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Homeland Security

23 March 2005

North American Partnership Offers Agenda for Security

U.S., Mexico, Canada seek enhanced trade while fighting terrorism

President Bush, Mexican Prime Minister Vicente Fox, and Canadian Prime Minister Paul Martin, convening March 23 for a trilateral meeting in Waco, Texas, have reached broad agreement on a number of issues that their countries will jointly address in order to enhance the security agenda of North America.

According to a fact sheet issued March 23 by the White House, the three neighboring countries are committed to ensuring streamlined movement of legitimate travelers and cargo across shared national borders, securing North America from external threats, and preventing and responding to threats within North America.

Mexico, Canada and the United States will also work together to develop and implement a border-facilitation strategy that serves to further streamline the secure movement of low-risk traffic across their shared borders.

Following is the text of the White House fact sheet, with further details on the trilateral security agenda:

(begin fact sheet)

THE WHITE HOUSE
Office of the Press Secretary
(Crawford, Texas)

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 23, 2005

SECURITY AND PROSPERITY PARTNERSHIP OF NORTH AMERICA

SECURITY AGENDA

We are launching the next generation of our common security strategy to further secure North America and ensure the streamlined movement of legitimate travelers and cargo across our shared borders. To this end, Canada, the United States, and Mexico will work together to ensure the highest continent-wide security standards and streamlined risk-based border processes are achieved in the following priority areas:

1) Secure North America from external threats

-- Develop and implement a North American traveler security strategy, to include consistent outcomes with compatible processes, for screening prior to departure from a foreign port and at the first port of entry to North America.

-- Develop and implement a North American cargo security strategy to ensure compatible screening methods for goods and cargo prior to departure from a foreign port and at the first point of entry to North America.

-- Develop and implement a North American bio-protection strategy to assess, prevent, protect, detect, and respond to intentional, as well as applicable naturally occurring threats to public health and the food and agriculture system.

2) Prevent and respond to threats within North America

-- Develop and implement a strategy to enhance North American maritime transportation and port security.

-- Develop and implement a strategy to establish equivalent approaches to aviation security for North America.

-- Develop and implement a comprehensive North American strategy for combating transnational threats to the United States, Canada, and Mexico, including terrorism, organized crime, illegal drugs, migrant and contraband smuggling and trafficking.

-- Enhance partnerships on intelligence related to North American security.

-- Develop and implement a common approach to critical infrastructure protection, and response to cross-border terrorist incidents and, as applicable, natural disasters.

3) Further streamline the secure movement of low-risk traffic across our shared borders

-- Develop and implement a border-facilitation strategy to build capacity and improve the legitimate flow of people and cargo at ports of entry within North America.

-- Identify, develop, and deploy new technologies to advance our shared security goals and promote the legitimate flow of people and goods across our borders.

(end fact sheet)

(Distributed by the Bureau of International Information Programs, U.S. Department of State. Web site: http://usinfo.state.gov)



This page printed from: http://usinfo.state.gov/xarchives/display.html?p=washfile-english&y=2005&m=March&x=20050323153942GLnesnoM3.165835e-02&t=livefeeds/wf-latest.html



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