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Kyogamisaki, Japan

In a joint statement 04 October 2013, U.S. and Japanese diplomatic and military leaders agreed to revise the 1997 Guidelines for U.S.-Japan Defense Cooperation, increase security and defense collaboration in the Asia-Pacific region and beyond, and advance the realignment of American troops in Japan.

A second Army Navy Transportable Radar Surveillance system, or AN-TPY-2, will be placed at the Japanese Air Self-Defense Force base at Kyogamisaki, where it will augment one previously set up in Shariki on the northern part of Honshu Island. The new radar will "close the gaps," a U.S. official said, and will increase protection for the United States while defending Japan against possible North Korean missile strikes.

The "Tippy-Two," as it's commonly known, is an X-band, high-resolution, phased-array radar designed specifically for ballistic missile defense. It searches for and tracks inbound threats, and can be integrated with the Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense system and ground-based interceptors.

Unilateral deployment of anti-missile systems in some Asia-Pacific countries, especially in Japan, threatens peace and stability in the region, Chinese Foreign Ministry said 23 October 2014. "Some countries have pushed forward anti-missile system deployment in the Asia-Pacific region to seek unilateral security, which runs against regional stability and mutual trust as well as peace and stability in Northeast Asia," Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesperson Hua Chunying was quoted as saying by Xinhua news agency. "Relevant countries should not take (their own security concerns) as excuses for damaging others' security interests," the spokesperson added. Hua made the comments during a news briefing following media reports confirmed the US military delivered the X-band radar to the Kyogamisaki military base in Kyoto on 22 October 2014.




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