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JCSAT

In 1985 the Japanese Communications Satellite Company was created by Hughes, Mitsui, and C Itoh as a commercial alternative to the Government controlled CS and BS satellites for the full range of telecommunications services (Hughes later left the consortium). In March, 1989, and January, 1990, JCSAT 1 and JCSAT 2 were launched by Ariane and Titan 3 boosters, respectively. Both spacecraft are identical and based on the Hughes HS-393 platform. These 1.4-metric-ton spin-stabilized spacecraft are 3.7 m in diameter and 10 m tall when the solar array skirt is extended. The communications payload consists of 40 14/12 GHz transponders (including eight spares), working through a single 2.4 m diameter antenna. The JCSAT spacecraft are deployed at 150 degrees E (next to ETS V) and 154 degrees E and were designed to operate for at least ten years.

The first Japanese Commercial Communications satellite was launched into geotransfer orbit by an Ariane 44 LP booster 1989-03-06. Privately owned and operated by JCSAT, a joint venture between Hughes Space and Communications Groupd, C. Itoh & Co. Ltd, and Mitsui & Co, Ltd, it provided Japanese businesses with telephone, TV, facsimile and data services. High quality video and message data was received on user antennas as small as 1.2 m. The first of the new Hughes HS 393 series, JCSAT measured 3.7 m by 10 m fully extended and with it 2.3 m antenna deployed. Body mounted solar cells provided 2,200 W; two nickel hydrogen batteries powered it in shadow. The Ku-band communications payload provided 32 channels, each able to handle one TV broadcast or 250 telephone circuits. JCSAT separated from the Ariane third stage 20 minutes after launch. The first of four apogee motor firings commenced 26.5 hrs later, boosting the satellite towards it orbital slot at 150 deg. e.

JCSAT 2, a Japanese communications satellite, was launched 1990-01-01 by the US using the Titan 3 launch vehicle along with the UK's Skynet 4A satellite. It was the second in a two-satellite series of privately owned high-power Japanese communications satellites. A solid-fuel kick motor boosted the satellite into a geosynchronous transfer orbit. After 4 weeks of tests, the satellite was delivered to its owner/operator, Japan Communications Satellite Company (JCSAT) in February 1990. JCSAT is jointly owned by Hughes Communications, Inc, C. Itoh & Co, and Mitsui and Co, Ltd. The satellite provided telephone, TV, facsimile and data services to Japanese businesses. High quality video and message data were received on user antennas as small as 1.2 m. The Ku-band communications payload provided 32 channels, each able to handle one TV broadcast, 250 telephone circuits or 45 million bits of data per second. It measured 3.7 m by 10 m fully extended and with its 2.3 m antenna deployed. Body mounted solar cells provided 2200 W of power over its 10-yeart design life. Stationed above 154 deg e, it joined JCSAT 1, launched in March 1989.

JCSAT 3 was a 1841 kg Japanese communications spacecraft. It was launched 1995-08-29 by an Atlas 2AS from Cape Canaveral, United States. It carried twelve C-band transponders operating at 36 MHz, twelve Ku-band transponders operating at 36 MHz and sixteen Ku-band transponders operating at 27 MHz. It provided 50 channels of digital television from its highly eccentric orbit.

The Japanese Communications Satellite 4 (JCSAT 4) was launched 1997-02-18 on an Atlas 2AS to relay voice, data and television signals to Japan, with multiple beams for international coverage west to India, south to Australia and New Zealand, and east to Hawaii. JCSAT-4 carried four octagonal communications antennas and two wings with four solar panels each. The payload consisted of 12 active C-band transponders and 28 active Ku-band transponders with an expected lifetime of at least 12 years. It was launched as a replacement for JCSAT 1 after a small fuel leak rendered it inoperable.

The Japanese Communications Satellite 5 (JCSat 5) was launched 1997-12-02 by an Ariane 44P to relay voice, data and television signals to Japan, with multiple beams for international coverage west to India, south to Australia and New Zealand, and east to Hawaii. JCSat-5 carried four octagonal communications antennas and two wings with four solar panels each. The payload consisted of 12 active C-band transponders and 28 active Ku-band transponders with an expected lifetime of at least 12 years. It was placed in a geosynchronous orbit at 139.4 deg E initially, but was planned to be operated over 150 deg E.

JCSAT 6 was a Japanese geosynchronous communications spacecraft was launched 1999-02-16 on an Atlas 2AS that provided voice and video communications to East Asia and Japan through its 31 Ku-band transponders after parking over 124 degrees East longitude.

JCSat-7 is Japan Satellite System's portion of N-SAT-110. Superbird D is the Space Communication Corp. portion of N-SAT-110. As of September 1997, Superbird 5 and JCSat-7 were requesting approval for the same orbital slot at 110 degrees East longitude. This is the only slot available in 2000. The Ministry of Posts and Telecommunications ordered, in April 1998, Space Communications Corp. (SCC) and Japan Satellite Systems (JSat) to share a satellite at 110 degrees East longitude.

JCSAT 8 is a Japanese geosynchronous communications spacecraft that was launched by an Ariane 44L rocket from Kourou at 01:29 UT on 29 March 2002. The 2.5 tonne satellite will provide direct-to-home TV broadcast to Japan, East Asia, Australia and Hawaii after parking over 154 deg-E longitude.

JCSAT 8 is a Japanese geosynchronous communications spacecraft that was launched by an Ariane 44L rocket from Kourou at 01:29 UT on 29 March 2002. The 2.5 tonne satellite will provide direct-to-home TV broadcast to Japan, East Asia, Australia and Hawaii after parking over 154 deg-E longitude.

JCSAT 9 is a Japanese geostationary communications satellite that was launched by a Zenit 3SL rocket from the floating Odyssey platform over the equatorial Pacific Ocean at 154 deg-W longitude at 23:30 UT on 12 April 2006. The 4.4 tonne satellite will provide voice, video and internet services through out Asia, through its 20 C-band and 20 Ku-band transponders after parking over 132-E longitude.

JCSat 10 is a Japanese geostationary communications satellite that was launched by an Ariane 5 rocket from Kourou at 22:14 UT on 11 August 2006. The 4.4 tonne satellite carries 30 Ku-band and 12 C-band transponders to provide direct-to-home radio and television services to Japan, Asia-Pacific, and Hawaii, after parking over 128° E longitude.

JCSat-11 was destroyed in the September 5, 2007 Proton M launch failure. The Proton second stage shut down 139 seconds into the flight at a altitude of about 76-kilometers. JCSat-11 was to have been an on-orbit spare. The satellite and launch were insured for about $185 million. Satellite replacement cost is $200 million. Launch cost is $75 million. JCSat-11 was based on the Lockheed Martin A2100 AX basic model. It had 12 C-band and 40 Ku-band transponders. JCSat-12 was the replacement satellite.

JCSAT 12, a communications satellite for Japan, was launched on an Ariane 5 rocket from Kourou on 21 August 2009 at 22:09 UT. The 4,000 kg satellite carries 30 Ku-band and 12 C-band transponders serving Japan, the Asia-Pacific region, and Hawaii. The satellite will serve as a backup and will be renamed JCSAT R-A once it is operational. It has an expected life span of 15 years.

JCSAT 13, a Japanese communications satellite, was launched from Kourou on 15 May 2012 at 22:13 UT. The satellite was launched by an Ariane 5 ECA rocket and weighed 4.53 tonnes. It carries 44 Ku-band transponders and will provide service to Japan and Southeast Asia. JCSAT 13 will be positioned in geostationary orbit at 124 degrees East. It will replace JCSAT 4A and has a design life of 15 years.

SKY Perfect JSAT Corporation announced June 12, 2013 that it had entered into an agreement with satellite manufacturer Space Systems/Loral (SSL) for the construction of its new satellite JCSAT-14. This new communications satellite is scheduled to be launched during the second half of 2015. JCSAT-14 will succeed and replace JCSAT-2A in the orbital position of 154 degree East Longitude. Based on the SSL 1300 platform, the new satellite will feature larger, redesigned C-band and Ku-band payloads, boosting the available regional capacity by multiple folds. The new satellite is designed to fulfill the growing demand for telecommunication infrastructure in Asia Pacific. It offers extensive coverage over Asia, Russia, Oceania and the Pacific Islands. Broadcast and data networks can be established and upgraded with ease via the optimized C-band beams. New regional Ku-band beams are also added to extend the satellite’s geographical footprint and to address the fast-growing mobility markets, enabling high-speed connectivity for vessels, aircrafts, and the resources exploration industries such as mining, oil and gas companies, where the requirement for flexible, reliable service is greater than ever. SKY Perfect JSAT Corporation concluded a contract January 10, 2014 for a launch service for its JCSAT-14 communications satellite with Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX). JCSAT-14 will replace JCSAT-2A in geostationary orbit at 154degree East Longitude. The contract for the construction of the satellite was concluded on June 12, 2013. The launch is scheduled for the second half of 2015. ( Space Systems/Loral (SSL), a leading provider of commercial satellites, announced April 16, 2014 that it was selected to provide two communications satellites to SKY Perfect JSAT, a leading satellite operator based in Japan, with a fleet of 16 satellites. The satellites, JCSAT-15 and JCSAT-16 will be used by SKY Perfect JSAT to meet the growing demand for telecommunications infrastructure in the Asia Pacific region. The two satellites are designed to be used for services such as video distribution, data transfer communications, and back-up service capabilities in Japan and neighboring regions. They both operate in Ku-band and provide switching for flexibility. JCSAT-15 is a 10-kW satellite which will be located at 110 degrees East longitude where it replaces the N-SAT110 satellite currently on orbit. In addition to providing legacy service it will also provide expansion capability and it is designed with the flexibility to adjust its coverage of Japan and the Indian Ocean Region to serve the areas with the highest demand. JCSAT-16 is an 8.5-kW satellite which is designed to be used at a broad range of orbital locations. When launched it will ensure continuous service and it will be available as a back-up to the existing fleet. JCSAT-15 and 16 are both based on the highly reliable SSL 1300 satellite platform that provides the flexibility for a broad range of applications and technology advances. Scheduled for launch in 2016, the satellites are designed to deliver service for 15 years or longer.



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