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Space


Orbital Deep Space Imager (ODSI)

The Orbital Deep Space Imager (ODSI) effort develops a system to provide imagery of deep space objects for satellite characterization. In concert with other Space Situation Awareness network sensors, ODSI will permit improved knowledge of space activities. The ODSI program will deploy a satellite constellation for characterization of objects in deep space in support of overall battlespace awareness.

The ODSI system will be an end-to-end satellite system (spacecraft, payloads, ground system, launch integration, product dissemination, communication interfaces, and mission support) whose purpose is to enhance the Space Situational Awareness (SSA) sub-mission of the Space Control Mission Area. A Milestone Decision Authority Program (MDAP), the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) has recognized ODSI as a transformational program vital to the Department of Defense. The primary function of ODSI will be to provide imagery for space object characterization and orbital position data. It is envisioned that the ODSI system will include a constellation of 3 or more satellites. The imager will also provide object identification data on additional satellites as needed, including satellites in other deep space orbits. The ODSI system will increase the Space Object Identification (SOI) coverage and capacity of the Space Surveillance Network and support satellite catalog maintenance and space order of battle for SSA.

The ODSI would be a telescope system, but it would be a "drifter", continuously moving through the GEO belt taking pictures of objects of interest, both US andr foreign. The imager would be used to get "up close and personal information" on any foreign spacecraft, or an American satellite that might have been damaged. This system would have powerful sensors to supply detailed images of space objects to produce near-real time common operating picture of space for space-control operations.

On 27 Aug 2004, a sources sought notice was issued on FedBizOps requesting submittals of Statements of Capabilities (SOC) from interested parties for the purpose of conducting conceptual studies for the Orbital Deep Space Imager (ODSI) system. The intent of the Government was to pursue multiple awards of Pre KDP-A concept studies with the intent of: (1) studying alternative concepts, (2) identifying potential solutions, and (3) identifying technologies as part of the ODSI program. The primary function of the system will be to provide imagery for space object characterization and orbital position data. Up to three contract awards are anticipated. A solicitation was released on Sept. 22, 2004.

Respondents were required to address the following: 1. Demonstrate an understanding of the Space Control Mission, the Space Situational Awareness sub-Mission, and how ODSI integrates into these mission areas (e.g. system-of-systems, family-of-systems, horizontal integration and interoperability across mission area). 2. Discuss prior experience serving in a prime contractor role on programs of similar scope/size as ODSI (responsible for acquisition, system integration, spacecraft-to-launch vehicle integration, deployment, and initial operational support). Include corporate best practices and lessons learned that were derived from each experience, providing a brief description of the program to include program names, contract values ($M), and periods of performance. 3. Discuss any prior experience with advanced space and ground systems (acquisition, integration, deployment, data dissemination, and operational support) that is applicable to ODSI, providing a brief description of the program to include program names, contract values ($M), and periods of performance.

Respondents were required to address the following corporate core competencies related to these experiences (as applicable) and how they will help meet ODSI program objectives: a. Program Management; b. Contract/Subcontract Management; c. Systems Engineering (CAIV Analysis, Requirements Allocation); d. Space, Ground, Link, and Data Dissemination Elements; e. Payload Technologies; f. System/Component Integration & Test; g. Spacecraft/Launch Vehicle Integration; h. Deployment, Operations, and Sustainment. 4. List any prior experience that involved interfacing with military command and control organizations and integrating into existing military infrastructure (e.g. Space Control Cheyenne Mountain; 14th AF, HQ AFSPC/DOY; 21st Ops Squadron; USSPACECOM). Discuss how this experience is applicable to meeting ODSI program objectives.

Respondents were required to provide the following information in a one page security annex: a. Defense Security Service (DSS) facility clearance and safeguarding levels. b. NISP, SAP/SAR, and SCI security management experience. c. Facility space (sq ft) that is currently SCIF accredited and/or meets DCID 6/9 standards, that can be readily accredited at the SAP/SCI level to accomplish ODSI objectives during all phases of the program. d. Plan for providing adequate SCIF space to accomplish ODSI objectives during all phases of the program. Successful candidates will be authorized 4-6 personnel, one of whom must be a security representative, to be accessed to classified information. These 4-6 personnel must have a current TS/SSBI with no derogatory information that would preclude 1st Tier adjudication for special access.

Qualified offerors were determined to be those whose Statement of Capabilities satisfied requested program requirements and met the security prerequisites within the ODSI Federal Business Opportunity announcement posted 27 Aug 2004 (reference number-ODSI68). The Government anticipated the proposals to be due the first week of December 2004. Qualified offerors will receive specific instructions on how to obtain a copy of the RFP.

The goal for this solicitation was a competitive award without discussions. To achieve this, the Government has actively engaged the contractor community over the past several months to ensure industry has a thorough understanding of the requirements and objectives. The ODSI system will be an end-to-end satellite system (spacecraft, payloads, ground system, launch integration, product dissemination, communication interfaces, and mission support) whose purpose is to enhance the Space Situational Awareness (SSA) sub-mission of the Space Control Mission Area. A Milestone Decision Authority Program (MDAP), the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) has recognized ODSI as a transformational program vital to the Department of Defense.

The Boeing Company [FA8819-05-C-0002], Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company [FA8819-05-C-0004], and Northrop Grumman Space Technology [FA8819-05-C-0003] were competitively awarded ODSI Concept Study contracts in January 2005 for pre-Phase A activities. The Space and Missile Systems Center (SMC) Space Superiority Materiel Wing (SY) extended these th existing concept study efforts for the Orbital Deep Space Imager Program from pre-Phase A to system design review to allow each corporation to continue their pre-Phase A development efforts, hold a System Requirements Review in FY06 and a System Design Review in FY07. The anticipated award date was 1 August 2005 with a period of performance of 22 months. As of 2005 the Orbital Deep Space Imager contract, worth $500 million, had an anticipated RFP date of October 2007. The first ODSI launch was scheduled for FY12 as of 2004, with the first ODSI launch scheduled for FY13 as of 2005. ODSI competitively awarded three contracts for concept studies in 2005. ODSI, which received an estimated $24.2 million of the SPACETRACK budget in FY 2006, was terminated and not included in the FY 2007 budget request. Due

The Orbital Deep Space Imager (ODSI) concept derived from the 1999 Space-Based Deep Space Imager concept. The primary operational function of this earlier concept was to provide imagery on 3-axis stabilized satellites in geosynchronous orbit. Wide-band imaging radars, whose primary mission includes deep-space imaging, cannot image geostationary 3-axis stabilized satellites. A space-based Imager is needed to maintain the SOB and providing support to intelligence users and providing satellite owners/operators a way to resolve anomalies in their DS satellites.

The Orbital Deep Space Imager (ODSI) concept will employ a space-based imaging system and the associated on-board processing to downlink images to a user. These satellites will be placed in an orbit that allows for high resolution "flyby" imagery of geostationary satellites at distances of hundreds to thousands of kilometers.

Deployment of a space-based imaging system should ensure routine imagery of DS objects with complete coverage of all GEO satellites. It could be deployed in a 180 degrees inclination circular orbit near geosynchronous altitudes or in a 0 degree inclination highly elliptical orbit. Other options should be explored.

This concept will not evolve from any current systems, although it has a legacy from the Geosynchronous Imaging Experiment analytical study conducted in 1995. Resolution and revisit rate must meet Space Surveillance requirement. The key performance issue is the resolution obtainable on the DS satellites of interest considering the closest approach achievable without significant maneuvering. Many of these objects are in slightly inclined (i.e., not perfectly geosynchronous) orbits and the resolution obtainable on objects in orbits other than geosynchronous may be of lower quality.

The key deployment issues include space lift requirements, orbital transfer requirements (to ensure sufficient flexibility), number of satellites required to image to satisfy intelligence requirements, and revisit rate.

The key technology issues and choices are the size of the aperture to provide the required resolution, the sensitivity of the CCD sensor to record a high quality image from objects with a variety of brightness levels, the lifetime of the CCD arrays in the operating environment, the acquisition pointing and precision tracking necessary to provide high-resolution imagery at high angular rates, the spacecraft attitude, stabilization and control to permit the precision telescope pointing at high slew rates, and the on-board maneuver capacity for imaging slightly non-geosynchronous objects.



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