's Terra Satellite
True-Color Image, taken Sept. 12, 2001 by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument aboard NASA's Terra Satellite. Credit: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.
International Space Station Imagery
September 11, 2001 --- This still image, taken from video sent from the International Space Station on Tuesday, shows a smoke plume rising from the Manhattan area of New York City.














International Space Station Imagery
(11 September 2001) --- One of a series of pictures taken of metropolitan New York City (and other parts of New York as well as New Jersey) by one of the Expedition Three crew members onboard the International Space Station (ISS) at various times during the day of September 11, 2001. The image shows a smoke plume rising from the Manhattan area. The orbital outpost was flying at an altitude of approximately 250 miles. The image was recorded with a digital still camera.
NOAA Digital Surface Models created by the LIDAR system
September 28, 2001 --- Digital Surface Models created by the LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) system provide very accurate 3-dimensional positioning of the building structures and the surrounding area. The 3-D models, in this case, have helped to locate original support structures, stairwells, elevator shafts, basements, etc. When this data is merged with the high resolution aerial photography taken by NOAA's Citation aircraft, it will create a very accurate image with relative accuracy around three decimeters. Credit: NOAA



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