Homeland Security

03 November 2005

United States Joins International Crime Treaty

Ratification includes protocols on human trafficking, migrant smuggling

Department of State spokesman Sean McCormack announced November 3 that the United States is becoming a party to the Convention Against Transnational Organized Crime with the submission of its instrument of ratification at United Nations headquarters. 

“The United States and more than 120 countries actively participated in the negotiations, demonstrating the international community's resolve to combat transnational organized crime as a serious worldwide threat,” said McCormack. “Our ratification strengthens the United States' ongoing leadership role in these global efforts.”

The convention was negotiated in 1999-2000, and entered into force with the required number of ratifications in 2003. 

Additional information on the convention is available on the Web site of the U.N. Office on Drugs and Crime.

The text of McCormack’s statement follows.

(begin text)

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE
Office of the Spokesman
November 3, 2005

STATEMENT BY SEAN MCCORMACK, SPOKESMAN

United Nations Convention Against Transnational Organized Crime

Today, November 3, the United States will deposit its instrument of ratification for the UN Convention against Transnational Organized Crime and its supplementary protocols on trafficking in persons and migrant smuggling at United Nations headquarters.  The United States will become an official Party to the Convention and these two Protocols on December 3, 2005 - thirty days after its deposit.

The Convention represents the first legally binding multilateral instrument that specifically targets transnational organized crime. The United States and more than 120 countries actively participated in the negotiations, demonstrating the international community's resolve to combat transnational organized crime as a serious worldwide threat. Our ratification strengthens the United States' ongoing leadership role in these global efforts.

The United States is especially pleased to become party to the Protocol to Prevent, Suppress, and Punish Trafficking in Persons.  It demonstrates our strong commitment to end modern-day slavery.  We look forward to accelerating our partnership with other countries to prevent human trafficking, prosecute the perpetrators, and protect the victims of this terrible crime.

(end text)

(Distributed by the Bureau of International Information Programs, U.S. Department of State. Web site: http://usinfo.state.gov)



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