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AN/PSS-14 Handheld Standoff Mine Detection System (HSTAMIDS)

Handheld Standoff Mine Detection System (HSTAMIDS) is a handheld mine detector capable of detecting all metallic and non-metallic anti-tank (AT) and anti-personnel (AP) mines. It combines the maturing technology of ground penetrating radar (GPR) and improved metal-detection (MD) to provide a robust probability of detection (Pd) for both large and small metallic and non-metallic anti-tank and anti-personnel mines. HSTAMIDS will significantly improve detection of the smaller, low-metal AP mines by allowing the operator to "tune-out" metallic clutter associated with the current Army mine detector, the AN/PSS-12. The overall design weight of the HSTAMIDS will be comparable to that of the AN/PSS-12 for both the detector head weight and control equipment. Integral to the success of this program is an improved soldier-machine interface and a more robust training package to create better-trained and confident operators.

HSTAMIDS is employed in both predicable and unpredictable scenarios. It will be used to widen existing lanes through a minefield, create new ones or clear the entire mine obstacle. It will assist in reconnaissance missions on route, clearing bivouac sites or supporting contingency operations. HSTAMIDS will also provide an effective capability for mine detection to the commander or troops that find themselves in an unanticipated mine environment and need to extract themselves and their equipment.

The Handheld Standoff Mine Detection System (HSTAMIDS), developed for the U.S. Army Engineer School, MANSCEN, Fort Leonard Wood, MO, is a handheld device with sensors to detect all metallic and nonmetallic antitank and antipersonnel mines. If a mine is detected, an audio cue alerts the operator. Built-in warning and test equipment also alerts the operator of potential system malfunctions and assists unit maintenance personnel in locating the problem.

Current mine detectors detect only mines with metal content and generally have difficulty picking up mines with low metal content. They also have trouble distinguishing nails, shrapnel and other clutter that often leads to false alarms. Operating in magnetic soils can present problems as well. The HSTAMIDS is a vast improvement over today's metallic handheld mine detectors in that it employs an advanced state-of-the-art metallic detector in addition to ground penetrating radar (GPR). This is coupled with an advanced microprocessor array and software to provide a high probability of detection (in excess of 95 percent) for both large and small metallic and nonmetallic antitank and antipersonnel mines. The result is a greatly improved system that will protect the soldier and enhance his ability to detect landmines.

The updated HSTAMIDS Operational Requirements Document (ORD) was approved on 23 October 2000

Initially slated to begin production some time in fiscal year 2004, HSTAMIDS was about one-and-a-half years ahead of schedule by the end of 2002. The Army procured 210 Handheld Standoff Mine Detection Systems by the end of the December 2002 to support activities in Operation Enduring Freedom.

The AN/PSS-14 is the most improved and up-to-date version of the HSTAMIDS, a handheld device with sensors to detect all metallic and nonmetallic antitank and antipersonnel mines. If a mine is detected, an audio cue alerts the operator. Built-in warning and test equipment also alerts the operator of potential system malfunctions and assists unit maintenance personnel in fault identification. Current mine detectors detect only mines with metal content and generally have difficulty picking up mines with low metal content. They also have trouble distinguishing nails, shrapnel and other clutter that often leads to false alarms. Operating in ferrous soils can present problems as well. HSTAMIDS weighs approximately eight pounds, uses standard batteries and can be operated by a single soldier.

MS 0:
MS 1:
Gov Check Test
DT (soldier "excursion")
MS II
IOT&E
MS C (Type Classification)
Production Award Option

28 May 92
06 Nov 95
Jun, Sep, Jan 99
May 00
1 Qtr FY01
1 Qtr FY03
2 Qtr FY03
3 Qtr FY03





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