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CHAPTER 4

ADVANCED GROUND-FIGHTING TECHNIQUES

After achieving an understanding of the basics of ground fighting, other elements of fighting on the ground are added. These techniques, however, are dependent on a thorough grasp of the basics. Being systematic is important in building competent fighters. Staying with the program will not only produce competent fighters quickly, but will produce the most competent fighters over time as well.

Section I. ADVANCED ATTACKS

Concentrating on offensive techniques is preferable when developing a training plan. The best defense is simply knowing that the technique exists. If defenses are to be taught, there should be ample time between teaching the offense and teaching the defense to allow time for the students to master the offensive skills first. Training the defense prematurely will hinder development.

4-1. ADVANCED BODY POSITIONS

a. North-South Position (Figure 4-1). This position allows many possible attacks and is very difficult for the enemy to escape from. You should attempt to control the enemy's arms by placing your elbows on the ground in his arm pits. You will also need to shift your weight in order to prevent him from rolling you over.

Figure 4-1. North-south position.

Figure 4-1. North-south position.

b. Knee in the Stomach (Figure 4-2). Another very important dominant body position is the knee mount. When in the knee mount, the knee should be in the middle of the enemy's chest. The foot should be hooked around his hip. The opposite knee should be off of the ground and back away from the enemy's head, and the hips should be set forward to maintain balance.

Figure 4-2. Knee in the stomach.

Figure 4-2. Knee in the stomach.

4-2. PASS THE GUARD

When you are inside of the enemy's guard, he has many options to attack you or reverse the positions. Therefore, you will need several possible techniques to pass.

a. Closed Guard. In the closed guard, the enemy has his legs locked together behind your back.

(1) Knee in the Tailbone.

(a) Step 1 (Figure 4-3). Moving one hand at a time, grasp the enemy at the belt with both hands. Keep pressure on him to prevent him from sitting up.

Figure 4-3. Knee in the tailbone, step 1.

Figure 4-3. Knee in the tailbone, step 1.

(b) Step 2 (Figure 4-4). Place one of your knees in the enemy's tailbone. You will need to lean toward the other side to prevent him from compromising your balance.

Figure 4-4. Knee in the tailbone, step 2.

Figure 4-4. Knee in the tailbone, step 2.

(c) Step 3 (Figure 4-5). Push with both hands, and move your other knee back away from him. This should create a 90 degree angle from the knee in the tailbone. This action will also create more distance between the knee in the tailbone and your hip, forcing him to loosen the grip with his legs.

Figure 4-5. Knee in the tailbone, step 3.

Figure 4-5. Knee in the tailbone, step 3.

(d) Step 4 (Figure 4-6). Release your grip with the hand on the side you are facing and move it under the enemy's leg on the same side. You will then lift his leg, pulling it to you to gain control, and pass normally.

Figure 4-6. Knee in the tailbone, step 4.

Figure 4-6. Knee in the tailbone, step 4.

 

Figure 4-6. Knee in the tailbone, step 4 (continued).

Figure 4-6. Knee in the tailbone, step 4 (continued).

e. Step 5 (Figure 4-7). Pull your remaining hand out from between his legs at the earliest possible time to avoid the arm bar, and secure a grip at his waist.

Figure 4-7. Knee in the tailbone, step 5.

Figure 4-7. Knee in the tailbone, step 5.

(2) Stand Up With One Sleeve.

(a) Step 1 (Figure 4-8). Gain control of one of the enemy's sleeves near the wrist, and with the other hand grasp his jacket in the center to keep him from sitting up.

Figure 4-8. Stand up with one sleeve, step 1.

(b) Step 2 (Figure 4-9). Stand up with the leg closest to the arm you are controlling first and arch your back slightly, pulling on the sleeve that you control.

Figure 4-9. Stand up with one sleeve, step 2.

Figure 4-9. Stand up with one sleeve, step 2.

 

Figure 4-9. Stand up with one sleeve, step 2 (continued).

Figure 4-9. Stand up with one sleeve, step 2 (continued).

(c) Step 3 (Figure 4-10). Switch control of his sleeve to your other hand and use the original hand to push downward on his legs to break his grip. It is helpful to step slightly back with the leg on the side you are attempting to open.

Figure 4-10. Stand up with one sleeve, step 3.

Figure 4-10. Stand up with one sleeve, step 3.

(d) Step 4 (Figure 4-11). When his grip breaks, reach under the leg and pull it to you, tightening up to gain control and pass like before. It is important to control the leg below his knee so that he cannot bend it to escape and regain the guard.

Figure 4-11. Stand up with one sleeve, step 3.

Figure 4-11. Stand up with one sleeve, step 3.

(3) Hands in the Arm Pits.

(a) Step 1 (Figure 4-12). Pin the enemy's shoulders to the ground by either placing the fingers of your hands in both of his armpits, or placing both hands around his neck.

Figure 4-12. Hands in the arm pits, step 1.

Figure 4-12. Hands in the arm pits, step 1.

 

Figure 4-12. Hands in the arm pits, step 1 (continued).

Figure 4-12. Hands in the arm pits, step 1 (continued).

(b) Step 2 (Figure 4-13). Stand up one leg at a time, placing one of your knees in his tailbone and stepping back with the other. The heal of your foot must be planted on the ground.

Figure 4-13. Hands in the arm pits, step 2.

Figure 4-13. Hands in the arm pits, step 2.

(c) Step 3 (Figure 4-14). Sit down so that your knee is driven upward between the enemy's legs. This will break the grip of his legs behind your back.

Figure 4-14. Hands in the arm pits, step 3.

Figure 4-14. Hands in the arm pits, step 3.

(d) Step 4 (Figure 4-15). Drive your knee over his leg on the opposite side. This will immobilize the leg so that you can bring both legs over into side control.

Figure 4-15. Hands in the arm pits, step 4.

Figure 4-15. Hands in the arm pits, step 4.

 

Figure 4-15. Hands in the arm pits, step 4 (continued).

Figure 4-15. Hands in the arm pits, step 4 (continued).

b. Open Guard. Once you have opened the enemy's guard, he may block your passing by controlling you with his legs. You must gain control of his legs before you can pass.

(1) Throw the Legs.

(a) Step 1 (Figure 4-16). Grasp the enemy's pant legs near the ankles with a firm grasp and stand up, pulling him slightly toward you.

Figure 4-16. Throw the legs, step 1.

Figure 4-16. Throw the legs, step 1.

(b) Step 2 (Figure 4-17). Swing both legs from side to side and then throw them forcefully to one side.

Figure 4-17. Throw the legs, step 2.

Figure 4-17. Throw the legs, step 2.

(c) Step 3 (Figure 4-18). Close the distance and gain control in either the side control or knee mount position.

Figure 4-18. Throw the legs, step 3.

Figure 4-18. Throw the legs, step 3.

(2) Push the Knees.

(a) Step 1 (Figure 4-19). Gain control of the enemy's pant legs on top of each knee.

Figure 4-19. Push the knees, step 1.

Figure 4-19. Push the knees, step 1.

(b) Step 2 (Figure 4-20). Step back and drive both knees downward.

Figure 4-20. Push the knees, step 2.

Figure 4-20. Push the knees, step 2.

(c) Step 3 (Figure 4-21). While still holding the enemy's knees down, jump forward with both legs into the mounted position.

Figure 4-21. Push the knees, step 3.

Figure 4-21. Push the knees, step 3.

4-3. ATTACKS FROM THE MOUNT

After the mount has been achieved, there are many options on how to attack. The first is to throw punches into the enemy's face and force him to turn over, giving up his back. If he does not turn over he will most likely give an opening, making the following attacks easier.

a. Chokes. The most efficient way to incapacitate an enemy is to choke him into unconsciousness. An advantage of prioritizing chokes in training is that they can be applied in training exactly as applied in combat.

(1) Paper Cutter Choke.

(a) Step 1 (Figure 4-22). Start by opening the collar with the weak hand, as in the cross collar choke. With the strong hand grasp deep into the collar, inserting the thumb on the inside.

Figure 4-22. Paper cutter choke, step 1.

Figure 4-22. Paper cutter choke, step 1.

(b) Step 2 (Figure 4-23). Release the grip of the first hand and grasp the opposite side of the enemy's jacket, pulling it tight against the back of his neck.

Figure 4-23. Paper cutter choke, step 2.

Figure 4-23. Paper cutter choke, step 2.

(c) Step 3 (Figure 4-24). Drive the elbow of the other hand across the enemy's neck to complete the choke.

Figure 4-24. Paper cutter choke, step 3.

Figure 4-24. Paper cutter choke, step 3.

(2) Leaning Choke.

(a) Step 1 (Figure 4-25). Grasp both sides of the collar. The knuckles should be pointed inward and there should be three or four inches of slack.

Figure 4-25. Leaning choke, step 1.

Figure 4-25. Leaning choke, step 1.

(b) Step 2 (Figure 4-26). Pull one side of the collar across the enemy's neck so the pinky knuckle is just past the Adam's apple where the blood vessels are located. Pull the other hand tight as you drive this hand into the enemy's neck.

Figure 4-26. Leaning choke, step 2.

Figure 4-26. Leaning choke, step 2.

(3) Nutcracker Choke.

(a) Step 1 (Figure 4-27). Grasp the collar with both hands at the sides of the enemy's neck. Knuckles should be pointed in against the neck.

Figure 4-27. Nutcracker choke, step 1.

Figure 4-27. Nutcracker choke, step 1.

(b) Step 2 (Figure 4-28). Pull the collar tight against the back of the enemy's neck with both hands and, with the pinkies acting as the base, drive the pointer finger knuckles of both hands into the enemy's neck on either side of the Adam's apple.

Figure 4-28. Nutcracker choke, step 2.

Figure 4-28. Nutcracker choke, step 2.

(4) Sleeve Choke.

(a) Step 1 (Figure 4-29). Place the fingers of one hand inside the sleeve cuff of the other with a firm grip.

Figure 4-29. Sleeve choke, step 1.

Figure 4-29. Sleeve choke, step 1.

(b) Step 2 (Figure 4-30). Drive the other hand behind the enemy's head so the forearm of the first hand goes across the neck.

Figure 4-30. Sleeve choke, step 2.

Figure 4-30. Sleeve choke, step 2.

(c) Step 3 (Figure 4-31). Drive the elbow across the enemy's neck toward the back while pulling with the other hand.

Figure 4-31. Sleeve choke, step 3.

Figure 4-31. Sleeve choke, step 3.

b. Triple Attack. When the enemy tries to escape the mount using the trap and roll technique, he can be moved into the position shown by sliding the trapped foot forward and lifting on the enemy's opposite shoulder. This position presents several attack opportunities.

(1) Lapel Choke.

(a) Step 1 (Figure 4-32). With the hand that corresponds to the side the enemy is facing, place the fingers inside of the enemy's collar and pull it open.

Figure 4-32. Lapel choke, step 1.

Figure 4-32. Lapel choke, step 1.

(b) Step 2 (Figure 4-33). Reach under his head with the other hand and insert the thumb as deep as possible into the collar.

Figure 4-33. Lapel choke, step 2.

Figure 4-33. Lapel choke, step 2.

(c) Step 3 (Figure 4-34). Change the grip of the first hand to the opposite side of his lapel to tighten the collar against the back of his neck.

Figure 4-34. Lapel choke, step 3.

Figure 4-34. Lapel choke, step 3.

(d) Step 4 (Figure 4-35). Tighten by extending both arms.

Figure 4-35. Lapel choke, step 4.

Figure 4-35. Lapel choke, step 4.

(2) Straight Arm Bar. The enemy may attempt to block the choke with his hands.

(a) Step 1 (Figure 4-36). Ensuring that your arm is under the enemy's arm, push his elbow forward and hold it in place by grasping your own collar.

Figure 4-36. Straight arm bar, step 1.

Figure 4-36. Straight arm bar, step 1.

(b) Step 2 (Figure 4-37). Place your other hand on the enemy's head.

Figure 4-37. Straight arm bar, step 2.

Figure 4-37. Straight arm bar, step 2.

(c) Step 3 (Figure 4-38). Rest all of your weight on the enemy's head, and point your toe straight back.

Figure 4-38. Straight arm bar, step 3.

Figure 4-38. Straight arm bar, step 3.

(d) Step 4 (Figure 4-39). Swing your leg around on top of his head and sit back into the straight arm bar.

Figure 4-39. Straight arm bar, step 4.

Figure 4-39. Straight arm bar, step 4.

(3) Gain the Back Mount. If the enemy defends both the choke and the arm bar, you still have another option.

(a) Step 1 (Figure 4-40). Push the enemy toward his stomach with chest pressure, and at the same time bring your foot close to the enemy's back.

Figure 4-40. Gain the back mount, step 1.

Figure 4-40. Gain the back mount, step 1.

(b) Step 2 (Figure 4-41). Sit back, pulling the enemy on top of you, ensuring you give yourself room to swing your foot around to sink in your hook. You will finish in the back mount.

Figure 4-41. Gain the back mount, step 2.

Figure 4-41. Gain the back mount, step 2.

4-4. ATTACKS FROM THE BACK MOUNT

Once the back mount has been achieved, keeping it is the most important goal. The position learned earlier of one hand in the armpit and the other over the opposite shoulder allows the most possible attacks.

a. Collar Choke.

(1) Step 1 (Figure 4-42). Grasp the collar with the hand in the armpit, pulling it open to insert the thumb of the other hand deep into the collar. Secure a firm grip.

Figure 4-42. Collar choke, step 1.

Figure 4-42. Collar choke, step 1.

(2) Step 2 (Figure 4-43). Change the grip of the hand under the armpit to grasp the opposite lapel, pulling down to tighten the collar against the back of the enemy's neck.

Figure 4-43. Collar choke, step 2.

Figure 4-43. Collar choke, step 2.

(3) Step 3 (Figure 4-44). Set the choke by pushing outward with both hands.

Figure 4-44. Collar choke, step 3.

Figure 4-44. Collar choke, step 3.

b. Single Wing Choke.

(1) Step 1 (Figure 4-45). Open the collar and secure a grip the same as in the collar choke.

Figure 4-45. Single wing choke, step 1.

Figure 4-45. Single wing choke, step 1.

(2) Step 2 (Figure 4-46). With the hand that is under the enemy's armpit, pull his arm out at the elbow.

Figure 4-46. Single wing choke, step 2.

Figure 4-46. Single wing choke, step 2.

(3) Step 3 (Figure 4-47). Bring your hand around behind his head and finish the choke by pushing out with both hands.

Figure 4-47. Single wing choke, step 3.

Figure 4-47. Single wing choke, step 3.

c. Straight Arm Bar.

(1) Step 1 (Figure 4-48). If the enemy is protecting his collar effectively, push your arm further through his armpit, pulling your own collar open with the other hand. Grasp your collar with the hand that is through his armpit.

Figure 4-48. Straight arm bar, step 1.

Figure 4-48. Straight arm bar, step 1.

(2) Step 2 (Figure 4-49). With the palm of your other hand, push his head away and step your leg over it. Break his grip by pushing with your legs and extending your body.

Figure 4-49. Straight arm bar, step 2.

Figure 4-49. Straight arm bar, step 2.

(3) Step 3 (Figure 4-50). Finish with hip pressure against his elbow as in the basic straight arm bar.

Figure 4-50. Straight arm bar, step 3.

Figure 4-50. Straight arm bar, step 3.

4-5. ATTACKS FROM THE GUARD

a. Arm Lock.

(1) Step 1 (Figure 4-51). If the enemy places his hand on the ground, grasp it around the wrist.

Figure 4-51. Arm lock, step 1.

Figure 4-51. Arm lock, step 1.

(2) Step 2 (Figure 4-52). Release your legs and sit up. Reach over and around his arm grasping your own wrist.

Figure 4-52. Arm lock, step 2.

Figure 4-52. Arm lock, step 2.

(3) Step 3 (Figure 4-53). Keep your legs tight against his sides to prevent him stepping over them, and sit back.

Figure 4-53. Arm lock, step 3.

Figure 4-53. Arm lock, step 3.

(4) Step 4 (Figure 4-54). Move your hips out from under him and finish by rotating your torso to attack his shoulder joint. Ensure that his arm is held at 90 degrees and not up behind his back.

Figure 4-54. Arm lock, step 4.

Figure 4-54. Arm lock, step 4.

b. Guillotine Choke. When you are attempting the arm bar, the enemy may try to counter by grasping you around the waist.

(1) Step 1 (Figure 4-55). Release your grasp of his wrist and place your hand on the ground behind you. This allows you to move your hips back until you are sitting straight up.

Figure 4-55. Guillotine choke, step 1.

Figure 4-55. Guillotine choke, step 1.

(2) Step 2 (Figure 4-56). Wrap your other hand around the enemy's neck and under his chin. Grasp his chin with the hand that was on the ground. Both palms should be facing your body.

Figure 4-56. Guillotine choke, step 2.

Figure 4-56. Guillotine choke, step 2.

 

Figure 4-56. Guillotine choke, step 2 (continued).

Figure 4-56. Guillotine choke, step 2 (continued).

(3) Step 3 (Figure 4-57). Pull upward with both hands and finish the choke by leaning backwards and wrapping your legs around him, pull with your arms and push with your legs.

Figure 4-57. Guillotine choke, step 3.

Figure 4-57. Guillotine choke, step 3.

c. Sweeps. When you have the enemy within your guard, he may provide the chance to reverse the positions.

(1) Scissors Sweep.

(a) Step 1 (Figure 4-58). When the enemy raises one leg while attempting to pass the guard, you should place your weight on the calf on that side and swing your hips out from underneath him. Your leg should go along his belt line with your foot hooked around his waist.

Figure 4-58. Scissors sweep, step 1.

Figure 4-58. Scissors sweep, step 1.

 

Figure 4-58. Scissors sweep, step 1 (continued).

Figure 4-58. Scissors sweep, step 1 (continued).

(b) Step 2 (Figure 4-59). Move your chest away and kick him over with a scissors action from your legs, ending up mounted.

Figure 4-59. Scissors sweep, step 2.

Figure 4-59. Scissors sweep, step 2.

 

Figure 4-59. Scissors sweep, step 2 (continued).

Figure 4-59. Scissors sweep, step 2 (continued).

(2) Captain Kirk. The enemy may attempt to pass by standing up. When he does he is very susceptible to being swept.

(a) Step 1 (Figure 4-60). When the enemy stands up, maintain control with your arms and let your feet slide naturally down until they are on his hips.

Figure 4-60. Captain Kirk, step 1.

Figure 4-60. Captain Kirk, step 1.

(b) Step 2 (Figure 4-61). If his weight gets too far forward, pick him up with your legs and throw him over one of your shoulders. Ensure that you move your head to the opposite side to prevent him landing on you. Finish mounted.

Figure 4-61. Captain Kirk, step 2.

Figure 4-61. Captain Kirk, step 2.

(3) Ankle Grab/Knee Push.

(a) Step 1 (Figure 4-62). When the enemy stands up, maintain control with your arms and let your feet slide to his hips as in the previous move.

Figure 4-62. Ankle grab/knee push, step 1.

Figure 4-62. Ankle grab/knee push, step 1.

(b) Step 2 (Figure 4-63). If his weight gets too far back, let go with your arms and grasp both of his ankles. Push your knees upward causing him to fall backwards.

Figure 4-63. Ankle grab/knee push, step 2.

Figure 4-63. Ankle grab/knee push, step 2.

 

Figure 4-63. Ankle grab/knee push, step 2 (continued).

Figure 4-63. Ankle grab/knee push, step 2 (continued).

(c) Step 3 (Figure 4-64). Drive one of your knees to the ground and grasp the back of his neck with the other hand to pull yourself to the mount.

Figure 4-64. Ankle grab/knee push, step 3.

Figure 4-64. Ankle grab/knee push, step 3.

d. Triangle Choke. If the enemy gets his hand through and begins to pass your guard, you still have a chance to apply a choke.

(1) Step 1 (Figure 4-65). Post your leg on the ground and turn your body perpendicular to the enemy's. Your leg should be around the back of his neck.

Figure 4-65. Triangle choke, step 1.

Figure 4-65. Triangle choke, step 1.

(2) Step 2 (Figure 4-66). Place the inside of your knee over your own foot. You may assist yourself by grasping your foot with your hand.

Figure 4-66. Triangle choke, step 2.

Figure 4-66. Triangle choke, step 2.

(3) Step 3 (Figure 4-67). Place both of your hands on the back of the enemy's head and push upward with your hips.

Figure 4-67. Triangle choke, step 3.

Figure 4-67. Triangle choke, step 3.

4-6. KNEE MOUNT

When the enemy is defending well from side control, a good option is to go to the knee mount.

a. Achieve the knee mount from standard side control.

(1) Step 1 (Figure 4-68). With the hand closest to the enemy's head, grasp the collar on either side of his head.

Figure 4-68. Knee mount from standard side control, step 1.

Figure 4-68. Knee mount from standard side control, step 1.

(2) Step 2 (Figure 4-69). With the other hand, grasp his belt or his uniform over his hip.

Figure 4-69. Knee mount from standard side control, step 2.

Figure 4-69. Knee mount from standard side control, step 2.

(3) Step 3 (Figure 4-70). Pushing up with both hands, pop up into the knee mount with one swift movement.

Figure 4-70. Knee mount from standard side control, step 3.

Figure 4-70. Knee mount from standard side control, step 3.

b. Achieve the knee mount with control of the far side arm.

(1) Step 1 (Figure 4-71). From side control, move your arm through the enemy's armpit.

Figure 4-71. Achieve knee mount with control of far side arm, step 1.

Figure 4-71. Achieve knee mount with control of far side arm, step 1.

(2) Step 2 (Figure 4-72). With the other arm, reach back and gain control of his elbow. Pulling the arm upwards as you change your hips, sit through to the position shown.

Figure 4-72. Achieve knee mount with control of far side arm, step 2.

Figure 4-72. Achieve knee mount with control of far side arm, step 2.

 

Figure 4-72. Achieve knee mount with control of far side arm, step 2 (continued).

Figure 4-72. Achieve knee mount with control of far side arm, step 2 (continued).

(3) Step 3 (Figure 4-73). Place the foot of the leg closest to the enemy underneath the other leg. With your weight on the hand in the enemy's armpit and your outside leg, swing your inside leg up into the knee mount. Ensure that you maintain control of the enemy's near side arm.

Figure 4-73. Achieve knee mount with control of far side arm, step 3.

Figure 4-73. Achieve knee mount with control of far side arm, step 3.

 

Figure 4-73. Achieve knee mount with control of far side arm, step 3 (continued).

Figure 4-73. Achieve knee mount with control of far side arm, step 3 (continued).

c. Attacks from the Knee Mount.

(1) Chokes with Hand on the Far Side of the Enemy's Neck.

(a) Step 1 (Figure 4-74). If the enemy does not defend against chokes, reach under the first arm and grasp well down into the collar with your fingers inside the collar.

Figure 4-74. Choke from the knee mount with hand on far side of enemy's neck, step 1.

Figure 4-74. Choke from the knee mount with hand on far side of enemy's neck, step 1.

(b) Step 2 (Figure 4-75). Bring your knee back off of the enemy's chest, placing it to control his hip, and finish as in the paper cutter choke.

Figure 4-75. Choke from the knee mount with hand on far side of enemy's neck, step 2.

Figure 4-75. Choke from the knee mount with hand on far side of enemy's neck, step 2.

(2) Chokes with Hand on the Near Side of the Enemy's Neck.

(a) Step 1 (Figure 4-76). Reach into the far side of the enemy's collar with your fingers on the inside of the collar.

Figure 4-76. Choke from the knee mount with hand on near side of enemy's neck, step 1.

Figure 4-76. Choke from the knee mount with hand on near side of enemy's neck, step 1.

(b) Step 2 (Figure 4-77). With your weight on the leg closest to his head, sit through and drive your elbow across his neck.

Figure 4-77. Choke from the knee mount with hand on near side of enemy's neck, step 2.

Figure 4-77. Choke from the knee mount with hand on near side of enemy's neck, step 2.

(3) Straight Arm Bar from the Knee Mount.

(a) Step 1 (Figure 4-78). If the enemy pushes up with his near side arm, grasp it at the elbow with your arm closest to the enemy's head. Step over his head with the same side leg.

Figure 4-78. Straight arm bar from the knee mount, step 1.

Figure 4-78. Straight arm bar from the knee mount, step 1.

 

Figure 4-78. Straight arm bar from the knee mount, step 1 (continued).

Figure 4-78. Straight arm bar from the knee mount, step 1 (continued).

(b) Step 2 (Figure 4-79). Sit down as close to his shoulder as possible and lay back into the straight arm bar. You may need to twist slightly toward his legs because the change in your leg position allows him an opportunity to roll out of the technique. You do not need to bring your other leg across his body.

Figure 4-79. Straight arm bar from the knee mount, step 2.

Figure 4-79. Straight arm bar from the knee mount, step 2.

(4) Bent Arm Bar from the Knee Mount.

(a) Step 1 (Figure 4-80). If the enemy tries to push your knee off, grasp his wrist with the hand closest to his legs.

Figure 4-80. Bent arm bar from the knee mount, step 1.

Figure 4-80. Bent arm bar from the knee mount, step 1.

(b) Step 2 (Figure 4-81). Back your knee off of his chest and reach over his arm with the other hand, grasping your own wrist. Your second hand should be wrapped completely around his arm at this time.

Figure 4-81. Bent arm bar from the knee mount, step 2.

Figure 4-81. Bent arm bar from the knee mount, step 2.

(c) Step 3 (Figure 4-82). Move around until his head is between your knees, and pull him up onto his side.

Figure 4-82. Bent arm bar from the knee mount, step 3.

Figure 4-82. Bent arm bar from the knee mount, step 3.

(d) Step 4 (Figure 4-83). Break his grip by pulling his arm quickly toward his head.

Figure 4-83. Bent arm bar from the knee mount, step 4.

Figure 4-83. Bent arm bar from the knee mount, step 4.

(e) Step 5 (Figure 4-84). Step your foot into the small of his back, and break his shoulder by rotating your torso towards his back.

Figure 4-84. Bent arm bar from the knee mount, step 5.

Figure 4-84. Bent arm bar from the knee mount, step 5.

Note:

It is important to keep the enemy's elbow tight to your chest to keep him from escaping.

(5) Variation of Straight Arm Bar from the Knee Mount.

(a) Step 1 (Figure 4-85). If the enemy has a firm grip and you cannot get the bent arm bar, push your arm farther through and grasp your own lapel.

Figure 4-85. Variation of the straight arm bar from the knee mount, step 1.

Figure 4-85. Variation of the straight arm bar from the knee mount, step 1.

(b) Step 2 (Figure 4-86). Stand up and place your foot over his head and in front of his chin.

Figure 4-86. Variation of the straight arm bar from the knee mount, step 2.

Figure 4-86. Variation of the straight arm bar from the knee mount, step 2.

4-7. LEG ATTACKS

Leg attacks, although very effective, have the drawback of giving up dominant body position. Therefore, they are not the preferred method of attack. Soldiers must be familiar with them or they will fall easy prey to them. As in all attacks, knowing the technique exists is the primary defense.

a. Straight Ankle Lock.

(1) Step 1 (Figure 4-87). When you are trying to pass the enemy's open guard, you may catch his foot in your armpit. Wrap your arm around his leg and squat down, ensuring that your opposite side knee comes up between his legs.

Figure 4-87. Straight ankle lock, step 1.

Figure 4-87. Straight ankle lock, step 1.

(2) Step 2 (Figure 4-88). Push away from the enemy, ensuring that you allow his leg to slide through your grip until you are holding around his ankle.

Figure 4-88. Straight ankle lock, step 2.

Figure 4-88. Straight ankle lock, step 2.

(3) Step 3 (Figure 4-89). Bring your outside foot up to push the enemy's torso back, preventing him from sitting up to counter the lock. Form a figure four on his ankle and finish the break by arching your back.

Figure 4-89. Straight ankle lock, step 3.

Figure 4-89. Straight ankle lock, step 3.

b. Figure-Four Ankle Lock (Figure 4-90). You are on top of the enemy in the north-south position. The enemy may bring his knee up in order to defend against your attacks or attempt to strike you. When he does, reach under his leg from the outside, near the ankle. With the other hand, grasp his foot and form the figure four as shown with the first hand. Apply pressure to break the enemy's foot.

Figure 4-90. Figure-four ankle lock.

Figure 4-90. Figure-four ankle lock.

c. Straight Knee Bar.

(1) Step 1 (Figure 4-91). The enemy is beneath you and has one of your legs between his. Reach your arm under his far side leg, stand up, and step over his body with your other leg.

Figure 4-91. Straight knee bar, step 1.

Figure 4-91. Straight knee bar, step 1.

 

Figure 4-91. Straight knee bar, step 1 (continued).

Figure 4-91. Straight knee bar, step 1 (continued).

(2) Step 2 (Figure 4-92). Keep your hips as close to the enemy's as possible and lock your legs behind his buttocks. Break the knee with hip pressure just as in a straight arm bar. You may also place his leg into your armpit to increase the pressure, or switch to the figure-four ankle lock at any time.

Figure 4-92. Straight knee bar, step 2.

Figure 4-92. Straight knee bar, step 2.

 

Figure 4-92. Straight knee bar, step 2 (continued).

Figure 4-92. Straight knee bar, step 2 (continued).

Section II. STRIKES

Striking is an integral part of all actual fighting. Practicing ground-fighting techniques exclusively without strikes is a common mistake.

4-8. PASS THE GUARD WITH STRIKES

a. Step 1 (Figure 4-93). Keeping your head close to the enemy's chest, drive both hands up the center of his body and then out to control his arms at the biceps.

Figure 4-93. Pass the guard with strikes, step 1.

Figure 4-93. Pass the guard with strikes, step 1.

b. Step 2 (Figure 4-94). Give the enemy a couple of head butts.

Figure 4-94. Pass the guard with strikes, step 2.

Figure 4-94. Pass the guard with strikes, step 2.

Note:

Ensure that head butts are not given with the center of the forehead, which could result in injuring your own nose.

c. Step 3 (Figure 4-95). Stand up one leg at a time, and change your grip to one hand on the jacket. Your hips should be pushed slightly forward.

Figure 4-95. Pass the guard with strikes, step 3.

Figure 4-95. Pass the guard with strikes, step 3.

 

Figure 4-95. Pass the guard with strikes, step 3 (continued).

Figure 4-95. Pass the guard with strikes, step 3 (continued).

d. Step 4 (Figure 4-96). With your free hand, strike the enemy a couple of times in the head.

Figure 4-96. Pass the guard with strikes, step 4.

Figure 4-96. Pass the guard with strikes, step 4.

(At this point the enemy may release the grip with his legs. If he does, step 5 is as follows.)

e. Step 5 (Figure 4-97). Press inward with your knees. This will cause his legs to stick out so that you can reach behind one of them. Gain control of the leg and pass normally.

Figure 4-97. Pass the guard with strikes, step 5.

Figure 4-97. Pass the guard with strikes, step 5.

 

Figure 4-97. Pass the guard with strikes, step 5 (continued).

Figure 4-97. Pass the guard with strikes, step 5 (continued).

(If he does not release his legs, step 5 is as follows.)

f. Step 5 (Alternate) (Figure 4-98). While he is distracted by your strikes, step back with one leg and push your hand through the opening. Place your hand on your own knee and squat down to break the grip of his legs. Gain control of his leg and pass normally.

Figure 4-98. Pass the guard with strikes, step 5 (alternate).

Figure 4-98. Pass the guard with strikes, step 5 (alternate).

 

Figure 4-98. Pass the guard with strikes, step 5 (alternate) (continued).

Figure 4-98. Pass the guard with strikes, step 5 (alternate) (continued).

4-9. STRIKING FROM SIDE CONTROL

The goal of striking while ground fighting is to improve your position or create an opening for a better attack. In this case you would most likely be trying to mount.

a. Step 1 (Figure 4-99). Keeping your head low so that the enemy will not be able to knee you in the head, move your hand that is closest to the enemy's legs into his armpit.

Figure 4-99. Striking from side control, step 1.

Figure 4-99. Striking from side control, step 1.

b. Step 2 (Figure 4-100). Move your other arm around his head and clasp your hands together. Lean your shoulder onto his head to keep his chin pointed away from you. This will make it more difficult for him to turn his body toward you to regain the guard.

Figure 4-100. Striking from side control, step 2.

Figure 4-100. Striking from side control, step 2.

c. Step 3 (Figure 4-101). Move your leg that is closer to his head into his armpit, driving his arm upwards until it is pinched against his head between your arm and leg.

Figure 4-101. Striking from side control, step 3.

Figure 4-101. Striking from side control, step 3.

d. Step 4 (Figure 4-102). Point the toes of your other foot toward the sky and drive your knee into his ribs.

Figure 4-102 Striking from side control, step 4.

Figure 4-102 Striking from side control, step 4.

e. Step 5 (Figure 4-103). When he changes his position to defend against your strikes, step over and gain the mounted position.

Figure 4-103. Striking from side control, step 5.

Figure 4-103. Striking from side control, step 5.

4-10. DEFENDING AGAINST STRIKES IN THE GUARD

As with standup fighting, the best method to avoid punches is to stay very close to the enemy. Controlling the range is the key.

a. Step 1 (Figure 4-104). Pull the enemy into your closed guard and grasp him around the neck. One hand should be pushing his head and the other should be pulling it to defend against head butts and punches. Tuck your head in and control his punches with your elbows.

Figure 4-104. Defending against strikes in the guard, step 1.

Figure 4-104. Defending against strikes in the guard, step 1.

b. Step 2 (Figure 4-105). The enemy will eventually become frustrated by his inability to land solid blows and will attempt to pull away. When he does so, slide your arms over his triceps and your feet to his hips. Control his punches with your knees. As he struggles to gain a position to strike from, you will have to continuously regain this position.

Figure 4-105. Defending against strikes in the guard, step 2.

Figure 4-105. Defending against strikes in the guard, step 2.

c. Step 3 (Figure 4-106). Your hands are placed over the enemy's triceps to keep him from getting his arms loose for big punches. He may however be able to free one of his arms. If he does so and attempts to land a big punch, push your knee toward the loose arm to extend the distance and reach to the inside of his punching arm. This will avoid the strike and allow you to regain control of his arm.

Figure 4-106. Defending against strikes in the guard, step 3.

Figure 4-106. Defending against strikes in the guard, step 3.

d. Step 4 (Figure 4-107). The enemy may attempt to stand up. When he does you should sit up toward him, and when you have enough space to do so safely, stand up in base. You may need to use a kick with your bottom leg to create enough space.

Figure 4-107. Defending against strikes in the guard, step 4.

Figure 4-107. Defending against strikes in the guard, step 4.



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